Amazing Award-Winning Photos Of The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2017 Contest

11-14 years old category. Stuck In by Ashleigh Scully, USA.

Deep snow had blanketed the Lamar valley in Yellowstone national park, Wyoming, and the day was cold and overcast. This female American red fox was hunting beside the road, stepping quietly across the crusty surface of the snow. The image, says Ashleigh, “illustrates the harsh reality of winter life in Yellowstone”. (Photo by Ashleigh Scully/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner 2017 (Also Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Story category). Memorial to a Species by Brent Stirton, South Africa.

The killers were probably from a local community. Entering the Hluhluwe Imfolozi game reserve at night, they shot the black rhino bull using a silencer. Working fast, they hacked off the two horns and escaped. The horns would have been sold to a middleman and smuggled out of South Africa to China or Vietnam. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (Also winner 15-17 years old category). The Good Life by Daniel Nelson, The Netherlands.

Daniel met Caco in Odzala national park in the Republic of Congo. Here, Caco is feasting on a fleshy breadfruit. He is about nine years old and preparing to leave his family. Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered, threatened by illegal hunting for bushmeat, disease (notably the Ebola virus), habitat loss and the impact of climate change. (Photo by Daniel Nelson/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Invertebrates category. Crab Surprise by Justin Gilligan, Australia.

Out of the blue, an aggregation of giant spider crabs the size of a football field wandered past. Justin was documenting a University of Tasmania kelp transplant experiment and was taken by surprise. A Maori octopus seemed equally delighted with the unexpected bounty. It was having trouble choosing and catching a crab. Luckily for Justin, the stage was set with clear water and sunlight reflecting off the sand. (Photo by Justin Gilligan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

10 years and under category. The Grip of the Gulls by Ekaterina Bee, Italy.

Like all her family, five-and-a-half-year-old Ekaterina is fascinated by nature. On a boat trip off the coast of central Norway, her focus was on the cloud of herring gulls. They were after food, and as soon as Ekaterina threw them bread, they surrounded her. She liked the expression of the bird furthest away: “It looked very curious, as if it was trying to understand what was happening on the boat”. (Photo by Ekaterina Bee/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animal Portraits category. Contemplation by Peter Delaney, Ireland/South Africa.

Peter had spent a long, difficult morning tracking chimpanzees – part of a troop of some 250 – through Uganda’s Kibale national park. Totti was busy with vigorous courtship, pacing and gesticulating for a female in the canopy. It was only when he finally flopped down, worn out with unrequited love, that Peter had his chance. (Photo by Peter Delaney/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Birds category. The Incubator Bird by Gerry Pearce, UK/Australia.

Most birds incubate their eggs with their bodies. Not so the Australian brush turkey, one of a handful of birds – the megapodes – that do it with an oven. Only the males oversee incubation. In this case, a male had chosen to create his nest-mound near Gerry’s home in Sydney, bordering Garigal national park. If he and his mound were to females’ liking, they would lay a clutch of eggs inside. In this picture, he is piling on more insulation to raise the temperature. (Photo by Gerry Pearce/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles category. The Ancient Ritual by Brian Skerry, USA.

Like generations before her, the leatherback turtle moves steadily back to the ocean. Leatherbacks are the largest, deepest-diving and widest-ranging sea turtles. Much of their lives are spent at sea, shrouded in mystery. When mature, females return to the shores where they themselves hatched to lay their own eggs. Sandy Point national wildlife refuge on St Croix, in the US Virgin Islands, provides critical nesting habitat. (Photo by Brian Skerry/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animals in Their Environment category. The Night Raider by Marcio Cabral, Brazil.

For three seasons, Marcio had camped out in Brazil’s Cerrado region, on the vast treeless savannah of Emas national park, waiting to capture the termite mounds’ light display. Click beetle larvae living in the outer layers of the mounds flash their bioluminescent “headlights” to lure in prey – the flying termites. Out of the darkness ambled a giant anteater, oblivious of Marcio in his hide, and began to attack the tall, concrete-mud mound with its powerful claws to reach the termites deep inside. (Photo by Marcio Cabral/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Mammals category. Giant Gathering by Tony Wu, USA.

