Choose The People’s Choice Award For Wildlife Photographer Of The Year

Choose the People’s choice award for Wildlife Photography of the Year. Browse the 25 photographs featured below and vote for the one you think should win this year’s People’s Choice Award.

More than 49,000 images are entered into Wildlife Photographer of the Year every year, but our panel of judges can only award 100 winners. Each year the Natural History Museum chooses an additional 25 of the best images from the latest competition shortlist. We then ask the public to help us select the recipient of the People’s Choice Award.

The winner will be announced on 10 February 2021.

Hare ball by Andy Parkinson

Andy spent five weeks watching the mountain hares near Tomatin in the Scottish Highlands, waiting patiently for any movement – a stretch, a yawn or a shake – which typically came every 30 to 45 minutes.

As he watched, frozen and prostrate, with 50 to 60 mph winds surging relentlessly around him, the cold started to distract and his fingers clasping the icy metal camera body and lens began to burn. Then relief came as this little female moved her body into a perfect spherical shape. A movement of sheer joy. Andy craves such moments: the isolation, the physical challenge and, most importantly, time with nature.

More: Wildlife Photographer Of The Year, Instagram, Facebook h/t: 121clicks

Family portrait by Andrew Lee

Capturing a family portrait of mum, dad and their eight chicks proved tricky for Andrew – they never got together to pose as a perfect 10.

Burrowing owls of Ontario, California often have large families so he knew it wouldn’t be easy. After many days of waiting, and when dad was out of sight, mum and her brood suddenly turned wide-eyed to glance in his direction – the first time he had seen them all together. He quickly seized the precious moment.

Baby on the rocks by Frédéric Larrey

When this six-month-old snow leopard cub wasn’t following its mother and copying her movements, it sought protection among the rocks.

This was the second family of snow leopards that Frédéric photographed on the Tibetan plateau in autumn 2017. Unlike other regions, where poaching is rife, there is a healthy breeding population in this mountain massif as the leopards are free from persecution by hunters and prey is plentiful.

Licence to kill by Britta Jaschinski

Britta’s photographs of items seized at airports and borders across the globe are a quest to understand why some individuals continue to demand wildlife products, even if this causes suffering and, in some cases, pushes species to the brink of extinction.

This zebra head was confiscated at a border point in the USA. Most likely, the hunter was not able to show proof that the zebra was killed with a license. Britta found the use of a shopping trolley to move the confiscated item ironic, posing the question: wildlife or commodity?

White danger by Petri Pietiläinen

While on a photography trip to the Norwegian archipelago, Svalbard, Petri had hoped to spot polar bears.

When one was sighted in the distance on a glacier, he switched from the main ship to a smaller rubber boat to get a closer look. The bear was making its way towards a steep cliff and the birds that were nesting there. It tried and failed several routes to reach them, but perseverance, and probably hunger, paid off as it found its way to a barnacle goose nest. Panic ensued as the adults and some of the chicks jumped off the cliff, leaving the bear to feed on what remained.

Turtle time machine by Thomas Peschak

During Christopher Columbus’s Caribbean voyage of 1494, green sea turtles were said to be so numerous that his ships almost ran aground on them.

Today the species is classified as endangered. However, at locations like Little Farmer’s Cay in the Bahamas, green turtles can be observed with ease. An ecotourism project run by fishermen (some who used to hunt turtles) uses shellfish scraps to attract the turtles to the dock. Without a time machine it is impossible to see the pristine turtle population, but Thomas hopes that this image provides just a glimpse of the bounty our seas once held.

Lion king by Wim van den Heever

As Wim watched this huge male lion lying on top of a large granite rock, a cold wind picked up and blew across the vast open plains of the Serengeti, Tanzania.

A storm was approaching and, as the last rays of sun broke through the cloud, the lion lifted its head and glanced in Wim’s direction, giving him the perfect portrait of a perfect moment.

A special moment by Oliver Richter

Oliver has observed the European beavers near his home in Grimma, Saxony, Germany, for many years, watching as they redesign the landscape to create valuable habitats for many species of wildlife including kingfishers and dragonflies.

This family portrait is at the beavers’ favourite feeding place and, for Oliver, the image reflects the care and love the adult beavers show towards their young.

Spirit of Bhutan by Emmanuel Rondeau

On assignment for WWF UK, Emmanuel’s brief was to photograph the elusive wildlife of the Bhutanese mountains.

