Amazing Award-Winning Photos Of The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2017 Contest

11-14 years old category. Stuck In by Ashleigh Scully, USA.

Deep snow had blanketed the Lamar valley in Yellowstone national park, Wyoming, and the day was cold and overcast. This female American red fox was hunting beside the road, stepping quietly across the crusty surface of the snow. The image, says Ashleigh, “illustrates the harsh reality of winter life in Yellowstone”. (Photo by Ashleigh Scully/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner 2017 (Also Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Story category). Memorial to a Species by Brent Stirton, South Africa.

The killers were probably from a local community. Entering the Hluhluwe Imfolozi game reserve at night, they shot the black rhino bull using a silencer. Working fast, they hacked off the two horns and escaped. The horns would have been sold to a middleman and smuggled out of South Africa to China or Vietnam. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (Also winner 15-17 years old category). The Good Life by Daniel Nelson, The Netherlands.

Daniel met Caco in Odzala national park in the Republic of Congo. Here, Caco is feasting on a fleshy breadfruit. He is about nine years old and preparing to leave his family. Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered, threatened by illegal hunting for bushmeat, disease (notably the Ebola virus), habitat loss and the impact of climate change. (Photo by Daniel Nelson/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Invertebrates category. Crab Surprise by Justin Gilligan, Australia.

Out of the blue, an aggregation of giant spider crabs the size of a football field wandered past. Justin was documenting a University of Tasmania kelp transplant experiment and was taken by surprise. A Maori octopus seemed equally delighted with the unexpected bounty. It was having trouble choosing and catching a crab. Luckily for Justin, the stage was set with clear water and sunlight reflecting off the sand. (Photo by Justin Gilligan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

10 years and under category. The Grip of the Gulls by Ekaterina Bee, Italy.

Like all her family, five-and-a-half-year-old Ekaterina is fascinated by nature. On a boat trip off the coast of central Norway, her focus was on the cloud of herring gulls. They were after food, and as soon as Ekaterina threw them bread, they surrounded her. She liked the expression of the bird furthest away: “It looked very curious, as if it was trying to understand what was happening on the boat”. (Photo by Ekaterina Bee/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animal Portraits category. Contemplation by Peter Delaney, Ireland/South Africa.

Peter had spent a long, difficult morning tracking chimpanzees – part of a troop of some 250 – through Uganda’s Kibale national park. Totti was busy with vigorous courtship, pacing and gesticulating for a female in the canopy. It was only when he finally flopped down, worn out with unrequited love, that Peter had his chance. (Photo by Peter Delaney/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Birds category. The Incubator Bird by Gerry Pearce, UK/Australia.

Most birds incubate their eggs with their bodies. Not so the Australian brush turkey, one of a handful of birds – the megapodes – that do it with an oven. Only the males oversee incubation. In this case, a male had chosen to create his nest-mound near Gerry’s home in Sydney, bordering Garigal national park. If he and his mound were to females’ liking, they would lay a clutch of eggs inside. In this picture, he is piling on more insulation to raise the temperature. (Photo by Gerry Pearce/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles category. The Ancient Ritual by Brian Skerry, USA.

Like generations before her, the leatherback turtle moves steadily back to the ocean. Leatherbacks are the largest, deepest-diving and widest-ranging sea turtles. Much of their lives are spent at sea, shrouded in mystery. When mature, females return to the shores where they themselves hatched to lay their own eggs. Sandy Point national wildlife refuge on St Croix, in the US Virgin Islands, provides critical nesting habitat. (Photo by Brian Skerry/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animals in Their Environment category. The Night Raider by Marcio Cabral, Brazil.

For three seasons, Marcio had camped out in Brazil’s Cerrado region, on the vast treeless savannah of Emas national park, waiting to capture the termite mounds’ light display. Click beetle larvae living in the outer layers of the mounds flash their bioluminescent “headlights” to lure in prey – the flying termites. Out of the darkness ambled a giant anteater, oblivious of Marcio in his hide, and began to attack the tall, concrete-mud mound with its powerful claws to reach the termites deep inside. (Photo by Marcio Cabral/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Mammals category. Giant Gathering by Tony Wu, USA.

