Spectacular Winning Images of The Bird Photographer of the Year 2021

With over 22,000 images entered into the competition this year, Bird Photographer of the Year is pleased to present our winners. Celebrating bird life from around the world, these images comprise some of the most incredible bird photos in the world taken by talented photographers.


Best portrait, gold winner: Underwater Portrait, Felipe Foncueva, Spain. This image of a brown pelican was taken off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, near the mouth of the Tárcoles River. (Photo by Felipe Foncueva/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)

More: BirdPOTY


Best portrait, silver winner: Sing Heartily, Maofeng Shen, China. June marks the start of the breeding season for demoiselle cranes on the vast grasslands of Keshiketeng in Inner Mongolia. (Photo by Shen Maofeng/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Birds in the environment, gold winner and bird photographer of the year: Blocked, Alejandro Prieto, Mexico. The 2,000-mile US–Mexico border crosses some of the continent’s most biologically diverse regions. (Photo by Alejandro Prieto/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Birds in the environment, silver winner: Claiming the Forest Floor, Joshua Galicki, US. A male ovenbird singing on top of a fallen log. The bird is staking its claim to a breeding territory shortly after arriving from a lengthy migration to the north-east US from wintering grounds in Central America. (Photo by Joshua Galicki/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Attention to detail, gold winner: Disappearing, Rafael Armada, Spain. A penguin reflected in the water. (Photo by Rafael Armada/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Attention to detail, silver winner: Growing Up, Raymond Hennessy, US. Great northern divers (known as common loons in North America) and their chicks take to the water soon after the chicks hatch. The size difference between adult and youngster is evident in this image and shows just how much growing is left for this tiny chick. (Photo by Raymond Hennessy/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Birds in flight, gold winner: Thirsty, Tzahi Finkelstein, Israel. Common swifts live their lives on the wing and are a challenge to capture in flight. With a diet of flying insects, they need to drink from time to time, and they even do that on the wing. (Photo by Tzahi Finkelstein/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Birds in flight, silver winner: The Art of Motion, Nicolas Reusens, Spain. A hummingbird feeds from a flower. (Photo by Nicolas Reusens/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Bird behaviour, gold winner: Floral Bathtub, Mousam Ray, India. This image was taken at North Bengal Agricultural University in Cooch Behar, West Bengal. (Photo by Mousam Ray/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Bird behaviour, silver winner: The Face of Death, Massimiliano Apollo, Italy. In northern Italy in late summer, prior to migrating south, purple herons try to feed as much as possible and take advantage of the abundance of prey present in the rice fields. (Photo by Massimiliano Apollo/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Black and white, gold winner: Chinstrap Penguin, Renato Granieri, United Kingdom. A single chinstrap penguin on top of a giant iceberg. (Photo by Renato Granieri/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Black and white, silver winner: Feather Light, James Rogerson, United Kingdom. A preening northern gannet. (Photo by James Rogerson/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Urban birds, gold winner: Dipper On Shopping Trolley, Terry Whittaker, United Kingdom. A white-throated dipper nests under an old road bridge in Greater Manchester. (Photo by Terry Whittaker/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Urban birds, silver winner: Lockdown, William Steel, South Africa. A karoo prinia searching for insects on a security gate in South Africa. (Photo by William Steel/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Creative imagery, gold winner: Sprats and Bread, Ruediger Schulz, Germany. (Photo by Ruediger Schulz/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Creative imagery, silver winner: Funnel, Kathryn Cooper, United Kingdom. Between November and March, tens of thousands of common starlings migrate to Yorkshire Wildlife Trust’s Potteric Carr nature reserve. (Photo by Kathryn Cooper/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Portfolio award, winner: Puffins: Wing Stretch, Kevin Morgans, United Kingdom. (Photo by Kevin Morgans/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Portfolio award, winner: Puffins: Lost in Thought, Kevin Morgans, United Kingdom. (Photo by Kevin Morgans/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Conservation award, gold winner: Hargila Army: Beautiful Scavengers, Carla Rhodes, US. Towering at 1.5 metres tall and with a wingspan of 2.5 metres, greater adjutants are the most endangered species of stork on the planet. These birds were pictured in Assam in north-east India where they live on a landfill site. (Photo by Carla Rhodes/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