Surprised to find a rhododendron at an altitude of 3,500 metres (11,500 feet), he installed a camera trap, hoping, although not overly confident, that the large mammals he was there for would use the very narrow forest path nearby. Returning many weeks later, Emmanuel was amazed to find a head-on picture of a takin, with the colours of blue sky, pink flowers and mustardyellow coat of the beast perfectly complementing one another.

Bat woman by Douglas Gimesy

Wildlife rescuer and carer Julie Malherbe takes a call to assist the next animal rescue while looking after three recently orphaned grey-headed flying-foxes.

This megabat is native to Australia and is endemic to the southeastern forested areas, playing a vital role in seed dispersal and the pollination of more than 100 native species of flowering and fruit bearing trees. Sadly, the species is listed as vulnerable to extinction because of the destruction of foraging and roosting habitats and, more frequently, mass die-offs caused by heat-stress events.

Border refuge by Joseph Dominic Anthony

Joseph formed the idea for this photograph in 2016 on a visit to Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong.

Taken within the Frontier Closed Area on the Chinese border, strictly timed access rules meant years of studying tide tables and waiting for the perfect weather. Joseph wanted to convey the story and mood of Mai Po in a single balanced photograph, combining individuals and the behaviour of multiple species in the context of their wider environment, particularly to juxtapose the proximity of the everencroaching urban development.

The alpha by Mogens Trolle

Of all the different primate species Mogens has photographed, the mandrill has proved the most difficult to reach, preferring to hide in tropical forests in remote parts of Central Africa.

This made the experience of sitting next to this impressive alpha, as he observed his troop above, even more special. When a male becomes alpha, he undergoes physical changes that accompany a rise in testosterone levels, and this results in the colours on his snout becoming much brighter. With the loss of status, the colours fade. Mogens used a flash to enhance the vivid colours and textures against the dark forest background.

Life saver by Sergio Marijuán Campuzano

As urban areas grow, like Jaen in Spain, threats to wildlife increase, and Iberian lynx have become a casualty of traffic accidents as they too seek to expand their own territories.

In 2019, over 34 lynx were run over, and three days before Sergio took this photo a two-year-old female lost her life not far from this spot. To combat mortality on the roads, improvements in the fencing and the construction of under-road tunnels are two proven solutions, and they are a lifeline for many other creatures as well as lynx.

A window to life by Sergio Marijuán Campuzano

Two Iberian lynx kittens, Quijote and Queen, play in the abandoned hayloft where they were born.

Extremely curious, but a bit scared as well, they started exploring the outside world through the windows of their straw-bale home. The reintroduction of the species to eastern Sierra Morena, Spain, has seen them, in more recent years, take advantage of some human environments. Their mother, Odrina, was also born in the hayloft, and her mother Mesta stayed with her for a whole year before leaving her daughter this safe and cosy place to raise her own family.

Drey dreaming by Neil Anderson

As the weather grew colder, two Eurasian red squirrels (only one is clearly visible) found comfort and warmth in a box Neil had put up in one of the pine trees near his home in the Scottish Highlands.

In the colder months, it’s common for the squirrels, even when unrelated, to share dreys. After discovering the box full of nesting material and in frequent use, Neil installed a camera and LED light with a diffuser on a dimmer. The box had a lot of natural light so he slowly increased the light to highlight his subjects – and using the WiFi app on his phone he was able take stills from the ground.

Bushfire by Robert Irwin

A fire line leaves a trail of destruction through woodland near the border of the Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve in Cape York, Queensland, Australia.

The area is of high conservation significance, with over 30 different ecosystems found there, and is home to many endangered species. The fires are one of the biggest threats to this precious habitat. Although natural fires or managed burns can be quite important in an ecosystem, when they are lit deliberately and without consideration, often to flush out feral pigs to hunt, they can rage out of control and have the potential to devastate huge areas.

Drawn and quartered by Laurent Ballesta

Scraps of grouper flesh fall from the jaws of two grey reef sharks as they tear the fish apart.

The sharks of Fakarava Atoll, French Polynesia, hunt in packs, but do not share their prey. A single shark is too clumsy to catch even a drowsy grouper. After hunting together to roust the grouper from its hiding place in the reef, the sharks encircle it, but then compete for the spoils – only a few sharks will have a part of the catch and most of them will remain unfed for several nights.

Resting dragon by Gary Meredith

The Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia is home to a wide variety of wildlife, which exists alongside man-made mining operations.