Dozens of sperm whales mingled noisily off Sri Lanka’s northeast coast, stacked as far down as Tony could see. This was a congregation of dozens of social units, like a gathering of the clans. Aggregations like this could be a critical part of the whales’ rich social lives but are rarely reported. Some two thirds of the population was wiped out before commercial whaling was banned in 1986. This kind of major gathering could be “a sign that populations are recovering”, says Tony. (Photo by Tony Wu/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Plants and Fungi category. Tapestry of Life by Dorin Bofan, Romania.

Dorin was in Hamnøy in the Lofoten islands, Norway, when the clouds parted, allowing shafts of sunlight to fall on to the great walls of metamorphic rock, lighting up the swathes of vegetation coating the canyon and its slopes. The mountains here rise steeply from the sea yet mountain birches manage to gain a foothold. This mountain variety of downy birch is relatively small, and here in its autumn colours, is glowing gold. (Photo by Dorin Bofan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Underwater category. The Jellyfish Jockey by Anthony Berberian, France.

In open ocean far off Tahiti, French Polynesia, Anthony regularly dives at night in water more than 2km (1.2 miles) deep. His aim is to photograph deep-sea creatures – tiny ones that feed on plankton. This lobster larva, at the phyllosoma stage, just 1.2cm across, was gripping the dome of a small mauve stinger jellyfish. The pair were drifting in the current, but the phyllosoma also seemed able to steer the jelly. (Photo by Anthony Berberian/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Earth’s Environments category. The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.

Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica. Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed. When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. It took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene. (Photo by Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Black and White category. Polar Pas de Deux by Eilo Elvinger, Luxembourg.

From her ship anchored off Svalbard, in Arctic Norway, Eilo spotted a polar bear and her two- year-old cub in the distance, slowly drawing closer. Nearing the ship, they were diverted to a patch of snow soaked in leakage from the vessel’s kitchen and began to lick it. “I was ashamed of our contribution to the immaculate landscape,” says Eilo, “and of how this influenced the bears’ behaviour”. (Photo by Eilo Elvinger/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photojournalist: Single Image category. Palm-oil Survivors by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski, UK/USA.

On the island of Borneo, three generations of Bornean elephants cross the terraces of an oil-palm plantation being cleared for replanting. In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where most rainforest has been logged, the palm-oil industry is still a major driver of deforestation, squeezing elephants into smaller pockets of forest. Increasingly they come into conflict with humans, with elephants being shot or poisoned, and attacks on humans are also on the rise. (Photo by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/amazing-award-winning-photos-of-the-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2017-contest/

[ このページを翻訳 ]

Amazing Award-Winning Photos Of The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2017 Contest

11-14 years old category. Stuck In by Ashleigh Scully, USA.

Deep snow had blanketed the Lamar valley in Yellowstone national park, Wyoming, and the day was cold and overcast. This female American red fox was hunting beside the road, stepping quietly across the crusty surface of the snow. The image, says Ashleigh, “illustrates the harsh reality of winter life in Yellowstone”. (Photo by Ashleigh Scully/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner 2017 (Also Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Story category). Memorial to a Species by Brent Stirton, South Africa.

The killers were probably from a local community. Entering the Hluhluwe Imfolozi game reserve at night, they shot the black rhino bull using a silencer. Working fast, they hacked off the two horns and escaped. The horns would have been sold to a middleman and smuggled out of South Africa to China or Vietnam. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (Also winner 15-17 years old category). The Good Life by Daniel Nelson, The Netherlands.

Daniel met Caco in Odzala national park in the Republic of Congo. Here, Caco is feasting on a fleshy breadfruit. He is about nine years old and preparing to leave his family. Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered, threatened by illegal hunting for bushmeat, disease (notably the Ebola virus), habitat loss and the impact of climate change. (Photo by Daniel Nelson/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Invertebrates category. Crab Surprise by Justin Gilligan, Australia.

