A Gallery of Amazing Vintage Photos of Ferraris in the 1970s

For many true aficionados, 1970s Ferraris represent a golden age for arguably the world’s most famous car marque. In the seven decades since Enzo Ferrari founded his company, they have produced some jaw-droppingly spectacular cars, but there’s something special about the sleek lines and the raw, analogue power of 1970s Ferrari models, a decade packed with outstanding motors.

h/t: vintag.es

Building on this outstanding heritage, the 1970s Ferrari models pushed the boundaries further, ushering in a new age of technological innovation, design inspiration and hardcore power. It wasn’t a simple task to shine however, they needed to compete with the bedroom poster Lamborghini Countach, the James Bond-driven Lotus Esprit Turbo and BMWs first attempt at a supercar, the M1. And they did.

Ferrari’s 1970s models were excruciatingly cool and paved the way for today’s sensational speed machines.






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/a-gallery-of-amazing-vintage-photos-of-ferraris-in-the-1970s/

1977 Pontiac Phantom, the Last Car Designed by Bill Mitchell, One of the Automobile Industry’s Best Known Designers

The Pontiac Phantom (also called the General Motors Phantom and given the internal code name “Madame X”) is a concept car created by General Motors (GM) in 1977.

h/t: vintag.es

The Phantom was designed by Bill Mitchell and Bill Davis at Mitchell’s “Studio X”. Mitchell was an accomplished designer for GM who had designed the 1938 Cadillac Sixty Special, added tailfins to the 1948 Cadillacs, and designed both the 1963 and 1968 Chevrolet Corvettes. The Phantom was conceived by Mitchell as a retirement gift to himself and was also the last project for his Studio X, which had reopened to design the car. The lines of the Phantom are evocative of the late-1930s Cadillacs that Mitchell had designed earlier in his career.

The Phantom is a fastback two-seat coupe built on the chassis of a Pontiac Grand Prix. It only consists of a fiberglass shell and does not have a drivetrain, rendering it inoperable.

The car was considered a “personal expression” of Mitchell’s. He described the Phantom as “the kind of car I’d like to drive.” Mitchell elaborated that “with the energy crisis and other considerations, the glamour car would not be around for long. I wanted to leave a memory at General Motors of the kind of cars I love.” In the words of Jerry Hirshberg, who would later become head of design at Nissan, Mitchell “was fighting old battles and withdrawing increasingly from a world that was being redefined by consumerism, Naderism and an emerging consciousness of the environment.”

The Phantom project was initially supported by Pontiac, although they did not maintain support throughout development. Mitchell sent the car to the Milford Proving Grounds with the goal of impressing GM’s board of directors. However, when executive vice president of product planning and technical staffs Howard Kehrl saw the car, he ordered it to be removed from the proving grounds immediately.

After designing the Phantom, Mitchell retired in 1977, holding the position of director of the General Motors Styling Division at the time. The car is currently in the collection of the Sloan Museum in Flint, Michigan.


SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/1977-pontiac-phantom-the-last-car-designed-by-bill-mitchell-one-of-the-automobile-industrys-best-known-designers/

Beautiful Photos of Fiat X1/9, One of the First Truly Affordable Mid-Engine Sports Cars

The Bertone X1/9 is a two-seater sports car designed by Bertone and built by Fiat from 1972–1982 and subsequently by Gruppo Bertone from 1982–1989. Intended to be the first affordable mid-engined sports car, the X1/9 is notable for its sharp styling and impeccable handling.

h/t: vintag.es

The targa top can be stored in the front luggage compartment. It was originally designed as a sports car for the masses. The X1/9 came stock with a single overhead cam 1290cc engine that was mounted transversely ahead of the rear axle line and a four-speed transmission.

After 1978, it came with a 1489cc engine and a five-speed transmission. X1/9s have four wheel independent suspension with Macpherson struts. The brakes are disc, front and back. It has rack and pinion steering. No power brakes or power steering, and all the instrumentation is analog.

For the U.S. market, additional emission control equipment and large safety bumpers were added, which sapped performance.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/beautiful-photos-of-fiat-x1-9-one-of-the-first-truly-affordable-mid-engine-sports-cars/

1934 Peugeot 601 Eclipse, the First Automatic Retractable Hardtop for an Automobile

Fixed-roof cars of the early 20th century could feel claustrophobic. But convertibles of the time were often leaky, drafty, noisy, and insecure. The advanced solution came from Peugeot in 1934, with the introduction of the retractable hardtop on its luxurious 601. The self-storing roof structure automatically disappeared behind the passenger’s compartment into a space revealed by the reverse-opening rear deck in lieu of the trunk.

