Portraits of Swiss “Halbstarken” Girls With Very Big Hair in the 1950s and 1960s

Halbstarke is a German term describing a postwar-period subculture of adolescents – mostly male and of working class parents – that appeared in public in an aggressive and provocative way during the 1950s in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Later, the term sometimes described youths in general.

h/t: vintag.es

Often, the Halbstarken wore a quiff, jeans, checked shirts and leather jackets. Their look separated them from the other, more widespread, German youth culture. Mopeds and motorbikes were very popular and used for riding in ‘gangs’ (as seen in American movies). Because there weren’t a lot of alternatives, the Halbstarken often spent their leisure time outdoors. Their cliques met at corners of the road, in parks or at other public places. This behavior wasn’t appreciated by elder citizens and so they described it as “bumming around”.

These photographs were taken by Karlheinz Weinberger (1921–2006) who began to take pictures as a teenager and became a member of the Bund der Naturfreunde photography club where he improved his technique.

In the 1940s, he joined the famous Zürich underground gay club “Der Kreis” and began to publish his photos in its magazine under the pseudonym of Jim. In the late 1950s, he met young misfits on the street and began to photograph them, in studio at his mother’s apartment or during their trips in the Swiss countryside. Working all his life as a warehouseman for the Siemens factory, he devoted all his spare time to his photographic passion for eccentricity. For more than thirty years, Karlheinz Weinberger followed these young people, who reused the codes of Rebel Without a Cause and created inventive and provocative outfits.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/portraits-of-swiss-halbstarken-girls-with-very-big-hair-in-the-1950s-and-1960s/

Amazing Photos of the Third Generation of the Ford Thunderbird, 1961-1963

The third generation of the Ford Thunderbird is a personal luxury car produced by Ford for the 1961 to 1963 model years. It featured new and much sleeker styling (done by Bill Boyer) than the second generation models. Sales were strong, if not quite up to record-breaking 1960, at 73,051 including 10,516 convertibles.

h/t: vintag.es

A new, larger 390 cu in (6.4 L) FE-series V8 was the only engine available (in 1961). The Thunderbird was 1961’s Indianapolis 500 pace car, and featured prominently in US President John F. Kennedy’s inaugural parade, probably aided by the appointment of Ford executive Robert McNamara as Secretary of Defense. It shared some styling cues with the much smaller European Ford Corsair.

It was replaced by the 4th generation Thunderbird for model year 1964. Here is a set of amazing photos of the third generation of the Ford Thunderbird (1961-1963).
























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/amazing-photos-of-the-third-generation-of-the-ford-thunderbird-1961-1963/

Sensual Black and White Portrait Photos of Goldie Hawn Taken by Joseph Klipple in 1964

Born 1945 in Washington, D.C., Goldie Hawn began taking ballet and tap dance lessons at the age of three and danced in the corps de ballet of the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo production of The Nutcracker in 1955. She made her stage debut in 1964, playing Juliet in a Virginia Shakespeare Festival production of Romeo and Juliet.

h/t: vintag.es

By 1964, Hawn ran and taught in a ballet school, having dropped out of American University where she was majoring in drama. In 1964, Hawn made her professional dancing debut in a production of Can-Can at the Texas Pavilion of the New York World’s Fair. She began working as a professional dancer a year later and appeared as a go-go dancer in New York City and at the Peppermint Box in New Jersey.