The wildlife found in this environment needs to adapt to the harsh, hostile living conditions. When the opportunity arises, the long-nosed dragon makes use of human structures. This individual positioned itself on a piece of wire mesh outside a workshop, waiting for the sun’s rays. The artificial light source outside the building attracts moths and insects, easy prey for a hungry lizard.

The real garden gnomes by Karine Aigner

Located a short ride from the Florida Everglades, USA, Marco Island is the largest and only developed land in Florida’s Ten Thousand Barrier Islands.

This Gulf Coast retreat offers luxury resorts, beautiful beaches, multimillion-dollar neighbourhoods and, surprisingly, a thriving community of Florida burrowing owls. The owls dig their own burrows and are happy to take up residence on meticulously manicured lawns, the perfect place to hunt insects and lizards. The Marco Island owls are the new neighbours, and their human friends are (mostly!) thrilled to have them around.

Coexistence by Pallavi Prasad Laveti

A cheeky Asian palm civet kitten peeps from a bag in a small remote village in India, curiosity and playfulness shining in its eyes.

This baby was orphaned and has lived its short life in the village backyard – comfortable in the company of locals, who have adopted the philosophy of ‘live and let live’. Pallavi sees the image as one of hope, for in other parts of the world the civets are trapped for Kopi Luwak coffee production (coffee made from coffee beans that are partially digested and then pooped out by the civet) – where they are contained in tiny, unsanitary battery cages and force fed a restricted diet of coffee beans. She feels this image portrays a true essence of cohabitation.

Close encounter by Guillermo Esteves

The worried looking expression on this dog’s face speaks volumes and is a reminder that moose are large, unpredictable, wild animals.

Guillermo was photographing moose on the side of the road at Antelope Flats in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA, when this large bull took an interest in the furry visitor – the driver of the car unable to move it before the moose made its approach. Luckily, the moose lost interest and went on its way after a few moments.

Eye to eye by Andrey Shpatak

This Japanese warbonnet was photographed in the north of the Gulf of Oprichnik in the Sea of Japan.

These unusual fish lead a territorial lifestyle among the stones and rocks of shallow coastal waters. They use their sharp-edged jaws to snap off sea cucumbers and gastropods. They were once thought to be timid and almost impossible to observe, but curiosity has taken over and they will now often swim right up to divers, who are usually startled by their extraordinary appearance.

Backstage at the circus by Kirsten Luce

At the Saint Petersburg State Circus, bear trainer Grant Ibragimov performs his daily act with three Siberian brown bears.

The animals rehearse and then perform under the lights each evening. In order to train a bear to walk on two feet, Kirsten was told that they are chained by the neck to the wall when they are young to strengthen their leg muscles. Russia and Eastern Europe have a long history of training bears to dance or perform, and hundreds of bears continue to do so as part of the circus industry in this part of the world.

Shut the front door by Sam Sloss

This coconut octopus was spotted walking around the black sand of the Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi carrying its house made of shells.

Remarkably, this small octopus constructs its own protective shelter using clam shells, coconuts, and even glass bottles! These intelligent creatures are very picky when it comes to choosing the perfect tools. They know that certain types and sizes of shell have their advantages, whether they be for shelter, camouflage, or concealing themselves from both prey and predator alike. It is safe to say that the coconut octopus is certainly one of the most scrappy, resourceful, and brainy creatures in the ocean.

The last goodbye by Ami Vitale

Joseph Wachira comforts Sudan, the last male northern white rhino left on the planet, moments before he passed away at Ol Pejeta Wildlife Conservancy in northern Kenya.

Suffering from age-related complications, he died surrounded by the people who had cared for him. With every extinction we suffer more than loss of ecosystem health. When we see ourselves as part of nature, we understand that saving nature is really about saving ourselves. Ami’s hope is that Sudan’s legacy will serve as a catalyst to awaken humanity to this reality.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/choose-the-peoples-choice-award-for-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year/

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1位は東京。世界で最も人口の多い都市トップ20

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 インタラクティブな製品やエクスペリエンスを作成するデザイン会社『CLEVER°FRANKE』は、世界で最も人口の多い都市を紹介する、インタラクティブマップを作成した。マップをスクロールすると、世界で最も人口の多い20の都市(2019年・2020年)が降順に表示される。

 トップ20というくらいだから、全てが人口過密都市であるわけだが、1位は東京、大阪は10位だったようだ。 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301855.html

