The Instagram Account Sharing The Most Beautiful Libraries In The World


Stadtbibliothek am Mailänderplatz, Stuttgart, Germany

As silent sentinels of the future overflowing with knowledge and information, monumental libraries pair culture and architecture with fascinating results. While the bookworm in all of us daydreams of visiting the endless volumes and sky high shelves of books throughout the world, there’s someone out there doing it: Thomas Guignard. After moving to Canada, the Swiss librarian and photographer has traveled to shoot some of the most beautiful libraries in the world.

More info: Instagram, Flickr (h/t: elledecor)


George Peabody Library, Baltimore MD


Radcliffe Science Library, Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford, England


Philologische Bibliothek, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany


American Room, Great Library of the Law Society of Upper Canada, Osgoode Hall, Toronto, Canada


Emmanuel College Library, University of Toronto, Canada


TU Delft Library, Netherlands


Stadtbibliothek am Mailänderplatz, Stuttgart, Germany


Jacob und Wilhelm Grimm Zentrum, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.


Toronto Reference Library, Canada


Rolex Learning Centre, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland


Rotunda chandelier, Los Angeles Public Library


Bibliothèque Schœlcher, Fort de France, Martinique, French West Indies.


Scott Library, York University, Toronto.


John P. Robarts library, University of Toronto.


Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, Canada

The post The Instagram Account Sharing The Most Beautiful Libraries In The World appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/03/the-instagram-account-sharing-the-most-beautiful-libraries-in-the-world/

Paris’ Utopian Village Of Concrete Cabbage

This hypnotic, vegetable utopia might look like it rolled out of a Stanley Kubrick film set, but it was in fact the dream project of French architect Gérard Grandval.

In the wake of WWII, architecture had been about building for many, and building fast, resulting in rather boxy structures. But Grandval had a grander vision, and championed an “organic design” philosophy when drafting plans for the city’s new social housing.

“The flower is my anti-cube,” he said about the site, “everything looked the same back then. Créteil was my chance to do something different.”

Grandval said he actually drew inspiration from Dahlias while drafting up the plans, but that locals “thought the buildings looked like cabbages or cauliflower, so the name stuck” A natural comparison, given that the region was a large producer of the staple French veggie.

It’s true that the utopia didn’t quite work out as planned. The upkeep for the structures was tedious, the apartments had little storage, and the balconies never became sprawling with plant life. In 2008, the government classified the site as a historic landmark. Today, the Créteil Cabbages are seen as a beloved, albeit awkward, testament to the groovy French idealism of the 1970s.

h/t: messynessychic












The post Paris’ Utopian Village Of Concrete Cabbage appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/02/paris-utopian-village-concrete-cabbage/

Bublik – Circular Apartment Building In Moscow Is The Pinnacle Of Brutalism

During the socialist time eastern Europe was a home to many unusual ‘brutalist’ structures, Moscow especially. Communist authorities had to industrialize and expand the cities as soon as possible because of large influx of rural population in capital cities.

Before WWII most of the population across eastern Europe were peasantry living in rural towns, however after the WWII the middle class was born and they had to live somewhere. The Soviet authorities started to build these massive buildings and one of them was the cylindrical apartment building which was constructed in 1972 by Soviet architect Eugene Stamo and engineer Aleksandr Markelov.

This building is located in the district of Ochakovo-Matveevskoe and it is nick-named “Bublic” among the local residents, because it just looks so much like a bagel (Bublik in Russian language). This massive building holds 913 apartments and as far as architects claims, five more similar buildings were supposed to be built before 1980 Summer Olympics.

Five buildings resembling the Olympic sign were intended to be constructed, but as they were too massive it would be hard to associate them with actual Olympic rings. Soviet housing was oriented strictly on practicality and affordability but it turned out these buildings were expensive to maintain so the whole project was abandoned and only two stand to this day.

h/t: slavforum







The post Bublik – Circular Apartment Building In Moscow Is The Pinnacle Of Brutalism appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/01/bublik-circular-apartment-building-moscow-pinnacle-brutalism/

The Tiny Tree House Sits Within A Forest In France

Atelier LAVIT have designed the ORIGIN Tree House for their clients in France who wanted to have a unique cabin.

