Beautiful Photos of the Lincoln Continental Mark V

The Continental Mark V is a personal luxury coupe that was marketed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company from the 1977 to 1979 model years in North America. The fourth generation Mark series, the Mark V was derived from its Continental Mark IV predecessor, bringing an extensive update to the interior and exterior design. While only sold for three years, the Mark V is the best-selling generation of the Mark series, with 228,262 examples produced.

h/t: vintag.es


At 230 inches long, the Mark V is the largest two-door coupe ever sold by Ford Motor Company, with the 233-inch long two-door and four-door Lincoln Continental sedans (produced alongside it) as the only longer vehicle ever marketed by Ford.

Distinguished by its sharp-edged exterior design, design themes of the Mark V would be adapted onto Lincoln vehicles throughout the 1980s. For 1980, the Mark V was replaced by the Continental Mark VI. As the Mark series underwent downsizing in the interest of fuel economy, the Mark VI saw significant reductions in exterior dimensions.

All Continental Mark Vs were assembled alongside the Lincoln Continental at the now-closed Wixom Assembly Plant in Wixom, Michigan.












SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/beautiful-photos-of-the-lincoln-continental-mark-v/

Haunting Photographic Self-Portraits by Francesca Woodman From the 1970s

Francesca Woodman (April 3, 1958 – January 19, 1981) is best known for photographing herself. But her pictures are not self-portraits in the traditional sense. She is often nude or semi-nude and usually seen half hidden or obscured – sometimes by furniture, sometimes by slow exposures that blur her figure into a ghostly presence. These beautiful and yet unsettling images seem fleeting but also suggest a sense of timelessness.

h/t: vintag.es

Woodman took her first self-portrait at age thirteen and continued photographing herself until she died. She attended public school in Boulder, Colorado, between 1963 and 1971, except for second grade, which she attended in Italy, where the family spent many summers between school years. She began high school in 1972 at Abbot Academy, a private Massachusetts boarding school. There, she began to develop her photographic skills and became interested in the art form. Abbot Academy merged with Phillips Academy in 1973; Woodman graduated from the public Boulder High School in 1975.

Through 1975, she spent summers with her family in Italy in the Florentine countryside, where the family lived on an old farm, and many of her photographs were taken there. European culture and art had a significant impact on her artistic development. The influence of surrealist art, particularly the photographs of Man Ray and Claude Cahun can be seen in the themes and style of her work. She developed her ideas and skills as a student at Rhode Island School of Design.

Although Woodman used different cameras and film formats during her career, most of her photographs were taken with medium format cameras producing 2-1/4 by 2-1/4 inch (6×6 cm) square negatives. Woodman created at least 10,000 negatives, which her parents now keep. Woodman’s estate, which is managed by her parents, consists of over 800 prints, of which only around 120 images had been published or exhibited as of 2006. Most of Woodman’s prints are 8 by 10 inches (20 by 25 cm) or smaller, which “works to produce an intimate experience between viewer and photograph.” Many of Woodman’s images are untitled and are known only by a location and date.

Woodman continuously explored and tested what she could do with photography. She challenged the idea that the camera fixes time and space – something that had always been seen as one of the fundamentals of photography. She playfully manipulated light, movement and photographic effects, and used carefully selected props, vintage clothing and decaying interiors to add a mysterious gothic atmosphere to the work.

Her importance as an innovator is significant, particularly in the context of the 1970s when the status of photography was still regarded as less important than painting and sculpture. She led the way for later American artists who used photography to explore themes relating to identity such as Cindy Sherman and Nan Goldin.

On January 19, 1981, Woodman took her life, aged twenty-two, jumping out of a loft window of a building on the East Side of New York City. An acquaintance wrote, “things had been bad, there had been therapy, things had gotten better, guard had been let down. Her father has suggested that Woodman’s suicide was related to an unsuccessful application for funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. A lackluster response to her photography and a failed relationship had pushed her into the deep depression.