ちょうどいいタイミング!思い出に残る動物たちの決定的瞬間をとらえた12の写真

ベストタイミング写真

credit: iklegemma/reddit

 それはいつ何時やってくるかわからない。だが図らずも、思い出に残るであろういい感じの瞬間が撮影できると、うれしくてみんなに共有したくなる。

 これらの写真は海外掲示板でシェアされた「お気に入りフォルダ」に入れてある素敵で意外で楽しい一コマである。 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301349.html

ゴージャスな巣作りの為、うたた寝中のキツネの目を盗み、毛を引っこ抜くシジュウカラ

うたた寝中のキツネから毛を引っこ抜くシジュウカラ
 キツネの毛皮はふわふわ、モフモフの上質素材なので、人間世界でもコートやマフラーに使用されることがあるが、その毛を欲しがるのは人間だけではなかったようだ。

 巣穴から出て日向ぼっこをしながらうたた寝をしているキツネに近づいてきたのは1羽のシジュウカラ。狙いはこの毛皮にあったようだ。

 キツネが寝ているのをいいことに、くちばしでその毛を引っこ抜いていく。途中キツネが目を覚ますと、さっと逃げるも、すぐにまた戻り、既定の量を集めるまでは何度も何度でも抜きに来る。
  続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301839.html

ロボットにボディータッチされると、ポジティブな感情が芽生えるという研究結果

人は、ロボットにやさしく触られるとポジティブな感情が芽生えるという研究

photo by Pixabay

 人と人が触れ合うスキンシップは、基本的に相手に対し好意を示す行為であり、海外では挨拶代わりにも使用されている。触れることでシンパシーを感じるというのは人間が持って生まれた特性のようなものだ。

 そしてその相手は人間に限ってのことではないようだ。例えそれがロボットであっても、優しく触れられれば、心が癒される思いがするという。 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301914.html

ドアの隙間から忍び寄る小さな肉球の数々。ドアを開けた瞬間、湧き出る子猫爆弾

ドアに忍び寄る小さな肉球、その正体は子猫の大群!


 その小さな肉球は開けてほしそうにドアの隙間からガサゴソを繰り返している。それだけでお茶椀1杯分くらいのブロッコリー飯が食べられそうだ。

 だがクライマックスはその後だ。猫がでてくることは予想できていたが、その数にうれしいびっくり!飼い主に甘えるその仕草にうらやまびっくりなのだ。 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301778.html

“Client Error”: The Superb Digital Artworks of RETOKA

“We are Retoka, Toni López and Zara Castellanos, designers and digital artists from Barcelona. We love to experiment with colors, light effects, shapes and movement. We try to create a visual language that gives meaning and personality to our work.”

More: Instagram, Behance, Foundation, Shop








































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/client-error-the-superb-digital-artworks-of-retoka/

Beautiful ’60s Fashion Photography by Henry Clarke

Model in pink dress, 1960

Born in Los Angeles in 1918, Henry Clarke, a renowned fashion photographer, discovered his calling in 1945 whilst working as an accessorist at Condé Nast in New York. During an encounter with the Cecil Beaton during a photography session at Vogue’s studio, Clarke was entranced by the photographic image. He promptly abandoned his fashion job, borrowed a Rolleiflex camera and began taking pictures.

h/t: vintag.es

Tamara Nyman, 1962

Deciding to try his luck abroad, Clarke moved to Paris in 1949. There his friend, Robert Randall, reintroduced him to the fashion world. He quickly found work at Fémina, L’Album de Figaro and Harper’s Bazaar.

Vogue, October 1962

The next year, Clarke began a collaboration with the French, English and American editions of Vogue that would last more than a quarter-century. With the help of women like Suzy Parker, Ann Sainte Marie and Bettina who were the most glamorous models of the day, he captured the elegance of the modern woman: young, lively, carefree and seductive.

Veruschka, 1964

In the 1960s, Diana Vreeland, the formidable editor of Vogue, sent him to such exotic locations as Syria, Iran, India and Mexico to create exciting fashion layouts.

Wilhelmina wearing a crêpe evening dress by Gustave Tassell, 1964

Upon his death in 1996, it was revealed that Henry Clarke had named the Institut Pasteur as universal legatee of his estate. He bequeathed his historical collection of photographs to the Musée de la Mode et du Costume in Paris.

These stunning photos are part of his work that Henry Clarke took portraits of classic beauties in the 1960s.