Dozens of sperm whales mingled noisily off Sri Lanka’s northeast coast, stacked as far down as Tony could see. This was a congregation of dozens of social units, like a gathering of the clans. Aggregations like this could be a critical part of the whales’ rich social lives but are rarely reported. Some two thirds of the population was wiped out before commercial whaling was banned in 1986. This kind of major gathering could be “a sign that populations are recovering”, says Tony. (Photo by Tony Wu/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Plants and Fungi category. Tapestry of Life by Dorin Bofan, Romania.

Dorin was in Hamnøy in the Lofoten islands, Norway, when the clouds parted, allowing shafts of sunlight to fall on to the great walls of metamorphic rock, lighting up the swathes of vegetation coating the canyon and its slopes. The mountains here rise steeply from the sea yet mountain birches manage to gain a foothold. This mountain variety of downy birch is relatively small, and here in its autumn colours, is glowing gold. (Photo by Dorin Bofan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Underwater category. The Jellyfish Jockey by Anthony Berberian, France.

In open ocean far off Tahiti, French Polynesia, Anthony regularly dives at night in water more than 2km (1.2 miles) deep. His aim is to photograph deep-sea creatures – tiny ones that feed on plankton. This lobster larva, at the phyllosoma stage, just 1.2cm across, was gripping the dome of a small mauve stinger jellyfish. The pair were drifting in the current, but the phyllosoma also seemed able to steer the jelly. (Photo by Anthony Berberian/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Earth’s Environments category. The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.

Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica. Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed. When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. It took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene. (Photo by Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Black and White category. Polar Pas de Deux by Eilo Elvinger, Luxembourg.

From her ship anchored off Svalbard, in Arctic Norway, Eilo spotted a polar bear and her two- year-old cub in the distance, slowly drawing closer. Nearing the ship, they were diverted to a patch of snow soaked in leakage from the vessel’s kitchen and began to lick it. “I was ashamed of our contribution to the immaculate landscape,” says Eilo, “and of how this influenced the bears’ behaviour”. (Photo by Eilo Elvinger/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photojournalist: Single Image category. Palm-oil Survivors by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski, UK/USA.

On the island of Borneo, three generations of Bornean elephants cross the terraces of an oil-palm plantation being cleared for replanting. In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where most rainforest has been logged, the palm-oil industry is still a major driver of deforestation, squeezing elephants into smaller pockets of forest. Increasingly they come into conflict with humans, with elephants being shot or poisoned, and attacks on humans are also on the rise. (Photo by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/amazing-award-winning-photos-of-the-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2017-contest/

[ このページを翻訳 ]

Amazing Award-Winning Photos Of The Wildlife Photographer Of The Year 2017 Contest

11-14 years old category. Stuck In by Ashleigh Scully, USA.

Deep snow had blanketed the Lamar valley in Yellowstone national park, Wyoming, and the day was cold and overcast. This female American red fox was hunting beside the road, stepping quietly across the crusty surface of the snow. The image, says Ashleigh, “illustrates the harsh reality of winter life in Yellowstone”. (Photo by Ashleigh Scully/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner 2017 (Also Wildlife Photojournalist Award: Story category). Memorial to a Species by Brent Stirton, South Africa.

The killers were probably from a local community. Entering the Hluhluwe Imfolozi game reserve at night, they shot the black rhino bull using a silencer. Working fast, they hacked off the two horns and escaped. The horns would have been sold to a middleman and smuggled out of South Africa to China or Vietnam. (Photo by Brent Stirton/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year (Also winner 15-17 years old category). The Good Life by Daniel Nelson, The Netherlands.

Daniel met Caco in Odzala national park in the Republic of Congo. Here, Caco is feasting on a fleshy breadfruit. He is about nine years old and preparing to leave his family. Western lowland gorillas are critically endangered, threatened by illegal hunting for bushmeat, disease (notably the Ebola virus), habitat loss and the impact of climate change. (Photo by Daniel Nelson/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Invertebrates category. Crab Surprise by Justin Gilligan, Australia.

Out of the blue, an aggregation of giant spider crabs the size of a football field wandered past. Justin was documenting a University of Tasmania kelp transplant experiment and was taken by surprise. A Maori octopus seemed equally delighted with the unexpected bounty. It was having trouble choosing and catching a crab. Luckily for Justin, the stage was set with clear water and sunlight reflecting off the sand. (Photo by Justin Gilligan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

10 years and under category. The Grip of the Gulls by Ekaterina Bee, Italy.