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/haunting-photographic-self-portraits-by-francesca-woodman-from-the-1970s/

Vintage Snaps Capture Life at Venice Beach in 1970

The smell of the ocean, the feel of sand on your feet and the burning of incense bring back the memories of a golden era in Venice Beach. These vintage snapshots were taken by Howard Gribble that show life at Venice Beach in 1970.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/vintage-snaps-capture-life-at-venice-beach-in-1970/

Retro Photos Show the Inside of Offices in the 1970s and ’80s

The office has transformed dramatically since the 1970s: in layout, in culture and in technology. It was a decade that saw the worker become more individualistic, with office design becoming more ergonomic and also getting some ‘pop’ in color. The computer was at the start of its journey that would change everything, and therefore so were the working processes.

These photographs from the Melbourne Harbour Trust series in the Public Record Office Victoria collection reveal some of the office spaces and work products being used by Port of Melbourne Authority (PMA) employees at their Market Street offices in the 1970s and ’80s and World Trade Centre location from 1983.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es




























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/retro-photos-show-the-inside-of-offices-in-the-1970s-and-80s/

Photos of Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin During the Filming of ‘Zabriskie Point’, 1970

Zabriskie Point is a 1970 American drama film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni and starring Mark Frechette, Daria Halprin, and Rod Taylor. It was widely noted at the time for its setting in the counterculture of the United States. Some of the film’s scenes were shot on location at Zabriskie Point in Death Valley.

h/t: vintag.es

The film was an overwhelming commercial failure, and was panned by most critics upon release. Its critical standing has increased, however, in the decades since. It has to some extent achieved cult status and is noted for its cinematography, use of music, and direction.

Following prolonged publicity and controversy in North America throughout its production, Zabriskie Point had its premiere at Walter Reade’s Coronet Theatre in New York City on February 5, 1970, almost four years after Antonioni began pre-production and over a year and a half after shooting began, before being generally released on February 9, 1970. Despite the explicit language and sexual content, the film received an R rating rather than an X, in a shift in the MPAA’s policy.


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/photos-of-mark-frechette-and-daria-halprin-during-the-filming-of-zabriskie-point-1970/

Creative Fashion Designs by Kansai Yamamoto in the Early 1970s

Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto (February 8, 1944 – July 21, 2020) was a fixture of the 1970s and ’80s fashion scene, and his avant-garde kimonos gained popularity thanks to one big-name fan: David Bowie.

h/t: vintag.es

Yamamoto’s floaty womenswear creations helped cement Bowie’s androgynous look during his Ziggy Stardust tour, and a long-term relationship was born. “Color is like the oxygen we are both breathing in the same space,” Kansai once said of his work with Bowie.

Kansai opened his first boutique in Tokyo in 1968 and eventually expanded worldwide. His collections debuted in the United States in 1971 at Hess’s in Allentown, Pennsylvania, a department store known for its controversial fashion shows of American and European styles selected for their potential to influence ready-to-wear clothing designs.

That same year Kansai became the first Japanese designer to show in London, where his clothing was seen by David Bowie; Bowie later commissioned Kansai to create the wardrobe for his Ziggy Stardust stage persona. The designer was again featured in Hess’s showing of Asian trendsetting fashions for fall/winter 1973 at One World Trade Center in New York. All of the Kansai ensembles on view in this gallery were modeled at the New York event; several were shown earlier in London.





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/creative-fashion-designs-by-kansai-yamamoto-in-the-early-1970s/

Space Colony Art from the 1970s

In the 1970s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill, with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University, held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.

h/t: publicdomainreview









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/space-colony-art-from-the-1970s-2/

Beautiful Photos of Jane Birkin at Home Taken by Jean-Claude Deutsch in 1971

A native of London, Jane Birkin began her career as an actress, appearing in minor roles in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blowup (1966), and Kaleidoscope (1966). In 1968, she met Serge Gainsbourg while co-starring with him in Slogan, which marked the beginning of a years-long working and personal relationship.

h/t: vintag.es

After separating from Gainsbourg in 1980, Birkin continued to work as both an actress and a singer, appearing in various independent films and recording numerous solo albums. In 1991, she appeared in the miniseries Red Fox, and in the American drama film A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries, in 1998. In 2016, she starred in the Academy Award-nominated short film La femme et le TGV, which she said would be her final film role.