ORIGIN is an exceptional cabin, a unique and tailor-made project. The architectural challenge for Atelier LAVIT was to create a functional and comfortable hotel room, being faithful to the first inspiration of the project: a bird-nest. The design of the cabin, coupled with the construction techniques, led to a rationalization of the assembly logic of the branches collected by the birds to create their impregnable shelters.

More info: LAVIT
















The post The Tiny Tree House Sits Within A Forest In France appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/01/tiny-tree-house-sits-within-forest-france/

The Desert House: A Landmark Of American Organic Architecture By Kendrick Bangs Kellogg


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive

Perched on the slope of a rocky hill in the Californian desert, not far from Joshua Tree National Park, the Desert House by American architect Kendrick Bangs Kellogg is hard to categorise. Its impressive exterior form which is impeccably composed and sophisticatedly embedded within its natural surroundings consists of numerous cast-concrete slabs, which seem to cover the interior like the foliage of an otherworldly tree.

Completed in the early 2000‘s after over a decade in the making, the house was commissioned by artist Bev Doolittle and her husband, who were fascinated by Kellogg’s unique aesthetic and gave him a carte blanche for the project.

Born in 1934, Kellogg is considered one of the pioneers of organic architecture in the USA; his idiosyncratic style has been expressed for the most part in private projects, examples being the striking Hoshino Wedding Chapel in Karuizawa, Japan, and the Yen House in La Jolla, California.

h/t: yatzer


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive


Lance Gerber / Nuvue Interactive

The post The Desert House: A Landmark Of American Organic Architecture By Kendrick Bangs Kellogg appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/12/desert-house-landmark-american-organic-architecture-kendrick-bangs-kellogg/

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, And Interactivity To Create “Living” Architecture

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

More info: Philip Beesley, Instagram, Flickr, Vimeo (h/t: colossal)





































The post Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, And Interactivity To Create “Living” Architecture appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/12/artist-philip-beesley-merges-chemistry-artificial-intelligence-interactivity-create-living-architecture/

The Finalists For The 2017 Art Of Building Photography Awards

If you have a good eye for a photograph and are passionate about the built environment then take part in this year’s Art of Building competition. It is free to enter and your photograph could inspire thousands of people. Previous winners have been featured on the BBC website, throughout the UK national press and in international titles across the globe.

The overall Art of Building winner is chosen by both experts and the public. It is a competition that celebrates buildings and the relationship people have with the built environment. Selected photographs feature in real public installations as the competition transforms construction hoarding into gallery spaces.


“Bicycle Rider” by Hans Wichmann; Avilés, Spain. “The photo shows the Oscar Niemeyer International Cultural Centre in Avilés, northern Spain. It is a successful integration of modern buildings in an old industrial site. A place for large and small people”. (Photo by Hans Wichmann/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)

More info: The Art Of Building


“Inception” by Hanqing Qu; Kuala Lumpur. “This picture was taken at Malaysia’s National Mosque. When the sunlight enters this building, light and shade meet each other in a dreamlike scene. It reminds me of the movie Inception”. (Photo by Hanqing Qu/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“The Showstopper” by Linda van Slobbe; Bar-du-Lac, France. “This historic theatre is built in a typical oval shape which has the stage at one end and multiple floors and balconies all around. This one has beautiful decorations”. (Photo by Linda van Slobbe/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Bones” by Francis Meslet; France. “This picture was taken in a well-known French memorial for the centenary of the first world war. You can see the other side of this memorial looking up over your head. Another point of view”. (Photo by Francis Meslet/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Eye of the Tower” by Mehmet Yasa; Verona, Italy. “The staircase and the bell looks like an eye. Architecture can fascinate us in many ways”. (Photo by Mehmet Yasa/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Geometric Concept” by Dmytro Levchuk; Dubai, UAE. “New architectural concept forms in a modern residential building. A sky-view through floors from the lobby”. (Photo by Dmytro Levchuk/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“From the Carpet to the Throne” by Hossein Younesi; Iran. “A special look at architecture, by defining the move to God-conceptual. The conception of architecture for man and his purpose”. (Photo by Hossein Younesi/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Cross Bridge Waltz” by Guo Ji Hua; Guangdong, China. “This work uses unmanned aerial vehicles. The intersection has an abstract line of beauty”. (Photo by Guo Ji Hua/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Cemetery of the 21st Century” by Petr Starov; Ryazan, Russia. “The image was shot in Russia in summer 2010. The photo reveals the suspended construction of a shopping centre”. (Photo by Petr Starov/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Manmade Cave” by Gautam Kamat Bambolkar; New York, USA. “Rugged textured cable pipes ran over my head at a train station in New York, creating a trance-like pattern. They ran from the edge of the entrance towards an infinite end. It looked like nothing less than a scary manmade cave”. (Photo by Gautam Kamat Bambolkar/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)