Like all her family, five-and-a-half-year-old Ekaterina is fascinated by nature. On a boat trip off the coast of central Norway, her focus was on the cloud of herring gulls. They were after food, and as soon as Ekaterina threw them bread, they surrounded her. She liked the expression of the bird furthest away: “It looked very curious, as if it was trying to understand what was happening on the boat”. (Photo by Ekaterina Bee/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animal Portraits category. Contemplation by Peter Delaney, Ireland/South Africa.

Peter had spent a long, difficult morning tracking chimpanzees – part of a troop of some 250 – through Uganda’s Kibale national park. Totti was busy with vigorous courtship, pacing and gesticulating for a female in the canopy. It was only when he finally flopped down, worn out with unrequited love, that Peter had his chance. (Photo by Peter Delaney/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Birds category. The Incubator Bird by Gerry Pearce, UK/Australia.

Most birds incubate their eggs with their bodies. Not so the Australian brush turkey, one of a handful of birds – the megapodes – that do it with an oven. Only the males oversee incubation. In this case, a male had chosen to create his nest-mound near Gerry’s home in Sydney, bordering Garigal national park. If he and his mound were to females’ liking, they would lay a clutch of eggs inside. In this picture, he is piling on more insulation to raise the temperature. (Photo by Gerry Pearce/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles category. The Ancient Ritual by Brian Skerry, USA.

Like generations before her, the leatherback turtle moves steadily back to the ocean. Leatherbacks are the largest, deepest-diving and widest-ranging sea turtles. Much of their lives are spent at sea, shrouded in mystery. When mature, females return to the shores where they themselves hatched to lay their own eggs. Sandy Point national wildlife refuge on St Croix, in the US Virgin Islands, provides critical nesting habitat. (Photo by Brian Skerry/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Animals in Their Environment category. The Night Raider by Marcio Cabral, Brazil.

For three seasons, Marcio had camped out in Brazil’s Cerrado region, on the vast treeless savannah of Emas national park, waiting to capture the termite mounds’ light display. Click beetle larvae living in the outer layers of the mounds flash their bioluminescent “headlights” to lure in prey – the flying termites. Out of the darkness ambled a giant anteater, oblivious of Marcio in his hide, and began to attack the tall, concrete-mud mound with its powerful claws to reach the termites deep inside. (Photo by Marcio Cabral/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Behaviour: Mammals category. Giant Gathering by Tony Wu, USA.

Dozens of sperm whales mingled noisily off Sri Lanka’s northeast coast, stacked as far down as Tony could see. This was a congregation of dozens of social units, like a gathering of the clans. Aggregations like this could be a critical part of the whales’ rich social lives but are rarely reported. Some two thirds of the population was wiped out before commercial whaling was banned in 1986. This kind of major gathering could be “a sign that populations are recovering”, says Tony. (Photo by Tony Wu/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Plants and Fungi category. Tapestry of Life by Dorin Bofan, Romania.

Dorin was in Hamnøy in the Lofoten islands, Norway, when the clouds parted, allowing shafts of sunlight to fall on to the great walls of metamorphic rock, lighting up the swathes of vegetation coating the canyon and its slopes. The mountains here rise steeply from the sea yet mountain birches manage to gain a foothold. This mountain variety of downy birch is relatively small, and here in its autumn colours, is glowing gold. (Photo by Dorin Bofan/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Underwater category. The Jellyfish Jockey by Anthony Berberian, France.

In open ocean far off Tahiti, French Polynesia, Anthony regularly dives at night in water more than 2km (1.2 miles) deep. His aim is to photograph deep-sea creatures – tiny ones that feed on plankton. This lobster larva, at the phyllosoma stage, just 1.2cm across, was gripping the dome of a small mauve stinger jellyfish. The pair were drifting in the current, but the phyllosoma also seemed able to steer the jelly. (Photo by Anthony Berberian/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Earth’s Environments category. The Ice Monster by Laurent Ballesta, France.