Birkin has lived mainly in France since the 1970s. In addition to her acting and musical credits, she lent her name to the Hermès Birkin handbag.

These beautiful photos were taken by photographer Jean-Claude Deutschthat that show beautiful portraits of Jane Birkin at home in Paris on December 15, 1971.

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/beautiful-photos-of-jane-birkin-at-home-taken-by-jean-claude-deutsch-in-1971/

A Gallery of Amazing Vintage Photos of Ferraris in the 1970s

For many true aficionados, 1970s Ferraris represent a golden age for arguably the world’s most famous car marque. In the seven decades since Enzo Ferrari founded his company, they have produced some jaw-droppingly spectacular cars, but there’s something special about the sleek lines and the raw, analogue power of 1970s Ferrari models, a decade packed with outstanding motors.

h/t: vintag.es

Building on this outstanding heritage, the 1970s Ferrari models pushed the boundaries further, ushering in a new age of technological innovation, design inspiration and hardcore power. It wasn’t a simple task to shine however, they needed to compete with the bedroom poster Lamborghini Countach, the James Bond-driven Lotus Esprit Turbo and BMWs first attempt at a supercar, the M1. And they did.

Ferrari’s 1970s models were excruciatingly cool and paved the way for today’s sensational speed machines.






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/a-gallery-of-amazing-vintage-photos-of-ferraris-in-the-1970s/

1977 Pontiac Phantom, the Last Car Designed by Bill Mitchell, One of the Automobile Industry’s Best Known Designers

The Pontiac Phantom (also called the General Motors Phantom and given the internal code name “Madame X”) is a concept car created by General Motors (GM) in 1977.

h/t: vintag.es

The Phantom was designed by Bill Mitchell and Bill Davis at Mitchell’s “Studio X”. Mitchell was an accomplished designer for GM who had designed the 1938 Cadillac Sixty Special, added tailfins to the 1948 Cadillacs, and designed both the 1963 and 1968 Chevrolet Corvettes. The Phantom was conceived by Mitchell as a retirement gift to himself and was also the last project for his Studio X, which had reopened to design the car. The lines of the Phantom are evocative of the late-1930s Cadillacs that Mitchell had designed earlier in his career.

The Phantom is a fastback two-seat coupe built on the chassis of a Pontiac Grand Prix. It only consists of a fiberglass shell and does not have a drivetrain, rendering it inoperable.

The car was considered a “personal expression” of Mitchell’s. He described the Phantom as “the kind of car I’d like to drive.” Mitchell elaborated that “with the energy crisis and other considerations, the glamour car would not be around for long. I wanted to leave a memory at General Motors of the kind of cars I love.” In the words of Jerry Hirshberg, who would later become head of design at Nissan, Mitchell “was fighting old battles and withdrawing increasingly from a world that was being redefined by consumerism, Naderism and an emerging consciousness of the environment.”

The Phantom project was initially supported by Pontiac, although they did not maintain support throughout development. Mitchell sent the car to the Milford Proving Grounds with the goal of impressing GM’s board of directors. However, when executive vice president of product planning and technical staffs Howard Kehrl saw the car, he ordered it to be removed from the proving grounds immediately.

After designing the Phantom, Mitchell retired in 1977, holding the position of director of the General Motors Styling Division at the time. The car is currently in the collection of the Sloan Museum in Flint, Michigan.


SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/1977-pontiac-phantom-the-last-car-designed-by-bill-mitchell-one-of-the-automobile-industrys-best-known-designers/