This Georges Paulin design set the general design standard for retractable hardtops. The technology surfaced in an American production car when Ford introduced the 1957–1959 Skyliner, and all modern variants can trace their roots back to prewar France and have evolved from Peugeot’s idea.

h/t: vintag.es

It used an electric to operate the roof mechanism which Peugeot promised would take 15 seconds to erect or lower, but it actually took closer to a minute to fully complete. Furthermore, four such cycles were sufficient to completely drain the car’s battery a situation which meant you had to do it by hand via a manual lever.

In 1935 the 601 was further developed with minor modifications and some new body variants on the C-series of 1934 and these were classified in the series 601D. The long body styles were called 601DL. The D-series are recognizable by the lowered headlights and the elongated handles on the hood instead of the flaps.

A total of 1,235 units were produced of the C variants in 1934 and approximately 779 units of the L. There were 1,074 copies of the D variants and 911 copies of the DL.

Although the 601 was only in production for 2 years, the 601 was a popular car at concours d’elegances. The body style “transformable electrique” (now known as the CC) in particular appealed to the public’s imagination.

The transformable electrique, or the Peugeot ‘Eclipse’, was born thanks to the meeting of three men: Darl’Mat, one of the most important Peugeot dealers, coachbuilder Marcel Pourtout and Georges Paulin, who was actually a dentist but also found his talent in designing of cars. It was Georges Paulin who entrusted the paper with an idea in 1933 to fold a metal roof completely into the trunk. He patented his invention and then went for coffee with Marcel Pourtout. Eventually, they enlisted their friend Darl’Mat to try out the concept on the new 601. The result was astonishing. The iconic Peugeot Eclipse was born.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/1934-peugeot-601-eclipse-the-first-automatic-retractable-hardtop-for-an-automobile/

Lamborghini Athon, an Amazing But Forgotten Concept Car From 1980

At the 58th Turin Motor Show, held in April 1980, Bertone introduced a new concept car based on a Lamborghini chassis – a slightly unusual choice, given that Lamborghini was in dire financial straits at the time. The press release from the Turin coachbuilder made it clear that Bertone wanted to support the company. The name Athon, referring to the Egyptian cult of the sun, was appropriate as the car was a spider, completely devoid of a top and intended as a fair-weather car.

h/t: vintag.es

The Athon was the first Bertone concept car created under the direction of Frenchman Marc Deschamps, following the departure of Marcello Gandini at the end of 1979. Some observers had expected Bertone to embrace a different school of design, but under the guidance of Nuccio Bertone, Deschamps seemed to follow closely in the footsteps of his predecessor. The Athon was thus based on similar aesthetic codes to the Bertone concept cars shown since the 1970s, with tense surfaces and highly sculpted geometric volumes delineated by clear edges and cut-lines. Likewise, the Athon explored themes close to Bertone’s heart in the treatment of glass surfaces as integrated parts of the bodywork or as openings.

Mechanically, the car was based on the Silhouette, itself closely derived from the Urraco. The three-litre V-8 gave 260 bhp at 7,500 rpm fed by four Weber carburettors and was mated to a five-speed manual gearbox. The wheelbase was unchanged, but the overall length was under four metres due mainly to the short rear overhang. With no soundproofing, driving the Athon at any speed was a glorious aural experience, as noted by Italian magazine Quattroruote in its July 1980 test review. Without any serious modification to the mechanicals, the car was reported to retain all the positive attributes of the Silhouette in terms of road-holding and handling.

The Athon’s proportions were unusual for a spider, with a forward-set cabin and a long and relatively tall rear deck underlining the mid-engine configuration. The engine cover was treated as a separate item, painted semi-matte to subtly offset it from the rest of the bodywork. Designed in such a way as to intentionally blur the boundary between the body and the mechanicals it contained, it even incorporated “dummy” air-filter boxes on its top surface. In contrast, the smooth wraparound windscreen made use of state-of-the-art glass technology and was smoked to integrate even more with the warm gunmetal grey body color.

It was a highly graphic but also a highly sculpted car: whilst the overall shape might appear somewhat monolithic – a sure sign of Deschamps’s intention – surfaces were deeply recessed on the flanks. The interaction of volumes between doors and side sills is especially dramatic. Taillights were but thin grooves recessed in the rear corners, so as to interfere as little as possible with the solid appearance of the rear end. The two-piece alloy wheels were manufactured by Campagnolo and were close enough to production form that they would be adopted on the new Jalpa a year later.

