“The Florist & Garden Miscellany”: Unique Collage Works That Include Botanics And Themes Of Mortality

Dan Barry has been drawn to creating mixed media and fond of collaged image drawings since he was a young person growing up in northern Wisconsin. Now living in Austin, Texas, his love of vintage visual media has grown and developed throughout his career.

More: Dan Barry, Instagram, Facebook h/t: boredpanda

In “The Florist & Garden Miscellany,” Dan continues to combine the marks of his hand with vintage mixed media, both old and new, to explore themes that are deeply personal in ways that make them universal. Dan Barry’s artwork reflects our difficult times in their exploration of loss, life, and mortality as well as our ongoing desire for deep human connection. His work invites us to reflect and embrace the place of love, loss, and the passage of time in our own lives.

“A lot has transpired this past year. In “The Florist & Garden Miscellany” (October 2 – 31 at La Luz Jesus Gallery, Los Angeles), I will be showing (60) pieces from my Botanical series alongside (11) related artworks that are larger in scale and/or more intricate.”

“In March of 2020, all of my upcoming exhibitions were canceled or indefinitely postponed within one week. That same week, I started “staying home” nearly full-time for the next 12+ months. I had no approaching deadlines and even more time on my hands to spend working in the studio. I began looking through my flat file drawers of paper and rediscovered a collection of hand-colored botanical prints that I had not thought about for a long time. The botanicals are from bound volumes of Paxton’s Magazine of Botany from the 1840s.”

“I set the stack on my work table and began to draw, collage, and build up a history of marks on them. It was a liberating way for me to get going once again in the studio. Over the following months, these meanderings resulted as a chronicle of my days, thoughts, and reactions to the world around me: widening national ideological divide, lies and conspiracy theories, racism and xenophobia, sickness, disease, death, aging and mortality, uncertainty, fear of a dystopian future.”

“As well as – a large amount of damage to my home and studio, caused by unprecedented, sustained winter weather in Texas and the failure of its vulnerable and neglected power grid.”

Below are some examples of the artist’s works in this series and other related works from “The Florist & Garden Miscellany.” You can find more at the website linked above.





















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/the-florist-garden-miscellany-unique-collage-works-that-include-botanics-and-themes-of-mortality/

Japanese Artist Azuma Makoto Will Make You Rethink Flowers

Artist and botanical sculptor Azuma Makoto doesn’t care if flowers die—he lights them on fire, drags them underwater, drops them out of airplanes, and launches them into space.

More: Instagram h/t: atmos

This is not to say that he has anything but utmost respect for his materials. The 43-year old pushes plants to the extreme—lighting them on fire, dragging them deep underwater, dropping them out of airplanes, and launching them into space—as a way of highlighting not only their beauty and grace but also their strength and resilience. With large swaths of the Amazon rainforest routinely on fire (home to an estimated 80,000 plant species) and the oceans steadily toxifying, that resilience is in fact already being tested.

Unlike the centuries-old Japanese tradition of ikebana, which prizes precision and negative space, Makoto’s floral arrangements are maximalist, sometimes literally explosive. In his Flower Man series, for example, towering arrangements fill a room; in a series of photographs, we watch people burst out from inside them. Makoto travels the world installing such joyful sculptures in public spaces and galleries, and his arrangements have unsurprisingly caught the eye of the fashion world.

































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/japanese-artist-azuma-makoto-will-make-you-rethink-flowers/

Rare Succulents Resemble Mermaid Tails, and It’s So Mesmerizing You’ll Want to Buy One


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Senecio vitalis (Narrow-Leaf Chalksticks) is a spreading evergreen succulent of great ornamental appeal with its cylindrical gray-green foliage. Its slender, slightly upcurved leaves, 3-5 in. long (7-12 cm), are glaucous-gray, finger-like.

They encircle the trailing stems and form handsome tufts at the stem tips. Erect at first, the stems become procumbent and often root at the nodes as they touch the ground. Small creamy-white flowers held in corymbs rise just above the foliage in late spring to early summer. Quickly forming a dense mat with its upward curving leaves, Senecio vitalis makes a great finely textured, medium height groundcover and provides extraordinary form and color contrast in the landscape.

More: Instagram h/t: brightside


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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/rare-succulents-resemble-mermaid-tails-and-its-so-mesmerizing-youll-want-to-buy-one/

Biodiversity Heritage Library Makes 150,000 Animal And Botanical Illustrations Available To Download For Free

The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a veritable storehouse of natural history documentation that provides open access to its digital library, which includes over 150,000 animal and botanical illustrations that can be downloaded for free. The mission of the BHL is to make its gathered documentation openly available to the public as a tool for biodiversity education. More:

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/02/biodiversity-heritage-library-makes-150000-animal-and-botanical-illustrations-available-to-download-for-free/

This 20 Foot-Wide Tapestry By The Fiber Artist Vanessa Barragão Recreates The World In Textural Yarn

In celebration of a partnership between London’s Heathrow Airport and Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, fiber artist Vanessa Barragão was commissioned to create a massive botanical tapestry. Using a range of techniques including latch hooking, felt needling, carving, crochet, Barragão mapped out and built up a textural surface that emulates a map of the world. More: Vanessa Barragão, Instagram h/t:

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/07/this-20-foot-wide-tapestry-by-the-fiber-artist-vanessa-barragao-recreates-the-world-in-textural-yarn/