Tokyo-Based Illustrator Shows The Everyday Olympics Of Ordinary People

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics are officially over, but the Olympic performances and feats never stop. How, you wonder? Well, people who live ordinary lives do them every day.

More: Instagram, Behance h/t: boredpanda

You might think that this is a little far-fetched, but this artist will prove to you that it’s exactly the case. Tokyo resident Adrian Hogan lived in the spirit of the Olympics just like all of Tokyo, and one day, he was struck by parallels that few would pick up on. He saw how ordinary people emulate the same athletic feats as the elite athletes.

So he decided to pick up his tablet and find more of these interesting parallels. Though the mundane life is less glorified, his illustrations elevate the everyday actions of Tokyo’s residents to the level of professional performance of the Olympians. And once you see it, you’ll come to appreciate the athleticism of our day-to-day routines.

Here’s how the artist got this brilliant idea: “I saw a shop clerk recently who threw open their store shutters and it reminded me of a weightlifter throwing their barbell into the air,” Hogan wrote on Instagram.

“I am an Australian from Melbourne. I work in Tokyo as a full-time freelance illustrator. I love living and working here. I like the way illustration is used in a lot of daily life in Japan (character designs everywhere, lots of illustrations used for public advertising, etc.) and wanted to be a part of it. I moved to Japan as I wanted an overseas experience. The more I have lived and worked in Japan, the more I wanted to create a life for myself here. My own country, Australia, is in the Asia-Pacific Region; I think it’s really important to get to know and understand our neighbors,” Adrian told Bored Panda.

“The polling (and my understanding from asking my friends and clients) was that the Olympics were unpopular with most people living in Japan. My intention with this Olympic Games series of drawings wasn’t to turn a blind eye to the reality of what was going on – but to acknowledge the difficulties while staying positive.” And in terms of his own experience there, Adrian attested that his “overall experience of living in Japan has been positive so far.”

In terms of achievements, Tokyo’s Olympics were a huge success for Japan. Japan’s athletes got 27 gold medals, twice as much as in the 2016 Rio Olympics, and nearly triple as much as in London’s 2012 Olympics. It seems that the home court advantage worked in their favor this time, and athletes were highly motivated to excel and make their country proud. All in all, they came in third in terms of gold medals, and fifth in terms of all medals. Congratulations Japan!

As we all know, Tokyo’s Olympics were also unique in other regards. Due to the raging global COVID-19 pandemic, the stadiums were bereft of crowds, athletes’ health was even more rigorously tested than ever before, and the whole event was delayed for a year. Though it’s not the first time the Olympics were delayed, the first time they were was in 1916, more than a hundred years ago, due to the First World War. During the Second World War, they were cancelled twice in 1940 and 1944. It goes to show how serious the pandemic is, though it’s not as serious as war, in which the Olympics are cancelled altogether.

But in spite of all of that, the current Olympics was quite a success, and didn’t have any serious incidents concerning COVID-19. Most assumed that the event would be a disaster, and yet it didn’t turn out to be as disastrous as most have expected. People feared that it could’ve been cancelled altogether, due to rising concerns about another wave of the pandemic. Some feared that the organizational strain would be too much to bear. But in the end, everything was just about right, and people focused more on the positive side of the Olympics, which is the athletic excellence and willpower of the world’s best sportspeople.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/tokyo-based-illustrator-shows-the-everyday-olympics-of-ordinary-people/

Stunning Winning Photos Of Wellcome Photography Prize 2021

Here are the winners of “Wellcome Photography Prize 2021”. Our two winners for 2021 are ‘Untangling’, Jameisha Prescod’s picture of herself knitting to block out her depression during lockdown, and ‘Trans Woman: Between Colour and Voice’, Yoppy Pieter’s series chronicling how the Covid-19 pandemic has made life harder for trans women in Indonesia.

The two winning entries were chosen by a diverse panel of judges from more than 10,000 images submitted from all over the world. Entries spanned six categories: Managing Mental Health series and single image, Fighting Infections series and single image, and Health in a Heating World series and single image.

The other category winners show volunteers disinfecting a theatre near the origin of the first Covid-19 outbreak, a man struggling to survive in the aftermath of a cyclone, a fantasy of depression as a sinister, ever-present fish, and a community whose fertile wetlands have turned to desert.

Managing Mental Health (single image): Untangling by Jameisha Prescod

“The isolation of lockdown exacerbated London film maker Jameisha Prescod’s depression, as she spent most of her time in the concentrated chaos of this room. “It’s where I work a full-time job, eat, sleep, catch up with friends and most importantly cry.” Before long, she felt like she was “drowning in the clutter”. For escape, she turned to knitting, which helps to soothe her mind. It may not be a cure, but it does at least put “everything else on pause” for a while.”