Conservation award, gold winner: Hargila Army: Beautiful Scavengers, Carla Rhodes, US. Workers sorting garbage at the Boragaon landfill in Guwahati in north-east India where the greater adjutant storks live. (Photo by Carla Rhodes/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


14–17 years, gold winner and young bird photographer of the year: Black Grouse Lekking at Sunrise, Levi Fitze, Switzerland. (Photo by Levi Fitze/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)


9–13 years, gold winner: In the Woodland, Andrés L Domínguez Blanco, Spain. This Eurasian nuthatch regularly uses the trunk of a Portuguese oak as a route to go down to drink. (Photo by Andres Dominguez Blanco/2021 Bird Photographer of the Year)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/spectacular-winning-images-of-the-bird-photographer-of-the-year-2021/

Spectacular Winning Photos Of Bird Photographer Of The Year 2021

‘Blocked’ by Alejandro Prieto. Overall Winner and Bird Photographer of the Year 2021

Here are the winners of Bird Photographer of the Year 2021. Photographers in this major international competition battled for the £5,000 grand prize, with the image of a roadrunner at the Mexico-USA border wall chosen as the Overall Winner.

With over 22,000 images entered into the competition this year, Bird Photographer of the Year is pleased to present our winners. Celebrating bird life from around the world, these images comprise some of the most incredible bird photos in the world taken by talented photographers.

More: Bird Photographer Of The Year, Instagram, Facebook h/t: 121clicks

‘Morning Lek’ by Levi Fitze. Young Bird Photographer of the Year 2021

Best Portfolio Winner by Kevin Morgans

‘Underwater Portrait’ by Felipe Foncueva (Gold)

‘Sing Heartily’ by Maofeng Shen (Silver)

Night Hunter by Jonas Classon (Bronze)

Birds in the Environment: ‘Claiming the Forest Floor’ by Joshua Galicki (Silver)

Birds in the Environment: ‘Yellow-billed Oxpecker with Cape Buffalo’ by Barbara Fleming (Bronze)

Attention to Detail: ‘Disappearing’ by Rafael Armada (Gold)

Attention to Detail: ‘Growing Up’ by Raymond Hennessy (Silver)

Attention to Detail: ‘Blue Flames’ by Kerry Wu (Bronze)

Bird Behaviour: ‘Floral Bathtub’ by Mousam Ray (Gold)

Bird Behaviour: ‘The Face of Death’ by Massimiliano Apollo (Silver)

Bird Behaviour: ‘Entangled’ by Julie Halliday (Bronze)

Birds in Flight: ‘Thirsty’ by Tzahi Finkelstein (Gold)

Birds in Flight: ‘The Art of Motion’ by Nicolas Reusens (Silver)

Birds in Flight: ‘First Come First Served’ by Hannes Lochner (Bronze)

Black and White: ‘Chinstrap Penguin’ by Renato Granieri (Gold)

Black and White: ‘Feather Light’ by James Rogerson (Silver)

Black and White: ‘Sur Les Roches Bretonnes’ by Nathalie Chanteau (Bronze)

Urban Birds: ‘Dipper on Shopping Trolley’ by Terry Whittaker (Gold)

Urban Birds: ‘Lockdown’ by William Steel (Silver)

Urban Birds: ‘The Guardians’ by Paolo Crocetta (Bronze)

Creative Imagery: ‘Sprats and Bread’ by Ruediger Schulz (Gold)

Creative Imagery: ‘Funnel’ by Kathryn Cooper (Silver)

Creative Imagery: ‘Cranes, Trains and Automobile’ by Ruth Hughes (Bronze)

Conservation Award: ‘Sentinels’ by Carla Rhodes, USA

9-13 years: ‘In the Woodland’ by Andrés L. Domínguez Blanco (Gold)

8 and under: ‘I See You’ by Deeksha Sambath (Gold)

Highly Commended: Aguti Antonio – AGGRESSION (Best Portrait)

Highly Commended: Brad James – MORNING BREATH (Best Portrait)