Out of the blue, an aggregation of giant spider crabs the size of a football field wandered past. Justin was documenting a University of Tasmania kelp transplant experiment and was taken by surprise. A Maori octopus seemed equally delighted with the unexpected bounty. It was having trouble choosing and catching a crab. Luckily for Justin, the stage was set with clear water and sunlight reflecting off the sand. (Photo by Justin Gilligan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

10 years and under category. The Grip of the Gulls by Ekaterina Bee, Italy.

Like all her family, five-and-a-half-year-old Ekaterina is fascinated by nature. On a boat trip off the coast of central Norway, her focus was on the cloud of herring gulls. They were after food, and as soon as Ekaterina threw them bread, they surrounded her. She liked the expression of the bird furthest away: “It looked very curious, as if it was trying to understand what was happening on the boat”. (Photo by Ekaterina Bee/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animal Portraits category. Contemplation by Peter Delaney, Ireland/South Africa.

Peter had spent a long, difficult morning tracking chimpanzees – part of a troop of some 250 – through Uganda’s Kibale national park. Totti was busy with vigorous courtship, pacing and gesticulating for a female in the canopy. It was only when he finally flopped down, worn out with unrequited love, that Peter had his chance. (Photo by Peter Delaney/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Birds category. The Incubator Bird by Gerry Pearce, UK/Australia.

Most birds incubate their eggs with their bodies. Not so the Australian brush turkey, one of a handful of birds – the megapodes – that do it with an oven. Only the males oversee incubation. In this case, a male had chosen to create his nest-mound near Gerry’s home in Sydney, bordering Garigal national park. If he and his mound were to females’ liking, they would lay a clutch of eggs inside. In this picture, he is piling on more insulation to raise the temperature. (Photo by Gerry Pearce/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles category. The Ancient Ritual by Brian Skerry, USA.

Like generations before her, the leatherback turtle moves steadily back to the ocean. Leatherbacks are the largest, deepest-diving and widest-ranging sea turtles. Much of their lives are spent at sea, shrouded in mystery. When mature, females return to the shores where they themselves hatched to lay their own eggs. Sandy Point national wildlife refuge on St Croix, in the US Virgin Islands, provides critical nesting habitat. (Photo by Brian Skerry/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animals in Their Environment category. The Night Raider by Marcio Cabral, Brazil.

For three seasons, Marcio had camped out in Brazil’s Cerrado region, on the vast treeless savannah of Emas national park, waiting to capture the termite mounds’ light display. Click beetle larvae living in the outer layers of the mounds flash their bioluminescent “headlights” to lure in prey – the flying termites. Out of the darkness ambled a giant anteater, oblivious of Marcio in his hide, and began to attack the tall, concrete-mud mound with its powerful claws to reach the termites deep inside. (Photo by Marcio Cabral/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Mammals category. Giant Gathering by Tony Wu, USA.

Dozens of sperm whales mingled noisily off Sri Lanka’s northeast coast, stacked as far down as Tony could see. This was a congregation of dozens of social units, like a gathering of the clans. Aggregations like this could be a critical part of the whales’ rich social lives but are rarely reported. Some two thirds of the population was wiped out before commercial whaling was banned in 1986. This kind of major gathering could be “a sign that populations are recovering”, says Tony. (Photo by Tony Wu/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Plants and Fungi category. Tapestry of Life by Dorin Bofan, Romania.

Dorin was in Hamnøy in the Lofoten islands, Norway, when the clouds parted, allowing shafts of sunlight to fall on to the great walls of metamorphic rock, lighting up the swathes of vegetation coating the canyon and its slopes. The mountains here rise steeply from the sea yet mountain birches manage to gain a foothold. This mountain variety of downy birch is relatively small, and here in its autumn colours, is glowing gold. (Photo by Dorin Bofan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Underwater category. The Jellyfish Jockey by Anthony Berberian, France.

In open ocean far off Tahiti, French Polynesia, Anthony regularly dives at night in water more than 2km (1.2 miles) deep. His aim is to photograph deep-sea creatures – tiny ones that feed on plankton. This lobster larva, at the phyllosoma stage, just 1.2cm across, was gripping the dome of a small mauve stinger jellyfish. The pair were drifting in the current, but the phyllosoma also seemed able to steer the jelly. (Photo by Anthony Berberian/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Earth’s Environments category. The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.

Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica. Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed. When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. It took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene. (Photo by Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Black and White category. Polar Pas de Deux by Eilo Elvinger, Luxembourg.

From her ship anchored off Svalbard, in Arctic Norway, Eilo spotted a polar bear and her two- year-old cub in the distance, slowly drawing closer. Nearing the ship, they were diverted to a patch of snow soaked in leakage from the vessel’s kitchen and began to lick it. “I was ashamed of our contribution to the immaculate landscape,” says Eilo, “and of how this influenced the bears’ behaviour”. (Photo by Eilo Elvinger/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photojournalist: Single Image category. Palm-oil Survivors by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski, UK/USA.

On the island of Borneo, three generations of Bornean elephants cross the terraces of an oil-palm plantation being cleared for replanting. In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where most rainforest has been logged, the palm-oil industry is still a major driver of deforestation, squeezing elephants into smaller pockets of forest. Increasingly they come into conflict with humans, with elephants being shot or poisoned, and attacks on humans are also on the rise. (Photo by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/amazing-award-winning-photos-of-the-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2017-contest/

[ このページを翻訳 ]

【動画】 「3分間ひたすら切り返しぶつけまくるアウディ」 投稿動画に衝撃走る

55
無免許の可能性。 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9874419.html

iPhone修理しに行ったら「これ他店で修理しました?」 まさかの事実が発覚し衝撃走る

66
スマホをバスターされる。 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9873970.html

自然現象から廃墟、微生物など。海外ネットユーザーをざわつかせた18枚のレア画像

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 世界は思ったより広くないと思うこともあるが、1人の人間が経験できることは限られている。ほとんど知ったような気になっていても、まだまだ「はじめて」は満ち溢れている。

 実はこれまでに見たことがあっても、日常に紛れ込んでしまい気が付かなかったり、素通りしてしまうこともある。

 だが、インターネットの荒波は、我々の浜辺に様々なものを運び込んでくれる。特に話題になったものは、興味があろうがなかろうが、その姿をさらけ出すのだ。
 
 これまで多くの海外ネットユーザーをざわつかせた驚くべき写真を見ていこう。
続きを読む

SOURCE: http://karapaia.com/archives/52262479.html

「こんな顔だった!?」 木村拓哉の顔がおかしい!整形した?とネット騒然ww

77
キムタクが「私が知ってるキムタクじゃない」――!? ツイッターで2018年7月18日、そんな驚きの声が続出することとなった。近日発売のファッション誌で表紙を飾っている木村拓哉さん(45)のルックスが、まるで「別人に見える」というのだ・・ 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9874365.html

蛇か?リスだ!沼に落ちたシマリスを助けた釣り人たち

dropped18

 
 某国某所で人間男性2名がボートで釣りなどを楽しんでいるところ、遠くで小さな生き物がこちらに向かってくるのが見えた。

 最初はヘビかと疑っていた男性たちだが、どうやら溺れているリスだと気づき急遽救出に向かった。 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://karapaia.com/archives/52262554.html

…このNY Dailyの1面の風刺漫画、いつか歴史の教科書に載ったりして。。;) 第1章 21世紀初頭の国際社会〜 第3節…



…このNY Dailyの1面の風刺漫画、いつか歴史の教科書に載ったりして。。;)

第1章 21世紀初頭の国際社会〜
第3節 「アメリカ帝国主義(パクス・アメリカーナ)の終焉」

…(笑) 第1節は 9/11〜「対テロ戦争」とアラブの春
ということで、西側社会とインターネットの希望を描き、
第2節はシリア内戦、ISの台頭と難民爆発、新ロシア南下政策から2016年のパリ・テロまでの西側民主主義文明の衰退を描くと、どうでしょうか;)