More: Wellcome Photography, Facebook h/t: 121clicks

Managing Mental Health (series): The Big Fish by Morteza Niknahad

“Inspired by a local Iranian myth, Morteza Niknahad reimagined his mother’s long-standing depression as a fish-like monster inside of her, a constant enemy to struggle against.”

Friendship Bench Zimbabwe by Brent Stirton

“Through Zimbabwe’s Friendship Bench programme, trained volunteers counsel people with depression and other problems using principles from cognitive behavioural therapy – in the informal setting of a chat on a bench.”

Birds of a Feather Flock Together by Rebekah Williams

“Spending time in nature can be beneficial for mental health, and Flock Together is a London-based birdwatching club for people of colour, building a community of mutual support.”

Morpheus by Agnese Carlotta Morganti

“ASMR artists create videos to induce soothing, tingly sensations (known as ‘autonomous sensory meridian response’) that can help to ease stress and insomnia. Watching or just listening has become a bedtime ritual for a growing online community around the world. Morpheus documents the work of four ASMR artists in Italy.”

ADHD Portraits by Nora Nord

“In the UK, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is ill-understood and under-diagnosed. The resultant lack of support makes life so much harder, causing mental health problems. To expand the conversation, Nora Nord photographs ADHD-diagnosed queer and trans people.”

Fighting Infections (single image): Fighting Pandemic by Sudipto Das

“It’s exhausting. A tram conductor in Kolkata, India, wears protective clothing from head to toe even in the heat of a summer afternoon. This was when restrictions were easing after India’s first Covid-19 lockdown – public transport was running, but staff were advised to suit up like this. We’ve all grown used to saluting the efforts of healthcare workers, but plenty of other people in public-facing jobs have performed gruelling duties too to keep people safe.”

Fighting Infections (series): Trans Woman: Between Colour and Voice by Yoppy Pieter

“Trans women in Indonesia face many obstacles in life: it’s hard to get a job, and to access healthcare and other government services. All of these difficulties have been made much harder by Covid-19.”

The Next Pandemic by Hugh Kinsella Cunningham

“Deadly new viruses can spread from animals to humans, and areas of rich biodiversity, like the forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, have been implicated in the emergence of viruses such as HIV and Ebola. Hugh Kinsella Cunningham investigated in collaboration with writer and public health professional Amelia Goldsmith.”

Metres: Masked Portraits on Ridley Road by Gideon Mendel (assisted by Maria Quigley)

“Portraits taken during the UK’s first lockdown on Ridley Road in Hackney, east London. It’s usually the site of a bustling market, but its hours were restricted and distancing lines were painted on the road.”

Measure and Middle by Ingmar Björn Nolting

“Covid-19 and lockdowns disrupted almost every aspect of life, challenging people, governments and organisations of every kind to find ways to adapt. Ingmar Björn Nolting travelled through Germany in April 2020 to see what was going on.”

Conflict and Covid-19 in Nagorno-Karabakh by Anastasia Taylor-Lind

“The war in Nagorno-Karabakh was the first conflict to start during the pandemic, and the overlap of the two crises was deadly. Infections spiralled out of control, caused by the pressure put on healthcare facilities and the mass movement of people in and out of this disputed territory (officially part of Azerbaijan, for years it has operated as a breakaway state backed by Armenia).”

Health in a Heating World (single image): Tears of Drought by Sharwar Apo

“Parents take their child to hospital in Rajshahi, Bangladesh, 10-15 miles across this drought-parched land, the mother holding a saline drip all the way. For much of the year, the land is dead like this, but for four months it’s flooded. Either way, safe drinking water is scarce, crops can’t grow, health problems abound – from dehydration to infection – and transport is limited. This family’s journey succeeded, and the child was treated for her diarrhoea. But many of those who attempt this journey are not so lucky.”

Health in a Heating World (series): An Elegy for the Death of Hamun by Hashem Shakeri

“For centuries, Sistan and Baluchestan has been a fertile region of Iran, with forests and productive cropland. But rapid climate change is turning it into a desert, bringing drought, hunger, unemployment and mass emigration.”

Until the Corn Grows Back by Lys Arango

“Increasingly erratic climate patterns have produced year after year of failed harvests in Guatemala, forcing thousands of people to migrate, trying to escape poverty and malnutrition.”

Diving Maldives by Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri

“As sea levels rise, the low-lying Maldives are predicted to be submerged by the end of the century. The government is working on solutions like barriers, and moving towards a net zero economy to promote sustainable living. To illustrate the future dangers, Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri projected tourist diving photos onto local scenes.”