Highly Commended: Ben Cranke – THE BLIZZARD (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Ben Hall – BACKLIT BEAUTY (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Basileo Stanislao – WAITING FOR PREY (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Gábor Li – A PEEK INTO THE NIGHT (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Zakariya Omran – GOLDEN WAVES (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Gábor Li – LONELY DEPTH (Birds in the Environment)

Highly Commended: Li Ying Lou – LOVE CALL (Bird Behaviour)

Highly Commended: Brian Matthews – FEEDING TIME (Bird Behaviour)

Highly Commended: José-Elías Rodríguez – OVER A THISTLE FOREST (Birds in Flight)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/spectacular-winning-photos-of-bird-photographer-of-the-year-2021/

The 11 Winners Of The Prestigious 2021 Audubon Bird Photography Contest

Each year the National Audubon Society, an American non-profit organization dedicated to bird protection and environmental conservation, hosts the Audubon Photography Awards, and they have recently announced their winners and honorable mentions of 2021. This year’s Grand Prize winner is Caroline Fraser with her captivating and magical photo of the greater roadrunner captured in Texas. Though Caroline’s photo is truly amazing, other nominated photos were no worse, and Steven Jessmore’s picture of the northern cardinal was my personal favorite. Anyhow, check it out and enjoy! I’m certain you too will find a favorite or learn some interesting lore about bird species shown here.

Amateur Award Winner: Robin Ulery Species: Sandhill Crane. Location: Johns Lake, Winter Garden, Florida

Story Behind the Shot: For three years I’ve watched a pair of Sandhill Cranes that nest near my house, observing and photographing them from my kayak. On a blustery day this spring, I took my camera and paddled out to check on them. Two colts had finally hatched. The wind, though, made for a challenging photo shoot. There was no solid land to anchor to, and I bounced up and down, sometimes missing the birds completely. So I increased my shutter speed and ISO to compensate. Capturing this scene under those conditions felt like a once-in-a-lifetime moment.

Bird Lore: Sandhill Cranes have long childhoods. The youngsters—called “colts” for their long-legged, awkward look—learn to fly after about two months, but then stay with their parents for another seven or eight months, until the following spring. When cranes are very young, like the one in this portrait, they spend much of their time in physical contact with one of their parents, nestled under a wing or among the feathers of their back.

More: Audubon h/t: boredpanda

Professional Award Winner: Steve Jessmore Species: Northern Cardinal. Location: Rural Muskegon County, Michigan

Story Behind the Shot: On a bitterly cold winter day I went searching for eagles and Snowy Owls in rural Michigan. Cruising side roads, I noticed a Rough-legged Hawk perched atop a pine tree, but all I captured was its tail as it flew away. It was then that I spotted a male Northern Cardinal flying from plant to plant, feeding on the seeds, his red feathers reflected in the bright white snow flecked with ice crystals. I took the first shot when he took flight. By the second frame, the striking songbird was gone.

Bird Lore: Our familiar redbird is called “Northern” Cardinal to distinguish it from other cardinals in the tropics. Within our borders, it is most numerous toward the south. Seven U.S. states have chosen it as their official state bird, but curiously, none of those is in the Deep South. It may be that cardinals are most popular where people can enjoy the stunning sight of the brilliant red males against winter snow.

Grand Prize: Carolina Fraser Species: Greater Roadrunner. Location: Los Novios Ranch, Cotulla, Texas

Story Behind the Shot: One of my favorite places to take photographs is among the oil pumps and open space at Los Novios Ranch in South Texas, where wildlife weaves through cacti and birds perch on fence posts. On a blazing hot summer day just before sunset, I found myself lying facedown at an uncomfortable angle, my elbows digging into a gravel path as I photographed this roadrunner. I manually adjusted the white balance until I captured the bird bathed in golden sunlight as it took a dust bath.

Bird Lore: An icon of the southwest, the Greater Roadrunner is uniquely adapted for living on the ground in dry country. It can run considerable distances at 20 miles per hour and derive the moisture it needs from lizards, rodents, and other prey. When water is available, it drinks readily, but it seldom if ever uses water for bathing. Instead, frequent dust baths are the rule for roadrunners, along with sunbathing on cool mornings.