Verushka wearing an Emilio Pucci bikini top with a long wrapped skirt, the print is Egyptian inspired in purples, greens, yellows and white, Brazil, 1965

Editha Dussler wearing a brown and white Persian print jibba by Chombert, Valley Göreme, Turkey 1966

Editha Dussler wearing a dress by B.H. Wragge, 1966

Editha Dussler wearing a full skirted striped silk evening dress by Tiziani, 1966

Editha Dussler wearing Anne Fogarty, Valley Göreme, Turkey, 1966

Editha Dussler wearing Ellen Brooke, 1966

Editha Dussler wearing Hannah Troy, 1966

Editha Dussler, 1966

Model wearing a gown of sky-blue chiffon and a crystal beaded top by Pat Sandler, 1966

Model wearing a short silver sequined dress by Joan Arkin in the Valley Göreme, Turkey, Vogue, December 1, 1966

Model wearing orange Christian Dior dress, Istanbul, Turkey, Vogue, December 1966

Model wearing pants and top by Bill Blass, Turkey, 1966

Susan Murray wearing a slit print skirt and thin-strapped top by Emilio Pucci, 1966

Vogue, December 1966

Benedetta Barzini at Santa Maria di Gesu in Sicily, wearing a turquoise dress with a matching drawstring shaping a high waist by Leslie Fay and a wide brimmed turquoise hat by Till, 1967

Benedetta Barzini, 1967

Marisa Berenson, 1967

Model is standing between statues at the Villa Palagonia, Bagheria, Sicily, 1967

Samantha Jones in a caftan-inspired dress in colorful hand printed zigzag by Livio de Simone, rings and bracelets by Tiziani, India, Vogue, 1967

Samantha Jones, 1967

Simone D’Aillencourt in Emilio Pucci, 1967

Simone D’Aillencourt in Tiffeau, 1967

Simone D’Aillencourt, 1967

Sue Murray, Vogue summer look, Palermo, Italy, 1967

Maria Schiano in Revillion, 1968

Marina Schiano wearing a transparent evening chiffon pullover and pants in fuchsia by Adolfo, at Chichén Itzá, Mexico, outside the Temple of Warriors, 1968

Model wearing a blue coat with a circular pattern and a matching hat by Mila Schoen, 1968

Françoise Leroy, 1969

Marina Schiano, 1969

Marisa Berenson in Halston, 1969

Mary Ann Restivo, 1969

Model in a Bill Blass silk organza dress, 1969

Moyra Swan, 1969

Moyra Swan, 1969

Moyra Swan, 1969

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/beautiful-60s-fashion-photography-by-henry-clarke/

“Self-Portraits 2050”: Stunning 3D Series by Omar Aqil

Omar Aqil is an illustrator & art director based in Lahore, Pakistan. With this new series titled: ‘Self-Portraits 2050’, we follow Omar through this experimental journey and I totally dig them. It’s playful, filled with details and easter eggs of some sort. Overall it’s just an ‘assemble’ of beautiful and stunning pieces.

More: Instagram, Foundation h/t: abduzeedo





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/self-portraits-2050-stunning-3d-series-by-omar-aqil/

ある意味最強の生物兵器。犯罪組織が台湾の飲食店内に千匹以上のゴキブリを放つ(※ゴキブリ出演中)

台湾の飲食店に暴力組織が千匹以上のゴキブリを放つ


 ゴキブリだけは絶対に嫌!という人は多いだろう。飲食店にとって店内にゴキブリがいるとしたら、それは店の存続の危機に関わるほど重大な事態だ。使い方によってテロを起こすほどができるほど、ゴキブリはある種の生物兵器となりうるのである。

 で、実際にゴキブリを使用した恐ろしいテロが行われていたようだ。

 台湾の飲食店に、千匹以上のゴキブリが犯罪組織によってばらまかれたという。その背景には、金銭トラブルがあったようだ。「Focus Taiwan」などが伝えている。 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301840.html

【音量注意】猫たちにとある音声を聞かせてみた。猫まっしぐらに飛んでくるらしい?

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 TikTokでトレンドになっていたらしいのが、この音声を猫たちに聞かせてみたら、みんな猫まっしぐらに飛んできた!っていうシリーズだ。

 それをまとめた映像を紹介するので、良かったら一度見てみてね。なお、結構ボリュームが大きいので、音量注意でお願いするよ! 続きを読む

SOURCE: https://karapaia.com/archives/52301909.html