World’s Largest Vertical Garden Blooms With 85,000 Plants In The Heart Of Bogota

Behold: the largest vertical garden in the world. Located in Bogota, Colombia, the Santalaia building is completely covered with a lush layer of 85,000 plants that span 3,100 square meters (33,368 square feet). A vertical garden of this size can produce enough oxygen for more than 3,100 people every year, process 1,708 pounds of heavy metals, filter more than 2,000 tons of harmful gases and catch more than 881 pounds of dust.

More info: Paisajismo Urbano (h/t: inhabitat)

Paisajismo Urbano‘s Colombia-based franchise Groncol designed and installed the vertical garden using the innovative F+P system, patented by Ignacio Solano.






SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/Z5fyG2OniTY/

Danish Retailer Vipp Has Created A “Battery-Charging Stations For Humans”

Danish retailer Vipp has created a factory-made, metal-and-glass micro dwelling that comes filled with the company’s line of homeware products. Called Shelter, the 55-square-metre structure is intended to serve as a nature retreat and “battery-charging station for humans”, said Kasper Egelund, who heads the brand.

More info: Vipp (h/t: dezeen)

The Vipp cabin consists of a metal-and-glass rectangular box that is elevated off the ground by pilotis. Two chambers protrude from the roof – one of which contains a light chimney, while the other houses a compact sleeping loft.

Prefabricated just north of Copenhagen, each steel-framed cabin takes six months to produce and three to five days to install. The cost is €485,000 (£410,700), which does not include transportation.














SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/JJG-YXWZZo8/

Transparent Heart-Stopping Glass Sky Slide Starts Trial Runs In North China

A transparent slide located in the Dayudu Yellow River Scenic Area, northern China’s Shanxi Province, is definitely a daredevil’s game.

h/t: cgtn

The glass slide, which began trial operations on Friday, drops brave riders 100 meters over its 500-meter length.

The scenic spot also includes a 60-meter-long glass bottomed bridge and a 420-square-meter glass viewing platform, the largest in the province.

Praised as a “forest oxygen bar”, visitors standing on the high altitude structures can enjoy a bird’s eye view of the mesmerizing landscape.

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/A4QdsAzWKus/

Meet The Solar Egg, A Giant Golden Sauna Built In Luossabacken, Sweden

n response to a commission from Riksbyggen, Bigert & Bergström have created a sculptural chamber in the form of an egg-shaped sauna that has just been installed at Luossabacken in Kiruna, Sweden’s northernmost town.

More info: Bigert & Bergström

Kiruna is currently undergoing a radical transformation, which involves a gigantic move for the whole town. This is so that the mining company LKAB can extract more of the iron seam that cuts diagonally downwards beneath the town. The iron ore is and has been – ever since it first began to be extracted at the end of the 19th century – an important source of income for Sweden, and absolutely vital for the town of Kiruna. No mine, no town. But the breaking up and devastating transformation of the landscape, the environment and the architecture caused by the move are also sparking a lot of debate.

Solar Egg has been made as a social sculpture where local people and visitors to the town can meet and, for instance, discuss these challenges. In the arctic climate of Lapland the sauna occupies a key position, as a room for warmth and reflection. B&B have taken up this tradition and developed a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas. The project is a continuation of the artists strategy to incorporate the climate into the experience of the artwork which was initiated with the Climate Chambers in 1994.

The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development. The egg’s interior has been formed out of wood, with the wall panels and floor decking made out of pine and the bench of aspen. In the centre of the egg stand the wood-heated, heart-shaped sauna stove made out of iron and stone. The temperature inside the egg varies between 75° and 85° Celsius.










SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/a5ZdOcIrSh0/

Room With A Mountain View In Downtown Of Shanghai

A residential building in Shanghai’s Changning District has a distinctly different view in the concrete jungle. Those looking out the window will have the view of a 50-meter high mountain!

The artificial mountain was completed in 2003. Its design was based on Feng Shui, a Chinese philosophical system of harmonizing people with their surrounding environment. The design aimed to “moderate the ferocious location of the building”.