Amateur Honorable Mention: Tom Ingram Species: Peregrine Falcon. Location: La Jolla Cove, California

Story Behind the Shot: I had heard that a pair of Peregrine Falcons had built a nest near a cliffside hiking trail in La Jolla, so on a spring day I set off with the hopes of photographing them. As I walked, the raptors made screea calls and circled above. I stopped along the trail and watched a bird that had snatched an Acorn Woodpecker, commonly found in the palm trees nearby. The raptor landed on a ledge littered with feathers from past kills and began plucking the woodpecker, the feathers fluttering over the cliff’s edge as it prepared its meal.

Bird Lore: Masters of the air, Peregrine Falcons are capable of capturing or killing practically any bird, from rapid fliers like swifts to geese larger than themselves. Peregrines are most famous for spectacular dives from great heights, plunging at speeds up to 200 miles per hour to strike prey out of the air, but they have other hunting methods. These falcons are likely to take a bird like a woodpecker in a short, powerful burst of level flight.

Plants For Birds Honorable Mention: Karen Boyer Guyton Species: Anna’s Hummingbird. Location: Quilcene, Washington

Story Behind the Shot: Here in western Washington, Anna’s Hummingbirds are year-round residents. In spring females collect nesting material. Because I have some mobility issues, I do a great deal of my photography right outside my door. Getting the right lighting is always a bit tricky, and timing the hummingbirds’ visits to my patio is always a guess, so I’ve become very patient and observant. One of my favorite subjects is the Anna’s as they collect cattail fluff. I find this hummingbird shows a certain elegance as she gently tugs the seed fibers from the cattail.

Bird Lore: Hummingbird nests are amazing structures: tiny, strong but flexible, capable of stretching as the baby birds grow. To build them, females must seek out the most delicate materials in nature—like spider webs and plant down—to form the felted walls of the nest. As the heads of cattails begin to disintegrate to disperse their seeds to the wind, they make a perfect source for the kind of light fluff that the hummingbirds need.

Professional Honorable Mention: Steve Jessmore Species: Red-tailed Hawk. Location: Kensington Metropark, Milford Township, Michigan

Story Behind the Shot: I was hiking on a snowy, dark winter afternoon with a new camera and lens combination when a friend spotted a female Red-tailed Hawk. She flew out of sight, but we found her nearby jumping and grabbing leaves, trying to get her missed prey to reappear. When an eastern chipmunk ran from beneath the debris a few minutes later, the hawk quickly caught it and carried it to a tree. It was incredible to see that connection between predator and prey—one that I don’t usually get to share in a wildlife photo.

Bird Lore: The most widespread of the soaring hawks in North America, the Red-tail also has the most generalized diet: At any given place and time, it hunts whatever prey animals are most readily available. It may focus on squirrels or rats in city parks, snakes in high desert regions, or jackrabbits on sagebrush flats. Chipmunks are common prey in some places; even though they provide only a small meal, they’re relatively easy to capture.

Plants For Birds Award Winner: Shirley Donald Species: Red-winged Blackbird. Location: Blue Sea, Quebec, Canada

Story Behind the Shot: On an early July morning, I peeled the camouflage tarp off my canoe hidden in the marsh grasses along the edge of a small lake and stepped in, careful not to tip over. Paddling out amid the water lilies, I saw male Red-winged Blackbirds pluck dragonflies from the air to feed their nestlings. Females took a different tack: They hopped from lily pad to lily pad, plucking out insects inside the yellow and white flowers. I steadied my camera by setting it on my equipment bag, which was sitting on the floor, and shot away.

Bird Lore: In summer North American marshes come alive with Red-winged Blackbirds. Males are conspicuous as they sing and defend territories, while the more cryptically colored females do most of the actual work of raising young. This female, seeking food for her nestlings, employs a technique called “gaping.” Sticking her bill into the closed bloom of the water lily, she then opens her bill wide to spread the flower open, exposing insects hiding inside.

Female Bird Prize: Elizabeth Yicheng Shen Species: Northern Harrier. Location: Coyote Hills Regional Park, Fremont, California

Story Behind the Shot: I was waiting for Fernando the Chilean Flamingo to wake up from his afternoon nap. People have reported seeing the lone flamingo in the park since 2010, so I went out to photograph him. A commotion from the nearby water, where a Great Blue Heron stalked prey and a few gulls rested, attracted my attention. A Northern Harrier had come out of nowhere to hunt. I quickly adjusted my camera settings so I could get her owl-like face. This kind of unexpected encounter is why I always carry my camera when I venture into nature.