Sun, Not Salt by Ayomitunde Adeleke

“There’s evidence that rising temperatures are increasing the risk of skin cancer – a particular danger to people with albinism. In Nigeria, the connection is not always well understood, and people often think the symptoms are caused by eating too much salt.”

Burnt Memory: Archaeology from a Climate Emergency by Gideon Mendel and Jonathan Pierredon

“The Carr fire in 2018 was one of California’s most devastating wildfires ever, spreading across dry land and accelerated by a tornado. It destroyed 359 square miles of land and forced 36,000 people to evacuate, and its smoke spread across five states. Eight people died. Rising temperatures and extreme weather events make fires like this an ever-greater threat to human life. Gideon Mendel worked with Jonathan Pierredon to create tintype photos of damaged objects found in the ruins of people’s homes.”

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/stunning-winning-photos-of-wellcome-photography-prize-2021/

Content Producer Lost Her Job During The Pandemic, So She Started Drawing

According to Kelley Hudson: “During the pandemic, I lost my job as a content producer and was unable to find work in that field for almost a year. Forced to relocate away from our home in Southern California to Spokane, Washington where my husband finally found work, I didn’t know what to do with a young child at home and a new town full of people we didn’t know (and really couldn’t get to know).

Depressed and broke, I went back to my art school roots and started drawing again to relieve some of the pressure I was under. I started posting my “doodles” to Instagram (@sequoiakelley) and, to my surprise, people actually liked them.

At a time when I felt absolutely useless and depressed about my career crumbling out from under me so easily; having people not only look at but LIKE my illustrations have helped me survive this pandemic.

Most ink and watercolor illustrations of things like my neighborhood and ways I felt during the year, here are some of my favorites that kept me afloat during Corona.”

More: Kelley Hudson, Instagram h/t: boredpanda




































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/content-producer-lost-her-job-during-the-pandemic-so-she-started-drawing/

Artist Drew Cats Working From Home During The Covid Pandemic Quarantine

Stages Of Waking Up

According to lemonblanc, an illustrator based in Singapore: “Self-quarantine can do things to your mind. At some point, I start behaving like my lemonkitties, or the other way round. I’m not entirely sure. Went out for a walk after the measures loosen up.”

More info: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Behance h/t: boredpanda

Going To The Moon

Every. Single. Morning.

Insisted To Have Their Own Call Instead

Hope You Feel Better At Home

Pj Mode

They Refused To Let Me Start My Call

Quarterly Financial Report

Fresh Air And Toilet Paper

Nice Mask

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/artist-drew-cats-working-from-home-during-the-covid-pandemic-quarantine/

Pop Stars Get ‘Vaccinated’ In Photo 9 Collages by Eisen Bernardo

Rihanna’s Loud

According to an artist: “This is to increase awareness and conversations regarding vaccination against Covid-19. I combined pop album/single covers with vaccination photos. The results are funny and tongue-in-cheek collages.

All vaccination pics from freepik.com.”

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda

Selena Gomez’s Rare

Lady Gaga’s Born This Way

Ariana Grande’s Sweetener

Lana Del Rey’s Blue Banisters

The Weeknd’s After Hours

Madonna’s True Blue

Sam Smith’s The Thrill Of It All

Taylor Swift’s Taylor Swift

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/pop-stars-get-vaccinated-in-photo-9-collages-by-eisen-bernardo/

Japanese Town Looks to Giant Squid Sculpture for Its Post-Pandemic Fortunes

When the Japanese government handed out millions of yen to local authorities to help revitalise the country’s post-pandemic economy it gave no stipulation as to how the money should be spent. A monumental sculpture of a goggle-eyed pink squid might not have been what was envisaged however.

h/t: artreview

The 25 million yen ($229,600) squid sculpture in Noto, in the Ishikawa Prefecture, pays homage to the fishing traditions of the coastal town. The thirteen-metre-long and four-metre-high sculpture was installed in March on a scrap of grass opposite a petrol station near the harbour.

Some locals have questioned whether the work was the best use of the funds however, asking whether the money might have been more urgently spent on support for medical workers or those whose health and income has been effected by the COVID-19 virus.


SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/japanese-town-looks-to-giant-squid-sculpture-for-its-post-pandemic-fortunes/

Blanc – World’s First HEPA Filter Powered Full-Face Modular Mask

We survived 2020, everything is permissible now. You do not have to wait anymore to dress however you want, wear a futuristic mask, live the cyberpunk dream! Before you know it everyone will be rocking their own cool mask.

Blanc is a cool face mask that shatters expectations of what a mask can do. You will be breathing fresh air through a HEPA filter, protecting your identity, and most importantly, having fun doing so with custom interchangeable panels.