Although built in a short time span, the Athon shows the same quality of construction inherent in all Bertone prototypes, with a surprising level of attention paid to the interior detailing, both ergonomically and aesthetically. The innovative digital instrument display was developed with the Italian supplier Veglia, while secondary controls normally found on stalks – such as the windscreen wipers and indicators – were instead grouped in a pod a hand-width from the left of the steering wheel. These details, as well as the single-spoke steering wheel itself, were good examples of Bertone seeking to push the envelope with regard to interior ergonomics.



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/lamborghini-athon-an-amazing-but-forgotten-concept-car-from-1980/

A Photo Set of The 1960 Dodge Dart Phoenix D-500, a Reflection of The Jet-Age Styling of The Late 1950s

The 1960s opened with great promise. The Dodge Dart was a new model that year, based on a mid-sized 118-inch wheelbase unibody design adopted from Plymouth, and the Phoenix was the premium trim package for it. This special Phoenix was further equipped with the performance-oriented D500 package; indeed, this amazing motorcar features not only its original drivetrain and sheet-metal, but nearly every available option that could be added to this vehicle platform in 1960.

h/t: vintag.es

Dodge created 586 Phoenix D500-optioned Darts in 1960, but few were as spectacular as this one. The car is equipped with the 383/330 HP V-8 engine with Chrysler’s special long-tube D500 ram induction, which featured dual 4-barrel carburetors mounted on sonically tuned cast manifolds that looped across each opposing valve cover. It is backed by the pushbutton-activated TorqueFlite automatic transmission.

The car, featuring its Ghia-inspired finned-and-piped panels as executed by designer Virgil Exner, is painted red and augmented by front bumper guards, backup lights, door-edge moldings and dual side mirrors; lower-body stone shields and deluxe wheel covers complete the picture of Dodge luxury.

Inside are red interior components, complete with rare power-swivel front seats, power windows, factory electric clock, foam-cushioned rear seat and an Astrophonic AM Radio with rear-seat speaker. Driving ease was accomplished with power steering and power brakes.

Here is a photo set of the 1960 Dodge Dart Phoenix D-500, a reflection of the jet-age styling of the late 1950s and the cataclysms that brought about the legendary Chrysler products of the 1960s.







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/a-photo-set-of-the-1960-dodge-dart-phoenix-d-500-a-reflection-of-the-jet-age-styling-of-the-late-1950s/

Beautiful Photos of the 1953 Cadillac Le Mans

The Cadillac Le Mans was a concept car designed by Harley Earl and developed by Cadillac. It was named for the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France, in which Cadillac competed in 1950.

h/t: vintag.es

Displayed at the 1953 General Motors Motorama in New York City, the design was a low-profile (51 inches (1,300 mm) to the windshield frame), two-seat, fiberglass-bodied roadster. This concept showcased Cadillac’s first wrap-around windshield.

It was powered by a 250 hp (186 kW) version of Cadillac’s 331 cu in (5,420 cc) V8 engine, a power output not realized in production Cadillacs until 1955. The overall length of the Le Mans was 196 in (4,978 mm). Though four prototypes were built, the model never went into production.














SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/beautiful-photos-of-the-1953-cadillac-le-mans/

Beautiful Photos of the 1953 Cadillac Le Mans

The Cadillac Le Mans was a concept car designed by Harley Earl and developed by Cadillac. It was named for the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France, in which Cadillac competed in 1950.

h/t: vintag.es

Displayed at the 1953 General Motors Motorama in New York City, the design was a low-profile (51 inches (1,300 mm) to the windshield frame), two-seat, fiberglass-bodied roadster. This concept showcased Cadillac’s first wrap-around windshield.

It was powered by a 250 hp (186 kW) version of Cadillac’s 331 cu in (5,420 cc) V8 engine, a power output not realized in production Cadillacs until 1955. The overall length of the Le Mans was 196 in (4,978 mm). Though four prototypes were built, the model never went into production.














SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/beautiful-photos-of-the-1953-cadillac-le-mans/

Eccentric Vintage Car Ads From the 1960s and 1970s

In 20th century automobile print advertising, automakers often depicted their new models in settings that attracted the attention of potential customers and instilled a positive sentiment. Consequently, scenes from the beach, the mountains, the open road, a night out on the town, or even the driveway with the family simply admiring or washing their new pride-and-joy were a few of the popular concepts developed by the auto companies and their advertising agencies.

Many of the ads chosen for this article, however, show none of those inspiring notions. Rather, they generally took a more dramatic approach to elicit interest, with certain elements sometimes nearly overshadowing the vehicle they were attempting to sell. These types of ads were usually only a portion of a larger coordinated campaign, however, that also included a host of more conventional layouts. Nevertheless, they are intriguing.

Take a look the enclosed examples and see how many of them would have piqued your interest and motivated you to learn more about the car that was advertised.