Bird Lore: Northern Harriers hunt by gliding low over open marshes and fields, watching and listening for prey. When the slender raptors detect a small mammal or bird, they abruptly turn, hover briefly, and then drop. Even an experienced adult may succeed in making the catch only about one-third of the time. Young harriers—like this juvenile, which is identifiable as a female by her brown eyes—may have a much lower success rate at first, but their skills improve with practice.

Fisher Prize: Patrick Coughlin Species: Anna’s Hummingbird. Location: Claremont Canyon Regional Preserve, Berkeley, California

Story Behind the Shot: For me, photographing feeding hummingbirds is a near-perfect combination of challenge and reward. In the spring, Anna’s, Allen’s, Rufous, Costa’s, and Calliope Hummingbirds—many of them adult males with glittering gorgets—sip nectar from purple pride of Madeira flowers in this preserve. When I looked through the photographs that I shot one spring day, this image of a relatively unassuming female, a juvenile Anna’s Hummingbird, immediately grabbed my attention. Though most of the bird is obscured by blooms, I caught that momentary flicker of eye contact through the petals.

Bird Lore: Hummingbirds are often described as preferring to feed at red tubular flowers. While many such flowers may have evolved specifically to be pollinated by hummingbirds, that does not mean the birds ignore other kinds. Anna’s Hummingbird, present year-round in most of its range, must adapt to whatever blooms are available. It quickly learns which flowers are providing nectar at a given time and will focus on those, regardless of color or shape.

Youth Award Winner: Arav Karighattam Species: Purple Sandpiper. Location: Rockport, Massachusetts

Story Behind the Shot: I was searching for eiders, scoters, and other diving ducks along the Atlantic coast on a cold February day. Suddenly a Purple Sandpiper flock landed right next to me. The birds fed, chatted, chirped, and chased each other, occasionally fluttering up when the waves washed over the shore. As the weather turned gustier, the sandpipers preened and settled down amid the rocks. I lay down flat, close to the water’s edge. I positioned my camera, resting it on a rock, and focused on one of the Arctic visitors, the purple in its feathers highlighted by the morning sun.

Bird Lore: No other members of the sandpiper family have such a northerly range, on a year-round basis, as Purple Sandpipers. These tough birds thrive in the harshest conditions. From their Arctic breeding grounds, they drift south in late fall to places where icy ocean waves crash violently onto coastal rocks. The sandpipers are perfectly at home in this turbulent scene, clambering about to seek tiny crustaceans and even sleeping peacefully among the boulders.

Youth Honorable Mention: Josiah Launstein Species: Canada Goose. Location: Burnaby Lake, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada

Story Behind the Shot: I was photographing Green-winged Teal when one extremely territorial Canada Goose charged another goose that attempted to land in the area. I positioned myself at the edge of the water and watched for signs of its next onslaught, taking a short sequence of pictures as the goose launched itself from the water to fend off the intruder. I was happy that some Green-winged Teal swam into the scene, their quiet feeding a marked contrast to the goose’s dramatic behavior. I guess the goose was determined to keep its corner of the wetlands all to itself.

Bird Lore: Canada Geese can be very aggressive, as many a person has discovered by getting too close to a nest. Their instinct to defend their territory is intense during the breeding season, when pairs actively drive away their own kind as well as other large intruders. Winter flocks are usually more peaceful. But as spring approaches, even a lone bird may shift into territorial mode and begin chasing away other geese.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/the-11-winners-of-the-prestigious-2021-audubon-bird-photography-contest/

Selection of Finalists for Bird Photographer of the Year 2021


Brian Matthews

These are a selection of the finalists of the prestigious Bird Photographer of the Year 2021 Photo Competition. With species from around the world, the shortlist offers a stunning look at birdlife across the planet. Highlights range from a face-off between a white-tailed sea eagle and fox in Japan, to a nuthatch landing in a garden in Solihull, UK.