Laurent and his expedition team were working out of the Dumont d’Urville scientific base in east Antarctica. Ice shelves in the East Antarctic ice sheet are melting faster than scientists assumed. When Laurent spotted this small iceberg, he saw the chance to show for the first time the underwater part. It took three days to check the location, install a grid of lines from the seabed to buoys (so that Laurent could maintain a definite distance) and take the series of pictures to capture the scene. (Photo by Laurent Ballesta/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Black and White category. Polar Pas de Deux by Eilo Elvinger, Luxembourg.

From her ship anchored off Svalbard, in Arctic Norway, Eilo spotted a polar bear and her two- year-old cub in the distance, slowly drawing closer. Nearing the ship, they were diverted to a patch of snow soaked in leakage from the vessel’s kitchen and began to lick it. “I was ashamed of our contribution to the immaculate landscape,” says Eilo, “and of how this influenced the bears’ behaviour”. (Photo by Eilo Elvinger/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

Wildlife Photojournalist: Single Image category. Palm-oil Survivors by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski, UK/USA.

On the island of Borneo, three generations of Bornean elephants cross the terraces of an oil-palm plantation being cleared for replanting. In the Malaysian state of Sabah, where most rainforest has been logged, the palm-oil industry is still a major driver of deforestation, squeezing elephants into smaller pockets of forest. Increasingly they come into conflict with humans, with elephants being shot or poisoned, and attacks on humans are also on the rise. (Photo by Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/amazing-award-winning-photos-of-the-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-2017-contest/

[ このページを翻訳 ]

【動画】 クレヨンしんちゃん、成長したひまわり知ってる? 可愛すぎるww

9669541
ひまわり、しゃべる。 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9669541.html

お土産で買った「オオグソクムシせんべい」 その原材料に衝撃走るww

9720417
世界初となる深海珍味・・ 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9720417.html

He is a failed guide dog, failed for being too friendly (legit)…



He is a failed guide dog, failed for being too friendly (legit) But he now is a disability support dog and my newest best friend. Every day he enjoys a carrot because he is a very “good boy” (Source: http://ift.tt/2jz5DsS)

SOURCE: http://awwww-cute.tumblr.com/post/168471662269

貴乃花親方が沈黙を守る真相・・ 花田景子さんが明かしていた「封印された真実」

9720505
女将である花田景子さん(53)は全国で講演を行ってきた。夫が沈黙を守るなか粛々と講演を続けてきた。だが、それも限界だった。11月23日に愛媛県で、彼女は「連日の報道は本筋とズレているような気がします」と告白したのだ・・ 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9720505.html

【動画】 昨日の昌子の超ロングシュートww

9720953
<東アジアE-1選手権:日本2-1中国>◇12日◇味スタ
日本代表DF昌子源(25=鹿島)が、豪快な右足ミドルで代表初得点を挙げた・・ 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9720953.html

種が違ってもギュッ!ってすると伝わるね。心があたたかくなるね。人間と動物たちが抱きしめあう感動の瞬間映像総集編

0_e8


 動物は人間の言葉を話すことはできないが、気持ちを伝えるのに言葉はいらないのかもしれない。ただ心からギュっと抱き合うだけで、通じ合えるしわかりあえる。

 その愛情は、体温のぬくもりを通してダイレクトに伝わっていく。それはモニターを通しても、我々の心に響いてくる。

 ライオン、サル、おおかみ、クマ、牛、ブタ、オウムなど、人間と動物たちが抱き合う瞬間記録した映像の数々が、総集編としてYOUTUBEにまとめられていた。

 そこにあるのはやさしい世界。多くの感動を呼び話題となった映像なので見たことあるものも含まれているだろう。カラパイアで紹介したものもある。

 ただし映像の中にはクモやヘビ、ワニなども含まれている。
 特定の生き物が苦手な人は注意が必要だ。
 
  続きを読む

SOURCE: http://karapaia.com/archives/52250610.html

【動画】 ラブホテルで行われている男と女のやりとり・・ 投稿動画に衝撃走る

9720391
何もしないって言ったじゃん! 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9720391.html

【動画】 ラブホテルでやりとりされている男と女のやりとり・・ 投稿動画に衝撃走る

9720391
何もしないって言ったじゃん! 続きを読む

SOURCE: http://blog.livedoor.jp/gunbird/archives/9720391.html

Winning Photos Of The 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Of The Year Contest

Selected from over 11,000 entries, a wildlife photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park has been selected as the grand-prize winner of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore. He has won $10,000 and will have his winning image published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine and featured on the @NatGeo Instagram account.