More: Indiegogo, Instagram

This is a futuristic mask for those who set the next trend of alternative face masks, for those who are brave enough to stand out amongst the dull crowd. Blanc is not just a face mask. Its modular design allows you to customize your own Blanc to your style and break free from the mundane.

Blanc is more than just a cool face mask. Thanks to its comfortable air-tight fit, every breath you take is filtered through an SGS-tested replaceable HEPA filter. Blanc also offers exhalation filters as an optional feature to purify and clean not only your inhales, but also your exhales, keeping the environment clean for those around you.

HEPA filters, or high-efficiency particulate air filters, are a special form of mechanical air filters that force air through a multi-layered fine mesh of angled micro-fibers. This traps harmful particles such as pollen, pet dander, tobacco smoke, pollution and dust mites.

Blanc disrupts the new normal in fashion and safety, with a mask that not only protects your health but sets you apart from the crowd.

Express your creativity whether you are taking a walk in the park, sitting in front of your computer at the office, or enjoying your evening with friends at a club. Never settle for the ordinary. With its interchangeable magnetic panels, you can easily customize your Blanc’s front panel with different materials, textures, and colors to express yourself.









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/blanc-worlds-first-hepa-filter-powered-full-face-modular-mask/

Pandemics Past, Green Futures Merge in Ceramic Gas Mask Pot from Franco-Japanese Project

TENEO, a fashion brand embodying the finest elements of French and Japanese materials and production, has teamed up with master ceramicist Shibukusa Ryūzō, 7th generation of the Shibukusa Ryūzō Ceramics Factory operating since 1841 in Takayama City, Gifu Prefecture, on a bold new project.

More: TENEO, Instagram, Shibukusa Ryūzō, Yusuke Hamamoto h/t: grapee

The first phase of this project, which started with the main theme of “making traditional crafts into art pieces that can be used naturally in our daily lives,” was designed to realize a new form of traditional crafts in the midst of the drastically changing times brought about by COVID-19.

The gas mask, which is often associated with negative images such as anxiety and fear, was adopted as the design base as a symbol of pandemics past. By planting and arranging plants and fresh flowers, which have positive images such as reassurance and healing, as well as symbols of the future, TENEO hopes to convey the message of looking forward without forgetting the hardships and chaos of 2020.

Mr. Shibukusa, inheriting the traditions of the crafts-rich city of Takayama, has fully applied his finely-honed modeling skills to create two kinds of Gas Mask Pot:

One is a fully handmade model, in which he finishes the entire production process by his own hands, and the other is a semi-handmade model, in which he uses multiple molds and then finishes the details by hand. Both versions are available in bonsai pot and flower pot versions.

The main visuals feature bonsai by Yusuke Hamamoto, a young bonsai artist who is attracting worldwide attention for his traditional style.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/pandemics-past-green-futures-merge-in-ceramic-gas-mask-pot-from-franco-japanese-project/

Photographer Stijn Hoekstra Captures Empty Amsterdam During Curfew

Like many countries around the world, the Netherlands has introduced a curfew to slow down the spread of the virus and since January 23, between 9 p.m. and 4:30 a.m., Amsterdam looks like a ghost city.

When snow covered the capital in February, photographer Stijn Hoekstra went out to capture the unprecedented nocturnal atmosphere.

“The city once so vibrant felt eerie without anybody. I walked for hours during the cold night in which the city was covered with a beautiful white blanket. I knew, and hoped to never find the city like this ever again”, tells the artist.

More: Stijn Hoekstra, Instagram h/t: fubiz









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/photographer-stijn-hoekstra-captures-empty-amsterdam-during-curfew/

22 Cartoons That Show How COVID-19 Affected Our Lives

According to an artist Irina Blok: “It’s hard to believe it’s been a year since the official start of the Covid-19 pandemic. I could never imagine our lives would change in such dramatic ways. Since the beginning of lockdown, I’ve been drawing Covid Life cartoons to blow off some stress, and thought I’d just make a few and would run out of ideas, but the new ideas kept on coming and coming.

Just because everything changed so much, everyday things became surreal. For instance, since all doctor visits became virtual, I was joking the other day that “going” to a doctor would require showing different body parts on a video call, so I turned this conversation into a drawing.

As Zoom fatigue has set in and summer plans have been canceled, it’s hard not to feel tired at the end of each day. Drawing has helped lift my mood each evening, it’s been a great way to laugh and share some joy with others.

Hope you enjoy this fresh new batch! Previous posts here, here and here.”

More: Irina Blok, Instagram h/t: boredpanda





















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/22-cartoons-that-show-how-covid-19-affected-our-lives/