今回アメリカのジャーナリストが(さすがにFoxNewsも含めて)
怒っているのは、トランプがサミット後の記者会見でいつものお決まりの論法を使った、
つまり、批判を受けた時に、でもあっちにも悪い奴はいるじゃないか、あっちのほうが悪いじゃないか、と人の話にすり替える、という中学生的なものですが;)
それを今回、
ロシアが悪い悪いっていうけど、アメリカだって悪かったじゃないか、とやってしまった、
つまり、外国を侵略し、報道を規制し、選挙を操作し、外国で人を暗殺する、そんな国とモラルの点で同等に扱った
それがアメリカ人の逆鱗に触れた、ということだと思います。

いうまでもなく、トランプに与するつもりはまったく僕はありませんし(笑)
フランス人の友人にも、時々お前はアメリカ人だからなぁ…と嫌味をいわれたりするくらいで、アメリカや英語には、おそらくかなり親しいほうだと思うのですが、
今回の件はしかしふと、いや、それはそれでもいいかもしれない、、などと思ったりもします。
その心は(笑)
アメリカって、いつでも自分が正しい、っていう
まぁ、はっきりいって子どもじみたところがあって、
そこがアメリカらしいんだけど、アメリカ人と付き合っていても、ちょっと疲れちゃうところでもあった、
だいたい、いつも自分だけは絶対間違っていない、なんて、
僕が子どもの頃の日本共産党みたいなもんで、
やっぱりどこかちょっとおかしい(笑)

これからアメリカと、アメリカ中心で進んできた西側世界がどうなるかは大問題ですが、
長年の1アメリカ贔屓としては(笑)
もしかしてアメリカは、こうして図らずも、肩の重荷を降ろして、ちょっと楽になったりするのかね。。
などと思ったりもするのです…;)

(Image via Après le discours de Trump aux côtés de Poutine à Helsinki, les démocrates et plusieurs républicains scandalisés - huffingtonpost.fr)

yuichihiranaka:
この記事は面白かったですか? ソーシャルメディアでも更新をフォローして下さい。



…あの夏、ベルリン。。
2014年、ベルリン。文学、そして旅の記憶のラビリンス…。
ようこそ、旅行記と文学論の、ナラティヴな“街の迷路”へ。

『ベルリン日和』
“A moment.” …それは《気づき》の時。

作品についてのコメントはこちら

SOURCE: http://yuichihiranaka.tumblr.com/post/176019152614

Jorja Smith Lost & Found…



Jorja Smith Lost & Found (2018)

…この夏のテーマソングはこの1曲、タイトル・トラックで決まり、かも;)

#ジャケ買いOK

SOURCE: http://yuichihiranaka.tumblr.com/post/176018999342

人気ブロガーはあちゅうと事実婚の男優しみけん、浮気相手が103人の関係を暴露し騒然 未成年との行為も?

44
人気ブロガーで作家のはあちゅう(本名・伊藤春香)と男優のしみけん(本名・清水健)が15日、事実婚を発表した。結婚ではなく、“事実婚”ということから話題になった2人だが、早速しみけんの浮気疑惑が持ち上がっている・・ 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9874063.html

Its kinda hot in Greece (Source: https://ift.tt/2Ju5YnG)



Its kinda hot in Greece (Source: https://ift.tt/2Ju5YnG)

SOURCE: http://awwww-cute.tumblr.com/post/176018708751

伝説の一角獣。額に1本の巨大な角を持つシベリアユニコーン「エラスモテリウム」の謎に迫る

0_e3


 ジャイアントサイやジャイアント・シベリアユニコーンとも呼ばれるエラスモテリウム(E. sibiricum)は、鮮新世後期や更新世にユーラシア地域に生息した絶滅したサイの仲間である。

 260万年前の記録もあるが、最近発見されたほとんどの化石は2万9000年前頃のもので、マンモス並みの体の大きさを持ち、毛に覆われ、額から大きなツノが生えていたと考えられている。

 シベリアユニコーンの名はこれに由来する。最近の記述によると、体高2メートル、体長4.5メートル、体重はじつに4トンにも達したという。

 ここではエラスモテリウムの歴史とその巨大な角や絶滅の謎、更には世界各地に伝わる一角獣伝説に関して見ていこう。
続きを読む

SOURCE: http://karapaia.com/archives/52262542.html