A male orangutan peers from behind a tree while crossing a river in Borneo, Indonesia. (Photograph by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan, National Geographic Your Shot)

Bojan took the winning photo while he was about five feet deep in water after waiting patiently in the Sekoyner River in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia.

On capturing the photo, Bojan said, “Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.”

More info: National Geographic Nature Photographer Of The Year, Instagram


In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps. (Photograph by Todd Kennedy, National Geographic Your Shot)


Shortly before twilight in Kalapana, Hawai’i, a fragment of the cooled lava tube broke away, leaving the molten rock to fan in a fiery spray for less than half an hour before returning to a steady flow. (Photograph by Karim Iliya, National Geographic Your Shot)


Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of a tube-dwelling anemone in Hood Canal, Washington. (Photograph by Jim Obester, National Geographic Your Shot)


Snow-covered metasequoia trees, also called dawn redwoods, interlace over a road in Takashima, Japan. (Photograph by Takahiro Bessho, National Geographic Your Shot)


Sunlight glances off mineral strata of different colors in Dushanzi Grand Canyon, China. (Photograph by Yuhan Liao, National Geographic Your Shot)


Typically a shy species, a Caribbean reef shark investigates a remote-triggered camera in Cuba’s Gardens of the Queen marine protected area. (Photograph by Shane Gross, National Geographic Your Shot)


An adult Caribbean pink flamingo feeds a chick in Yucatán, Mexico. Both parents alternate feeding chicks, at first with a liquid baby food called crop milk, and then with regurgitated food. (Photograph by Alejandro Prieto, National Geographic Your Shot)


On the flanks of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i, the world’s only lava ocean entry spills molten rock into the Pacific Ocean. After erupting in early 2016, the lava flow took about two months to reach the sea, six miles away. (Photograph by Greg C., National Geographic Your Shot)


A summer thunderstorm unleashes lightning on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. (Photograph by Mike Olbinski Photography, National Geographic Your Shot)


Buoyed by the Gulf Stream, a flying fish arcs through the night-dark water five miles off Palm Beach, Florida. (Photograph by Michael Patrick O’Neill, National Geographic Your Shot)


Two grey herons spar as a white-tailed eagle looks on in Hungary. (Photograph by Bence Mate, National Geographic Your Shot)


Green vegetation blooms at the river’s edge, or riparian, zone of a meandering canyon in Utah. (Photograph by David Swindler, National Geographic Your Shot)


Migratory gulls take flight from a cedar tree being washed downstream by a glacial riverinBritish Columbia, Canada. (Photograph by Agathe Bernard, National Geographic Your Shot)


Morning fog blurs the dead trees of Romania’s Lake Cuejdel, a natural reservoir created by landslides. (Photograph by Gheorghe Popa, National Geographic Your Shot)


Preparing to strike, tarpon cut through a ribbon-like school of scad off the coast of Bonaire in the Caribbean Sea. (Photograph by Jennifer O’Neil, National Geographic Your Shot)


A Japanese macaque indulges in some grooming time on the shores of the famous hot springs. (Photograph by Lance McMillan, National Geographic Your Shot)


Sunset illuminates a lighthouse and rainbow in the Faroe Islands. (Photograph by Wojciech Kruczyński, National Geographic Your Shot)


A Portuguese man-of-war nears the beach on a summer morning; thousands of these jellyfish wash up on Australia’s eastern coast every year. (Photograph by Matthew Smith, National Geographic Your Shot)


A great gray owl swoops to kill in a New Hampshire field. (Photograph by Harry Collins, National Geographic Your Shot)

The post Winning Photos Of The 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer Of The Year Contest appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/12/winning-photos-2017-national-geographic-nature-photographer-year-contest/

Provocative And Glamour Photography By Oscar Bucaralook

Oscar Bucaralook is a talented photographer and retoucher who was born in Bucaramanga and currently lives and works in Medellín, Colombia. Oscar focuses on fashion, he shoots stunning beauty, glamour, nude and lifestyle portrait photography.

More info: Oscar Bucaralook, Behance (h/t: photogrist)












































































The post Provocative And Glamour Photography By Oscar Bucaralook appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/12/provocative-glamour-photography-oscar-bucaralook/