Before becoming a famous actress, these beautiful photos are portraits of American dancer and dance instructor Goldie Hawn taken by Joseph Klipple, Washington D.C. on May 28, 1964.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/sensual-black-and-white-portrait-photos-of-goldie-hawn-taken-by-joseph-klipple-in-1964/

Still Life in 1960s New York in Beautiful Memorabilia Photographs by Evelyn Hofer

In the 1960s and 70s, German-born photographer Evelyn Hofer (January 21, 1922 – November 2, 2009) pointed her lens at New York City’s people and places. The pictures show us the city, and let New Yorkers know how the rest of the world saw them. You can see these and more photographs in Evelyn Hofer: New York.

h/t: flashbak

Hotdog stand, 1963, New York

Car park, 1964, New York

Arteries, 1964, New York

View from FDR Drive downtown, 1964, New York

Modern Babylon, 1964, New York

Santo Domingo in New York, 1964

Policeman, 59th Street, 1964, New York

Man on roof, 1981, New York

L train station, New York, 1964

The Bowery, 1963, New York

Three boys at the front door, 1975, New York

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/still-life-in-1960s-new-york-in-beautiful-memorabilia-photographs-by-evelyn-hofer/

Back When the Rotor Rides Were Fun and Dangerous!

The Rotor is an amusement park ride, designed and patented by German engineer Ernst Hoffmeister in 1948. The ride was first demonstrated at Oktoberfest 1949, and was exhibited at fairs and events throughout Europe, during the 1950s and 1960s. The ride still appears in numerous amusement parks, although traveling variants have been surpassed by the Gravitron.

h/t: vintag.es

The ride itself was a scientific experience as riders felt the force of centripetal acceleration seemingly sticking them to the wall. What is happening on the rotor falls in line with Newtonian physics in that a body in motion remains in motion unless acted upon by a resisting force.

A rider traveling around the drum of a rotor is constantly changing the direction of their motion but at any given point Newtonian laws state that they would prefer, if unhindered, to continue traveling in the direction they are traveling at that particular moment in time. However, every split second whilst the ride spins the planar vector that defines what is perpendicular keeps changing, thus the rider feels that they are being pushed outwards against the wall of the drum.

The sequence of the ride varied in the early machines. Some loaded at the top with the floor dropping as the riders are pinned to the wall and as the ride slows the riders slip ungraciously down to the floor and exit in the pit of the drum. Others saw the floor lower and then return to allow riders a bit more dignity as they left via the top of the drum. Finally some machines loaded at the bottom, pushed the riders up with an elevating floor, which then descended and re-ascended to pick up the riders.











SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/back-when-the-rotor-rides-were-fun-and-dangerous/

Beautiful Photos of Julie Newmar as Catwoman in Batman TV Series, 1966–1968

The Catwoman is one Batman’s earliest comic book adversaries, initially appearing in Batman #1 (Spring 1940), and became the best-known and most frequently seen Batman villain. Catwoman is one of Gotham City’s most prominent villains appearing in 15 episodes (12 of which are Julie Newmar).

h/t: vintag.es

Julie Newmar taking the role: “I had lived in New York at the time on Beekman Place, I remember it was a weekend, Friday or Saturday, and my brother had come down from Harvard with five or six of his friends, and we were all sitting around the sofa, just chatting away, when the phone rang. I got up and answered it , and it was the agent or someone in Hollywood, who said, Miss Newmar, would you like to play the Catwoman on the Batman series? They are casting it out here. I was insulted because he said it starts Monday. I said ‘What is this?’

That’s how television is done: they never know what the are doing until yesterday. My brother leapt off the sofa. I mean he physically levitated and said BATMAN! that’s our favorite show at Harvard. We all quit our classes and quit our studies and run into the TV room and watch the show. I said , ‘They want me to play Catwoman.’ He said DO IT! So I said ‘O.K. I’ll do it.’”

Julie’s first roles in film and television were typically uncredited dance roles in the 1950s, her first credited role was playing one of the brides in the 1954 film Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. Her first appearance on Broadway came in 1955 production of Silk Stockings. Before appearing on Batman in 1966 she made appearances in TV series such as; Route 66 (1962), The Twilight Zone (1963) and My Living Doll (1965).

After being Catwoman on the first two seasons of Batman (1966-1967), Julie continued to appear on film and TV (mostly guest star appearances) throughout the 1970s and 1980s.

