The Family Dog Was Considered In The Design Of This Toronto House


Sarjoun Faour

When Studio AC were designing the renovation of a house in Toronto, they made sure to include a design element for the family dog.

As part of the design brief, the clients requested that a space for a dog bed be included in the design, and as a result, the designers created a small dog house that fits into the overall design. A central plywood box was designed as part of the renovation process that connects the kitchen, dining, living and entry, but it also has a small nook cut out for a little white dog house that pops against its plywood surroundings.

More info: Studio AC (h/t: contemporist, dezeen)


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour


Sarjoun Faour

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/the-family-dog-was-considered-in-the-design-of-this-toronto-house/

Reimagining The Simpsons’ Home In 8 Popular Architectural Styles

What better way to demonstrate America’s diverse architectural styles than through the country’s most infamous family — The Simpsons?

The Simpson family residence is instantly familiar to all, yet their dwelling could have been completely different if they’d embraced one of these popular housing styles.

More info: HomeAdvisor

Tudor

Tudor housing is perhaps one of the most recognizable architectural styles. Characterized by slanted timber beams decorating the front-facing portion of the roofing, this style often contains small groups of tall, narrow, and multi-paned windows for lots of natural light.

Colonial

American colonial architecture is a throwback to the period in U.S. history when settlers were colonizing the continent. This style, found in both urban and rural settings, is characterized by square floorplans, symmetry, and straight rows of windows on the first and second floors.

Log Cabin

The roomy, light-filled log homes we find today aren’t quite the log cabins of the 1800s. Traditional frontier-style log homes were rectangular, contained only one room, and had at least one glass window. They were built to be sturdy and inexpensive. More contemporary takes on this style often feature grand porches, numerous windows to let in natural light, and a larger footprint.

Victorian

Blending several styles that were popular in the second half of the 19th century, Victorian housing is certainly not subtle. It’s based on grand designs, often distributed over several stories. Common in the suburbs of New York and San Francisco, Victorian architecture features lots of brackets, spindles, and scrollwork and remains one of the most striking styles in the country.

Cape Cod

Cape Cod housing, which is associated with the New England region of the same name, is one of the most beloved styles in the country. Designed to cope with the frequently grisly weather conditions in the area, Cape Cod houses occupy a single-story and are dominated by moderately steep, durable roofs that can handle heavy snowfall. The rectangular footprint makes it relatively easy to expand to accommodate growing families.

Mediterranean

Designed with stucco walls and shallow, red-tiled roofing, Mediterranean architecture is a blend of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese building styles. These homes often boast prominent arches alongside details like heavy wooden doors and ornate carvings. Featuring large windows, verandas, and balconies, it’s the ideal dwelling for those in warm, southern climates.

Art Deco

Art deco signaled the beginning of modernity in architecture. Originally from France, the style features flat roofs, smooth stucco walls, and often bold exterior decorations like zigzags, swans, lilies, and sunrise motifs. The Chrysler Building in New York is one of the most famous examples of art deco architecture, but the style can also be found throughout Miami’s South Beach area.

Contemporary

Bringing much-needed warmth to the modern designs of the mid-20th century, contemporary homes emphasize spaciousness, sustainability, and regional character. You’ll often find simple, rustic materials, large windows and skylights, and perhaps even a living roof of green plants.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/reimagining-the-simpsons-home-in-8-popular-architectural-styles/

Japan’s Earthquake-Tesistant Dome Houses


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

Nestled near a volcano in southern Japan, 450 quake-resistant dome houses put up by a health resort and decorated with flowers and dinosaurs are drawing visitors from across Asia. A dozen polystyrene foam pieces, each so light that two adults can pick it up, are glued together to make the houses. Cabins modelled after Japanese sweets and made from polystyrene foam withstood last year’s deadly earthquakes in Kumamoto prefecture.

The head of Aso Farm Land resort, Katsuyuki Kitagawa, designed the dome-shaped cabins after being inspired by his work in the Japanese sweets industry, Konishi said. One day, Kitagawa thought it would be interesting to put people inside “manju” – traditional Japanese sweets that are round and filled with red bean paste – and decided to make rooms shaped like the confection.

Interior of a quake-resistant dome house decorated with Japan’s popular “Kumamon” bear character is pictured at the Aso Farm Land resort.

“These dome rooms were completely unharmed”, Konishi told Reuters. “Not a single pane of glass broke”. Wind and earthquakes do not easily damage the dome houses because they have no beams that can be broken, Konishi said.


