UK Shed Of The Year Finalists

Sheds may seem like a humble garden storage solution, but impressive designs across the globe could certainly end this stereotype. This year, to mark the 10th anniversary of the Cuprinol Shed of the Year contest, planners have joined forces with a fan site called Cabin Porn to run a Global category in the contest – and the designs are certainly envy inducing.


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West Wing – owned by Kevin Herbert in Berkshire Made from 90% recycled materials and set across three sections, the West Wing includes a bed in loft space, an area to relax and escape, a secret bookcase, a play area, storage and workshop.

More info: Cabin Porn


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Old Garden Shed – owned by Brian in Hastings Upcycling pre-loved shed items, the Old Garden Shed is a nifty and obscure display set amongst a gorgeous garden and filled with workspace and vibrant 70s memorabilia


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Inside Brian’s Old Garden Shed lies an array of vibrant 70s decor.


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The Raisebury – owned by Peter Kavanagh in Berkshire Designed as a safe haven for valuable items in the case of flooding, this shed has the capacity to raise itself off the ground with steel sub-frame and four hydraulic legs that can be operated by remote control. Architecturally designed to make as minimal impact to the property as possible, it features mirror-faced glum to reflect its surroundings.


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Art Studio – owned by Peter Sedo in Worcestershire The quirky design consisting of recycled wood, a juxtaposition of curved and angled lines and various different shaped windows, this shed is spoilt with natural light. Set on a vast property, the shed is used for a work space, relaxation, entertaining.


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Rotating Shed – owned by Bryan Lewis Jones in Benbighshire As the name suggest, the stunning, open plan, curved architectural design rotates through 360 degrees to follow the sunlight throughout the day. Featuring inviting lounge chairs and a sumptuous fireplace, the shed is a great retreat.


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Maggie Ewing – owned by David Carter in the Scottish Highlands The shed is a renovated ex-boat wheelhouse originally called the Boy Peter which was one of the last boats ever to be commercially built in the county of Caithness. The boat is located right at the edge of the North Sea and faces directly out to sea.


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Love Shack – owned by Grant Oatley in Devon The Love Shack is a tiny little work of art that you could live in while also being completely transportable after being built on its own trailer. It’s clad with tiles made from reclaimed tractor inner tubes, and has a living roof.


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The Love Shack is a tiny little work of art that you could live in while also being completely transportable after being built on its own trailer.


Cuprinol/Rex Features/Shutterstock
Ilona’s Summerhouse – owned by Ilona in North Lincolnshire Hand crafted by a first-time builder with recycled materials of pallets, doors, polycarbonate roof and reclaimed paving slabs, this shed is a little sunlit hideaway.


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Austin Camper Shed – owned by Stephen Alleyne in Norfolk Built on a classic Austin J4 pickup truck, the Austin Camper Shed is fully equipped with cooker sink cupboards and bed. Designed as a house on wheels, this design is compact yet functional and quaint.


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Eryn, owned by Tom Chudleigh in Canada. New global research has revealed that ‘shed-scapism’ is sweeping the world with more people than ever ditching their tools and transforming their sheds into zen dens. The research comes as the Cuprinol Shed of the Year competition joins forces with aspirational shed fan site, Cabin p*rn, to launch the first ever global category. We have a stunning suite of imagery of 9 sheds from across the world – from Norway to Slovenia, British Colombia to Colorado who have all submitted their sheds in the hopes of being crowned the first ever Global Shed of the Year.

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/EcgAyAYnYrg/

A Giant Ancient Egyptian Statues Unearthed


Egyptian workers lift with an excavator parts of a statue for restoration after it was unearthed at Souq al-Khamis district, at al-Matareya area, Cairo, Egypt, 09 March 2017. According to the Ministry of Antiquities, a German-Egyptian archaeological mission found in parts two 19th dynasty royal statues in the vicinity of King Ramses II temple in ancient Heliopolis. The first is an 80cm tall bust of King Seti II carved in limestone, while the second is eight meters tall carved in quartzite. There were no engravings on the latter, however discovering it at the entrance of King Ramses II temple suggests that it could belong to him. (Photo by Khaled Elfiqi/EPA)


A boy rides his his bicycle past a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. Archeologists in Egypt have discovered a massive statue that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, one of the country’s most famous ancient rulers. The colossus, whose head was pulled from mud and groundwater by a bulldozer on Thursday, is around eight meters (yards) tall and was discovered by a German-Egyptian team. (Photo by Amr Nabil/AP Photo)