Julie returned to Batman related productions for the 2003 TV movie Return to the Batcave and the animated 2016 movie Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders.

“Cats are sleek, cats are fast. Cats are… well… they aren’t mean their just wiley. And they will grab your attention in the most seductive way.” – Newmar


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/beautiful-photos-of-julie-newmar-as-catwoman-in-batman-tv-series-1966-1968/

Candid Photographs Captured Prostitution Scenes in Paris in 1966

Prostitution in Paris, both street prostitution and prostitution from dedicated facilities has a long history but also its own modernity in the French capital. Prostitutes are mostly women but also include transgender people and men.

h/t: vintag.es

Of men born between 1920 and 1925, one in five had experienced his first sexual relationship in a maison-close. Paris accommodated many brothels until their prohibition in 1946 following the introduction of the Loi Marthe Richard. 195 establishments were then closed in Paris. Among the most famous are the One-Two-Two, Le Chabanais, Le Sphinx and La Fleur blanche.

From 1960, in the debates over prostitution in France, “abolition” was used to refer to both the abolition of laws and regulations that make any distinction between someone involved in prostitution and the general population, and the abolition of prostitution itself. At that time, police files on prostitutes were finally destroyed.

However, implementation varied considerably locally, although prostitution was rarely on the political agenda over the next 30 years. Exceptions were the demonstrations of prostitutes rights movements against police harassment in 1975, and periodic calls by individual politicians for re-opening the “maisons”.




































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/candid-photographs-captured-prostitution-scenes-in-paris-in-1966/

Homes of the Future: A Look Back at Charles Schridde’s Stunning ‘60s Ads For Motorola

Charles Schridde was born in 1926 and grew up in rural Illinois. He was an artist from an early age and received a scholarship to the Chicago Art Institute when he was age 17.

He began at the institute, but was then enlisted in the Navy for two years. When he returned from the Navy, Charles began his career as a free-lance commercial illustrator. His major clients included The Saturday Evening Post, Life magazine, Motorola and Chevrolet.

h/t: vintag.es

In 1961, Motorola asked Charles Schridde to envision the homes of the future centered around Motorola’s most recent line of electronics. The ads created by Schridde ran in Life Magazine and The Saturday Evening Post from 1961 to 1963 and depicted an optimistic future made of lavish, elegant, dream-homes, where domestic technologies and serene landscapes coexisted harmoniously.

Through his stunning drawings, we were offered a fascinating glimpse of what the past thought the future would be like, and how home technology companies capitalized on their consumers’ minds by swaying them in the direction that these electronic products were relevant to that ultimate future.


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/homes-of-the-future-a-look-back-at-charles-schriddes-stunning-60s-ads-for-motorola/

A Photo Set of The 1960 Dodge Dart Phoenix D-500, a Reflection of The Jet-Age Styling of The Late 1950s

The 1960s opened with great promise. The Dodge Dart was a new model that year, based on a mid-sized 118-inch wheelbase unibody design adopted from Plymouth, and the Phoenix was the premium trim package for it. This special Phoenix was further equipped with the performance-oriented D500 package; indeed, this amazing motorcar features not only its original drivetrain and sheet-metal, but nearly every available option that could be added to this vehicle platform in 1960.

h/t: vintag.es

Dodge created 586 Phoenix D500-optioned Darts in 1960, but few were as spectacular as this one. The car is equipped with the 383/330 HP V-8 engine with Chrysler’s special long-tube D500 ram induction, which featured dual 4-barrel carburetors mounted on sonically tuned cast manifolds that looped across each opposing valve cover. It is backed by the pushbutton-activated TorqueFlite automatic transmission.

The car, featuring its Ghia-inspired finned-and-piped panels as executed by designer Virgil Exner, is painted red and augmented by front bumper guards, backup lights, door-edge moldings and dual side mirrors; lower-body stone shields and deluxe wheel covers complete the picture of Dodge luxury.