“Abandoned School in Fresno” by Robert Cassway; Montana, USA. “This photo shows the ravages of time and weather on a building that was left to decay after the families that lived in Fresno moved away. It is part a larger series of photographs titled The Vanishing West”. (Photo by Robert Cassway/Art of Building Photography Awards 2017)

The post The Finalists For The 2017 Art Of Building Photography Awards appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/12/finalists-2017-art-building-photography-awards/

Photos Of The New Colossal Futuristic Library In China With 1.2 Million Books


Ossip van Duivenbode

China recently opened a new futuristic library that contains a staggering 1.2 million books. If you enjoy architectural photography, Dutch photographer Ossip van Duivenbode‘s images of the library will be a feast for your eyes.

The new Tianjin Binhai Library in Tianjin, China, was designed by the Dutch architectural firm MVRDV to look like a giant eye.

More info: Ossip van Duivenbode, MVRDV (h/t: petapixel)


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode


Ossip van Duivenbode

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/photos-of-the-new-colossal-futuristic-library-in-china-with-1-2-million-books/

This Street Library In Bulgaria Encourages People To Read

“Rapana” is the first street library in Varna, Bulgaria created by a team of young architects and designers.

Nowadays young people’s lives are almost entirely based around the digital era and this decreases the popularity of books among this generation. A team of architects and designers (Yuzdzhan Turgaev, Boyan Simeonov, Ibrim Asanov and Mariya Aleksieva) decided to do what they can to partly solve this issue by building a street library.

Varna is a city located at the seaside and is often called “The marine capital of Bulgaria”. This is the main reason why the chosen concept shape of the library resembles the shell of a sea snail. The design was inspired by nature and its organic shapes. The installation takes into consideration the most important aspects of the city’s identity – the sea and its value to Varna’s citizens. The abstract construction unravels from a single focal point and develops into a semi-circle whilst creating a public space and shelves for placing books at the same time.

“Rapana” was designed using the parametric design tools Rhinoceros 3D and Grasshopper, which give architects the possibility to try different shapes and variations. Using the software, the team tested over 20 variations, changing the number of vertical and horizontal wooden pieces and their width and height. We ended up with the final design, fitting the budget and the open library’s concept, providing easy access for the readers, sitting spaces, plus a tiny stage for street artists and lounge sessions. Using the Rhinoceros 3D tools the construction was divided into pieces, which were produced using a CNC machine from a 250 x 125 cm. wooden sheets. The street library was built using 240 wooden pieces and the full capacity of the library is 1500 books.

More info: Facebook (h/t: boredpanda)







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/this-street-library-in-bulgaria-encourages-people-to-read/

The Family Dog Was Considered In The Design Of This Toronto House


Sarjoun Faour

When Studio AC were designing the renovation of a house in Toronto, they made sure to include a design element for the family dog.

As part of the design brief, the clients requested that a space for a dog bed be included in the design, and as a result, the designers created a small dog house that fits into the overall design. A central plywood box was designed as part of the renovation process that connects the kitchen, dining, living and entry, but it also has a small nook cut out for a little white dog house that pops against its plywood surroundings.

More info: Studio AC (h/t: contemporist, dezeen)


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/the-family-dog-was-considered-in-the-design-of-this-toronto-house/