An Egyptian worker prepares to lift parts of a statue at the site of a new archeological discovery at Souq Al-Khamis district in Al-Matareya area, Cairo, Egypt on March 9 2017. According to the Ministry of Antiquities, two 19th dynasty royal statues were found in parts in the vicinity of King Ramses II temple in ancient Heliopolis (Oun) Sun Temples by a German-Egyptian archeological mission. (Photo by Xinhua News Agency/Rex Features/Shutterstock)


Egyptian workers excavate the statue, recently discovered by a team of German- Egyptian archeologists, in Cairo’ s Mattarya district on March 13, 2017. Statues of the kings and queens of the nineteenth dynasty (1295 – 1185 BC) were unearthed in the vicinity of the Temple of Ramses II in what was the old Pharonic city. (Photo by Khaled Desouki/AFP Photo)


Egyptian workers excavate the statue, recently discovered by a team of German- Egyptian archeologists, in Cairo’ s Mattarya district on March 13, 2017. (Photo by Khaled Desouki/AFP Photo)


Egyptian workers excavate the statue, recently discovered by a team of German- Egyptian archeologists, in Cairo’ s Mattarya district on March 13, 2017. (Photo by Khaled Desouki/AFP Photo)


Egyptian workers pose next to an excavated statue, recently discovered by a team of German- Egyptian archeologists, in Cairo’ s Mattarya district on March 13, 2017. (Photo by Khaled Desouki/AFP Photo)


A child poses for a picture past a recently discovered statue in a Cairo slum that may be of pharaoh Ramses II, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, March 10, 2017. (Photo by Amr Nabil/AP Photo)

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Building Of The Eiffel Tower In Stunning & Must-See Historical Photographs

The Eiffel Tower (French: La Tour Eiffel, nickname La dame de fer, the iron lady) is a puddle iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris. Built in 1889, it has become both a global icon of France and one of the most recognizable structures in the world. The tower is the tallest building in Paris and the most-visited paid monument in the world. Named for its designer, engineer Gustave Eiffel, the tower was built as the entrance arch to the 1889 World’s Fair. The tower stands 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building.

French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (1832–1923), designer of many notable bridges and viaducts and most famously, the Eiffel Tower in Paris, 1880:

Spencer Arnold/Getty Images

Stages of construction Eiffel Tower: 1887–1889:

Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images


Henry Guttmann/Getty Images

The elevator at the first level of the Eiffel Tower, during its construction. The elevator is still used for conveying sightseers:

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French engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (1832–1923), left, poses high on the steps of the completed Eiffel Tower, which he designed for the 1889 Paris Exposition:

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The Eiffel Tower built by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel for the Exposition Universelle or World Fair of 1889 in Paris:

Hulton Archive/Getty Images


Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The Eiffel Tower designed by Gustave Eiffel and erected in 1887–1889) in the Champs-de-Mars for the Paris exhibition of 1889. It was the tallest building in the world until 1930:

Fox Photos/Getty Images

Electrical workers balance high up on the Eiffel tower in paris to change the lights that illuminate the tower at night, 1937:

Horace Abrahams/Fox Photos/Getty Images

High above the River Seine two electricians work on the lights on the Eiffel Tower which will illuminate the Paris Exhibition at night, 1937:

Horace Abrahams/Getty Images

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/8VolIL0vjEg/

This Man Builds Gorgeous Custom House In 800 Year Old Cave

The days when humans lived in dark, damp and abandoned holes in Britain are, thankfully, long gone. But one former businessman has opted to return to underground living by building his dream home in a cave – in a bid to cure his Multiple Sclerosis.

h/t: dailymail

Angelo Mastropietro, 37, spent eight months single-handedly transforming the 800-year-old hobbit hole in the Wyre Forest in Worcestershire into a 21st century man cave, complete with running water, underfloor heating and even wi-fi.

The former recruitment boss was inspired to buy the cave after being diagnosed with MS at the age of 29, a catalyst which forced him to rethink his high-flying career and the stress and unhealthy lifestyle that came along with it.

“It’s in a beautiful location, it’s uplifting, it makes you feel good, it’s very relaxing. While you are a mile from the nearest pub or supermarket, you’re a thousand miles back in history.”


The father-of-two, who returned to Britain in 2010 after more than a decade living in Australia, first came across the cave in 1999 when he and some friends were forced to find shelter during a rainy bike ride.







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This Might Be The Coziest Bus Stop In Britain

Residents of Devon village of Walkhampton, England are close to what’s known as the “coziest bus shelter in Devon.”