1961 Pontiac Catalina

It’s a daring move to make the cropped photo of the cat that big and the line drawing of the 1961 Pontiac that small in this ad. Though I’d read that the Catalina was named for Santa Catalina Island (typically just called Catalina) off the California coast, and not for a feline, the comparisons are clever.

More: vintag.es

1962 Pontiac Parisienne

This pun-filled 1962 Pontiac Parisienne “recipe for zestful living” ad goes to 11—Pontiacs that is. Making the spice rack and jars so large relative to the car was a bold step, but no reader will forget the brand, as “Pontiac” is repeated on six of the eight bottles, and five more times below them.

1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray

Chevrolet did it again in 1963 with a giant dog riding shotgun in a Sting Ray. Is this supposed to be a “Made you look!” ad where the implausible attracts your eye? It made us look twice.

1964 Mercury

While many ads of the era portrayed picturesque barns in rolling pastures or as part of colorful autumn backgrounds etc., Mercury took a decidedly different direction with this 1964 ad that presents a barn on fire! Attention–grabbing? Yes. Disturbing? Also yes. Though its purpose was to highlight the adventurous-types that would be drawn to a Mercury, like volunteer firemen, still, very few car ads have shown tragedies, described here as “excitement,” in their backgrounds.

1964 Cadillac

The little girl on the swing looks like she is about to clear the roof of her parents’ 1964 Cadillac with plenty of room to spare. However, if my kid was reaching that height on a swing, I think the expression on my face would show quite a bit more concern than theirs does. (Maybe her image was superimposed onto the Cadillac photo?)

1967 Ford Mustang

It’s all hands and no car in this 1967 Mustang ad. The “Mustang Pledge” included a list of things that the owners promised to do and some they wouldn’t do. The big green hand, a veiled tie-in to the Jolly Green Giant of garden vegetables fame, seems strange today.

1970 Oldsmobile 4-4-2 W-30

The ever-popular Dr. Oldsmobile-themed ads were enjoyably offbeat already, but this one for the 1970 4-4-2 W-30 455 also includes “Elephant Engine Ernie.” Coincidentally, Ernie’s nickname—Elephant—was the same as that earned by the competing 426 Hemi that was optional in Dodges and Plymouths. Additionally, try reading the lettering on the front tire of the 4-4-2.

1970 Plymouth Road Runner

In the right places, for the right reasons. You’ll love it. Again. The loved bird.

1972 Mercury Monterey

For 1972, Mercury went for shock value again. A test to see whether or not a car explodes based on its ride smoothness certainly imparts a sense of danger, despite the fact that no potential buyers would seek out a luxury car to transport nitro carbol with a detonator attached. Additionally, no competing luxury cars were tested to see if they could accomplish the same task, so how do we know the Monterey is better than the competition in this area?

1976 Dodge Aspen R/T

Ski scenes were used in some ads of the era, but this one is “over-the-top.” Wayne Wong, “one of the world’s leading freestyle skiers” was willing to jump over his 1976 Aspen R/T for this ad. The result is a sports tie-in with a stunt component added to increase drama to great effect.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/eccentric-vintage-car-ads-from-the-1960s-and-1970s/

Amazing Photographs of Sir Malcolm Campbell With His Stunning Blue Bird Cars in the 1920s and 1930s

Sir Malcolm Campbell (March 11, 1885 – December 31, 1948) was a British racing motorist and motoring journalist. He gained the world speed record on land and on water at various times during the 1920s and 1930s using vehicles called Blue Bird, including a 1921 Grand Prix Sunbeam.

h/t: vintag.es

Campbell broke the land speed record for the first time in 1924 at 146.16 mph (235.22 km/h) at Pendine Sands near Carmarthen Bay in a 350HP V12 Sunbeam. He broke nine land speed records between 1924 and 1935, with three at Pendine Sands and five at Daytona Beach. His first two records were accomplished whilst driving a racing car built by Sunbeam.

On February 4, 1927, Campbell set the land speed record at Pendine Sands, covering the Flying Kilometre (in an average of two runs) at 174.883 mph (281.447 km/h) and the Flying Mile in 174.224 mph (280.386 km/h), in the Napier-Campbell Blue Bird.

He set his final land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah on September 3, 1935, and was the first person to drive an automobile over 300 mph, averaging 301.337 mph (484.955 km/h) in two passes.

Here, below are some amazing photographs of Sir Malcolm Campbell in different versions of the Blue Bird that he used over his career setting the land speed records:

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/amazing-photographs-of-sir-malcolm-campbell-with-his-stunning-blue-bird-cars-in-the-1920s-and-1930s/