Inside are red interior components, complete with rare power-swivel front seats, power windows, factory electric clock, foam-cushioned rear seat and an Astrophonic AM Radio with rear-seat speaker. Driving ease was accomplished with power steering and power brakes.

Here is a photo set of the 1960 Dodge Dart Phoenix D-500, a reflection of the jet-age styling of the late 1950s and the cataclysms that brought about the legendary Chrysler products of the 1960s.







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/a-photo-set-of-the-1960-dodge-dart-phoenix-d-500-a-reflection-of-the-jet-age-styling-of-the-late-1950s/

Walter Pichler’s Futuristic Visions from the ’60s

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

Prototypes, a series of sculptures made in the ’60s by Walter Pichler, explore the overlap of architecture/design/sculpture. The materials (polyester, Plexiglas, PVC, aluminum, inflatable elements) used by the Austrian artist were new at the time.

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

Around forty-five years ago a man wore a submarine-like white helmet that extended from front to back. His entire head disappeared into the futurist capsule; only the title betraying what was happening. TV Helmet created in 1967 is a technical device that isolates the user while imbedding him or her in an endless web of information: closed off against the outside world, the wearer was completely focused on the screen before his eyes.

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

TV Helmet is the work of Walter Pichler and it doesn’t merely formally anticipate the cyber glasses developed decades later; Pichler also articulated questions of content in relation to the media experience long before the “virtual world” was even discovered. Even back then, Walter Pichler was probably already a media critic as he’s remained one to this day. But he is also a conceptually thinking artist who explored space early on—beyond the four walls and the structures of cities. Pichler called his invention a Portable Living Room. His pioneering designs, The Prototypes, are pneumatic plastic living bubbles from the sixties that sought answers to the questions of tomorrow’s individualized life somewhere between the areas of design, architecture, and art. With their reference to space travel and modernist materials, Pichler’s futurist sculptures inspire a desire for the future— even if his messages are said to possess a sceptical or sarcastic undertone.

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

Pichler wrote these words in 1962, on the eve of an exhibition on which he collaborated with fellow Viennese architect Hans Hollein.

“(Architecture) is born of the most powerful thoughts. For men it will be a compulsion, they will stifle in it or they will live – live, as I mean the word … (Architecture) has no consideration for stupidity and weakness. It never serves. It crushes those who cannot bear it… Machines have taken possession of [architecture] and human beings are now merely tolerated in its domain. “

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

A statement of singular nihilism, unabashed iconoclasm; a statement Ulrich Conrads once called “the most absolute thesis” in all twentieth century architecture. In the sixties, after studying at the Hochschule für Architektur in Vienna, he worked with his friend, the internationally renowned architect Hans Hollein, on a new concept of architecture. In 1963, the two exhibited together at the Galerie nächst St. Stephan under the title Architecture. Hollein and he explored utopian architectonic designs; they countered the growing subdivision of the city with a larger modernist vision made from cement, declaring architecture “freed from the constraints of building.”

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

TV Helmet/Portable Living Room (1967) and Small Room (1967) are to be worn, while the unrealized Intensivbox is a spherical chamber into which a subject is slid on a track. These isolating simulators remove one from a given reality and can be seen as the ultimate conclusion of technology’s encroachment on the body. Constructed of plastic and embedded with television sets and speakers, these helmets enhance the television experience to the detriment of all else. Pichler hoped to isolate and insulate himself (and his viewers) from the pitfalls of consumerism and media obsession, but in his helmets this took the form of a literal representation of such pitfalls. The “consumer” is isolated from her environment, but within the helmet only media are permitted as input. These works can are also a critique of his one-time collaborator Hans Hollein’s ironic assertion that “everything is architecture.”

Head of the Movable Figure

Walter Pichler (Courtesy Contenporary Fine Arts, Berlin. Photo: Elfie Semotan)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/walter-pichlers-futuristic-visions-from-the-60s/