The bus stop allows people to relax while they wait for their ride and it also happens to be the perfect place to read a book.



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Paper Models Of The Most Controversial Buildings Erected Behind The Iron Curtain

Zupagrafika, creators of make-your-own-paper-model sets of “brut-iful” architecture in London, Paris, Warsaw, and Katowice, have released their newest set, ‘Brutal East’. The creators’ selection captures the “certainly brutal” charm of the “functionalist panelák estates and otherworldly concrete grand designs” of the Eastern Bloc. With ‘Brutal East’ you can build your own East European city.

More info: Zupagrafika, Instagram, Facebook (h/t: archdaily)



















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The Magnificent Interior Of The George Peabody Library In Baltimore

The George Peabody Library, formerly the Library of the Peabody Institute of the City of Baltimore, dates from the founding of the Peabody Institute in 1857. In that year, George Peabody, a Massachusetts-born philanthropist, dedicated the Peabody Institute to the citizens of Baltimore in appreciation of their “kindness and hospitality.”

More info: The George Peabody Library

The Peabody Institute, according to George Peabody’s charter, originally comprised a free public library, a lecture series, a conservatory of music and an art collection. The Institute is now a division of The Johns Hopkins University.

The Peabody Library building, which opened in 1878, was designed by Baltimore architect Edmund G. Lind, in collaboration with the first provost, Dr. Nathaniel H. Morison. Renowned for its striking architectural interior, the Peabody Stack Room contains five tiers of ornamental cast-iron balconies, which rise dramatically to the skylight 61 feet above the floor. The ironwork was fabricated by the Bartlett-Robbins Company. The architecture of the Peabody Library is discussed in James D. Dilts and Catharine F. Black’s Baltimore’s Cast-Iron Buildings & Architectural Ironwork (1991).

The Peabody Library remained part of the Peabody Institute until 1966 when the library collection was transferred to the City of Baltimore and administered as a department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The collection was transferred again in 1982, this time to The Johns Hopkins University. The George Peabody Library is now a part of the Special Collections Department of the university’s Sheridan Libraries. Maintaining the provisions of Mr. Peabody’s original gift, the George Peabody Library is a non-circulating collection open to the general public.









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Chinese Province Spends $73M To Reproduce Century-Old ‘Ancient Town’

Construction on the Guiyang ancient town project in Hunan province began on Feb. 13, China News reported. The project was undertaken with an investment of 500 million RMB ($72.8 million). The cultural site, occupying 2,160 mu (144 hectares) of land, features pseudo-classic architecture including a Guiyang Confucius Temple, Kun Opera house, museums, ancient stages and commercial streets. It is intended to showcase the cultures of Guiyang over the last 2,000 years.

h/t: people.cn


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Living On The Edge Of The Icelandic Cliffside Retreat

Alex Hogrefe is a designer and founding member of the architecture visualization studio Design Distill where he specializes in fully visualizing the plans of architects through illustration. In his free time, however, Alex sketches up designs from scratch like this gorgeous Icelandic cliffside retreat.

More info: Alex Hogrefe (h/t: hiconsumption)

Set in the side of an ocean cliff and constructed out of what appears to be concrete, metal and glass – this modern structure looks like a spaceship that got stuck in a rock formation. The large open windows allow in natural light and offer up gorgeous views of the ocean to the occupants. While this rendering is expertly put together and totally imaginative, we can’t help but feel a bit of sadness knowing that this isn’t real.






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A Family In Belarus Lives In A Very Small And Tiny Awesome House

A family in Belarus finds themselves comfortable in this new mini house they built. The square space of the habitat is just 16 m2 or around 160 sq ft. They are a family with a kid so it is around 5 m2 per person, including a bathroom, a kitchen an living space.

h/t: englishrussia

The idea to move out to such a small house came to them when they found themselves giving a lot for their monthly rent. So they figured out they can instead build a micro house and save on rent.

They have to use the place to its maximum. They sleep above the living room and down under their kitchen they have a storage place.

They used isolation to be able to live here for the whole year round. They use natural gas and electicity for heating.

Inside house seems to be much more spacious than inside. They even have a shower.

They also live with a dog. And it finds itself ok inside with them too.

They built the house themselves. The total cost of the materials and all effort was just $4600. Together with furniture, household electrics etc. So the house paid off really quick as they paid more than $500 for a rent in Minsk.


It’s pretty much more spacious if to look from inside.



Here is the family all together.




Here is a house inside. Below kitchen on the left you can see a washing machine.
















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