Upon seeing photos of the artificial landscape, some netizens argued that Feng Shui is pseudoscience, and that all the rooms will get is poor lighting.

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/OKT3MObkyKw/

Skyscraper Competition Proposal Involves Erecting Towers Within World’s Largest Trees

Called “Tribute: The Monument of Giant”, the visionary scheme imagines buildings constructed within the empty trunks of giant sequoias, a type of redwood tree native to the Sierra Nevada mountains in California. The structures would be placed where heartwood has rotted away, preventing the huge ancient trees from falling.

h/t: dezeen

Giant sequoias are the largest single trees in the world, with average heights of 50 to 85 metres and diameters of six to eight metres. They also are among the oldest living organisms on earth, with certain trees believed to be over 3,000 years old.

The concept – envisioned by designers Ko Jinhyeuk, Cheong Changwon, Cho Kyuhung and Choi Sunwoong – received honourable mention in the 2017 eVolo skyscraper competition.

“This project attempts to show a new architectural approach to human coexistence with nature, in harmony with the nature’s temporality,” the team said. “The architecture quietly takes place in the empty void of trunks, without hindering the breathtaking landscape formed by the giants. It then becomes active as an artificial organ to replace the trunks rotten away.”

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/75aDSbELIK0/

Futuristic Tangled Copper Pipes Run Throughout This Cinema

When ONE PLUS Partnership were designing the Shanghai Omnijoi International Cinema in China, they decided to pay homage to the movie industry. They did this by creating a copper track, similar to those used when filming a tracking shot, that runs throughout the lobby and even in some of the theaters.

More info: ONE PLUS Partnership (h/t: contemporist)

In some places, the copper colored metal tubes drop down to become seats for patrons to wait, and in others they become ticketing counters. Sections of the tubes also have straight light tubes to illuminate the mostly dark interior.


SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/2WyzjhSy66I/

This Jaw-Dropping 19th-Century German Bridge Uses Its Reflection To Form A Perfect Circle


Dirk Förster

Nestled among the verdant foliage in Kromlau, Germany’s Kromlauer Park, is a delicately arched devil’s bridge known as the Rakotzbrücke, which was specifically built to create a circle when it is reflected in the waters beneath it.

h/t: atlasobscura


Natalie Uomini

Commissioned in 1860 by the knight of the local town, the thin arch stretching over the waters of the Rakotzsee is roughly built out of varied local stone. Like many similarly precarious spans across Europe, the Rakotzbrücke is known as a “devil’s bridge,” due to the colloquialism that such bridges were so dangerous or miraculous that they must have been built by Satan. While the bridge (as with all the others) was created by mortal hands, its builders did seem to hold the aesthetics of the bridge in higher regard than its utility.


René Mettke


svolks


A.Landgraf


Henning Herrmann


Michael Bertulat

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/lPl4I7i1jrc/

This Building Uses Emoji Cast In Concrete As Modern Gargoyles

Emoji are going to be some of the most recognizable icons of the 21st century, says architect Changiz Tehrani, which is why he decided to cast 22 of them in concrete and use them as decoration for a building in the Dutch city of Amersfoort.

More info: Attika (h/t: theverge)

“In classical architecture they used heads of the king or whatever, and they put that on the façade,” Tehrani told The Verge. “So we were thinking, what can we use as an ornament so when you look at this building in 10 or 20 years you can say ‘hey this is from that year!’” The answer was obvious: emoji.




SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/9UOsFysQJzE/

This Chinese Farmer Built A Two-Storey Space Shuttle Replica On The Roof Of His House

This is the space shuttle replica that a 60-something Chinese farmer built on the roof of his home in the Guangdong province. Obviously, all the neighbors are jealous. And can you blame them? Who doesn’t want a spaceship replica on top of their house?

More info: Xinhua (h/t: geekologie, messynessychic, kotaku)

As you can see in these photos, the statue, which is covered in tiles, certainly makes the house stand out in a truly awesome way.

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/sP_GhPysQQs/