Will Nicholls, director – Bird Photographer of the Year, explains: “This year we saw an incredible 22,000 entries into the competition, with images coming in from all over the world. The standard of photography was incredibly high, and the diversity in different species was great to see. Now the judges are going to have a tough time deciding the winner of the competition!”

Winners are announced 1st September 2021, and the next contest opens later that month.

More: Bird Photographer of the Year, Instagram h/t: petapixel


Daniel Zhang


Li Ying Lou


Øyvind Pedersen


Terry Whittaker


Daniela Anger


Gail Bisson


Tom Schandy


Mark Sisson


Diana Schmies


Scott Suriano


Irene Waring


Fahad Alenezi


Irma Szabo


Raymond Hennessy


Brad James


Amanda Cook


Andy Parkinson


Zdeněk Jakl


James Wilcox


David White


Aguti Antonio


Gábor Li


Mark Williams


Tzahi Finkelstein


Daphne Wong


Anupam Chakraborty


Taku Ono


Thomas Vijayan


Eirik Grønningsæter


Mario Suarez Porras

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/selection-of-finalists-for-bird-photographer-of-the-year-2021/

Beautiful Portraits Of Rare And Endangered Birds That Look Simply Stunning

The Himalayan Monal “The Himalayan Monal is the national bird of Nepal.” Photographer Tim Flach has three goldfish and two Burmese cats. The latter, Hunt and Blue, eagerly keep their owner company while he works, even though they would probably gladly devour some of his subjects. Flach is known for his striking portraits, where animals are treated with the same care as any human model.

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/11/beautiful-portraits-of-rare-and-endangered-birds-that-look-simply-stunning/

Beautiful Portraits Of Rare And Endangered Birds That Look Simply Stunning

The Himalayan Monal “The Himalayan Monal is the national bird of Nepal.” Photographer Tim Flach has three goldfish and two Burmese cats. The latter, Hunt and Blue, eagerly keep their owner company while he works, even though they would probably gladly devour some of his subjects. Flach is known for his striking portraits, where animals are treated with the same care as any human model.

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/11/beautiful-portraits-of-rare-and-endangered-birds-that-look-simply-stunning/

Photographer Turns Her Garden Into a Tiny Cafe; Shoots the Cutest Photos of Animal Visitors

It’s not an ordinary café as no human can get inside, sit down and order a drink. It was made by photographer Kristen Flagg in her own backyard, and its visitors are chipmunks, squirrels, and birds. Kristen doesn’t only serve them fruit, seeds, and nuts, but she also takes photos of her cute little customers. Kristen’s tiny café is located in Norwich, Connecticut. She named it Rosie’s Café because...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/09/photographer-turns-her-garden-into-a-tiny-cafe-shoots-the-cutest-photos-of-animal-visitors/

Very Rare Baby South Philippine Dwarf Kingfisher Photographed For The First Time Ever

We like to think that we’ve come a long way from the days of discovery when adventurers wandered into uncharted lands and came back with sketches and specimens of creatures never seen before. And while we definitely have, that doesn’t mean that we aren’t making new discoveries all the time or increasing our understanding of old discoveries once thought lost. More: Instagram h/t: diply...

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/08/very-rare-baby-south-philippine-dwarf-kingfisher-photographed-for-the-first-time-ever/

Very Rare Baby South Philippine Dwarf Kingfisher Photographed For The First Time Ever

We like to think that we’ve come a long way from the days of discovery when adventurers wandered into uncharted lands and came back with sketches and specimens of creatures never seen before. And while we definitely have, that doesn’t mean that we aren’t making new discoveries all the time or increasing our understanding of old discoveries once thought lost. More: Instagram h/t: diply...

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/08/very-rare-baby-south-philippine-dwarf-kingfisher-photographed-for-the-first-time-ever/

The Winners of The 2020 Bird Photographer of The Year Have Been Announced

The prestigious Bird Photographer of the Year (BPOTY) competition, now in its fifth year, has released the stunning winning photos for 2020. The contest is the work of Birds on the Brink, a charity aimed at supporting bird-related conservation projects around the world that awards small grants where they will do the most measurable good. This year’s winners were culled from more than 15...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/08/the-winners-of-the-2020-bird-photographer-of-the-year-have-been-announced/