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters


Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/japans-earthquake-tesistant-dome-houses/

This Instagram Account Dedicated To… Japanese Water Towers

The Instagram account Top of Water Tower proves that paying more attention to your surroundings leads to interesting visual sights. Dedicated to the tops of water towers in Japan, all colorful and graphic, this is an ongoing photographic collection by Osaka-based @watertoweruc.

More info: Instagram (h/t: fubiz)















































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/this-instagram-account-dedicated-to-japanese-water-towers/

Would You Feel Safe In A Building Like This?

British artist Alex Chinneck has completed his first permanent public installation – a 10-tonne ripped page made from 4,000 bricks.

The site of Assembly London – a campus of offices, retail units and restaurants situated in Hammersmith – is the canvas for this monumental work of art entitled ‘Six Pins and Half a Dozen Needles’. The installation is a tribute to the publisher that had called the area home for twenty years.

Chinneck explains: “I try to introduce sculptural interventions in unexpected contexts, heightening a sense of discovery when you encounter them. With this in mind, the archetypal nature of the building’s upper elevation makes it a perfect platform for surprise.”

More info: Alex Chinneck (h/t: dezeen)







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/would-you-feel-safe-in-a-building-like-this/

“Under”: Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant To Open In Norway

At the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline by the village of Båly, Snøhetta has designed Europe’s very first underwater restaurant. With its immediate proximity with the forces of nature, the restaurant, which will also function as a research center for marine life, is a tribute to the Norwegian coast and to Lindesnes – to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.

Under’s namesake holds a double meaning: In Norwegian, “under” can just as well be translated into “wonder.” Half-sunken into the sea, the building’s monolithic form breaks the water surface to lie against the craggy shoreline. More than an aquarium, the structure will become a part of its marine environment, coming to rest directly on the sea bed five meters below the water’s surface. With meter-thick concrete walls, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive acrylic windows offer a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.

Through its architecture, menu and mission of informing the public about the biodiversity of the sea, Under will provide an under-water experience inspiring a sense of awe and delight, activating all the senses – both physical and intellectual.

More info: Under, Snøhetta




SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/11/under-europes-first-underwater-restaurant-to-open-in-norway/

“El Orfelinato” is the second work of ongoing “Contextures”…











“El Orfelinato” is the second work of ongoing “Contextures” series by oddviz.

SOURCE: http://erdalinci.tumblr.com/post/166510705730

This Cozy Coffee Shop Was Inserted In An Apartment Block In Overpopulated Chinese City

Architecture firm FANAF, have designed the Pause Cafe that’s nestled within a 1980s apartment building in Nanjing, China.

The cafe is located in an area near Nanjing University, making the neighborhood popular both local and international students studying. After climbing some stairs up to the cafe, there’s a covered wood porch, while the cafe is defined by a black entrance.

The black and bamboo theme has been carried throughout the interior of the cafe, with a thick wood countertop and wood floors / seating. Matte black cabinets and shelving compliment the black chalkboard wall on the other side of the bar.

h/t: contemporist












SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/JAR4BhDJ7bU/

Inverted Solo House Pyramid By TNA Architects

This upside down concrete pyramid is one of 12 ‘Solo House’ projects located in Matarraña, a mountainous area in the eastern part of Spain.

That broader project is an attempt by French developer Christian Bourdais with the aim to populate the landscape with small resort-style dwellings. Tokyo-based architecture firm TNA, led by Makoto Takei and Chie Nabeshima, now proposed a plan based on Bourdais’ example.

The structures aesthetic is essentially an upside down concrete pyramid that has been partially sunken into the rural terrain. Large rectangular apertures provide bright rooms, flooded with daylight, while internal living spaces are organized around a series of mezzanines or platforms, set at different heights.

Due to the sloping topography, guests enter at the dwelling’s intermediate storey, an elevated platform that overlooks the dining area below. At the lower level, a large window offers wonderful views of the surrounding forest, while a passageway provides access to the kitchen. Three bedrooms are joined by a lounge at the larger uppermost story, connected to a centrally positioned swimming pool. Exterior renderings of the project show an earlier design concept, with a pool adjacent to the property also embedded into the landscape.

More info: TNA (h/t: ignant)




SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/ISA9rKn5PlE/

Delicate Patterns Adorn The Walls Of This Bright Nail Salon Interior

Architecture firm ARCHSTUDIO, have recently completed Lily Nails, a nail salon in Beijing, China, that features a dark hot-rolled steel plate exterior with glimpses of a bright white interior that has delicate patterns.

Stepping inside the salon and away from the noisy mall that it’s located in, white walls create a sense of calm allowing guests to relax and enjoy themselves.

More info: ARCHSTUDIO (h/t: contemporist)








SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/VOFxqrVoEN0/