Japanese Food Artist Eiko Mori Makes These Cute Creative Toasts. Bon Appétit!

Here are the creative toasts of the Japanese Eiko Mori, a culinary designer who is having fun creating cute and appetizing toasts by combining natural ingredients and fruits but also typically Japanese ingredients.

More info: Instagram (h/t: ufunk)





























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/japanese-food-artist-eiko-mori-makes-these-cute-creative-toasts-bon-appetit/

JiyounKim Studio Launches Their Latest Design – The Lightning Lamp

Korean designer Jiyoun Kim has launched his latest design named the Lightning Lamp, at the London Design Fair.

The designer explains that his inspiration for the collection of table lamps comes from an old Korean phrase – “Being struck by a thunder out of blue sky” – which describes people confronting unexpected catastrophic events.

Once the designer decided on a design of a lightning bolt traveling from a cloud down to the ground (or base of the lamp), he worked with glass blowers to come up with the shape of the cloud.

The finished table lamp has a stainless steel neck of the lamp, or lightning bolt, that holds the glass cloud.

More info: Jiyoun Kim (h/t: contemporist)











SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2017/10/jiyounkim-studio-launches-their-latest-design-the-lightning-lamp/

French-Argentine Artist-Designer Pablo Reinoso’s Sculptures Manipulate Reality

Imagine snaking tree roots invading and taking over everyday items, pushing their way through obstacles to emerge triumphant. Nature appears to overcome inanimate objects and bring them to life, resuscitating them.

By distorting the familiar and manipulating our reality, the art of Pablo Reinoso succeeds in plunging us into a whimsical, fantastical alternate universe where things aren’t quite as they seem. By incorporating functional objects such as picture frames, chairs, benches, spades, ladders and garments in his artwork, though in mutated form, he has forced art and design to confront one another.

Artist or designer? Reinoso’s artistic oeuvre developed in parallel with his commercial practice. Starting to create innovative, playful furniture designs in the 1990s, he has since become renowned for his dramatic, stirring reinterpretations of ubiquitous and common objects. In 2000, he created a bench for the city of Fukuroi, Japan, on the outskirts of the soccer stadium that was the venue for the 2002 World Cup. His design work has the unusual ability of serving daily human necessity as well as awakening emotion. Sometimes one doesn’t know where the design stops and the art begins, as he integrates “function” into his artwork.

More info: Pablo Reinoso, Facebook (h/t: forbes)



































SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/Dcg-pCPuJO0/

TONITURE Lets Kids Build Their Own Fun Furniture Designs

Seoul design firm G280 Studio, have created TONITURE, a children’s furniture line designed to spark a child’s imagination.

Inspired by the children’s toy Meccano, the TONITURE (toy + furniture) kit comes with a variety of pieces that can be assembled to create furniture. The kit has large pieces that don’t require any tools, making it easy for children to build the designs themselves. If they get stuck while building, they can reference the guide which has a variety of ideas for them, like a giraffe.

Each of the pieces in TONITURE are made from high density fiberboard and steel, which can easily be assembled with knob bolts sized for little hands.

More info: G280 Studio, Wikipedia (h/t: contemporist)








SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/KvBtFsMIS1E/

“Storm Of Steel”: Stuning Design Of Body Armor In The First World War, 1914-1918

During the First World War, the size and scale of some of the weaponry produced devastating wounds and losses on soldiers. In order to provide some protection to the men in the front lines, armies explored the possibility of providing them with different types of armor.

Soldiers in the British army at the outbreak of the war were not provided with much in the way of protective clothing. The British military uniform for the time was made of hard-wearing brown khaki which did, at least, provide a measure of camouflage in the fields of France and Belgium but was not designed to provide any protection to the body of the wearer.

The British and French armies began to equip men with steel helmets in 1915 in a bid to protect the heads, one of the most vulnerable parts of the body in trench warfare, of their men from falling debris and glancing blows from bullets or shrapnel. Despite the utility of these helmets, they still left something to be desired. The German-designed Stahlhelm provided better protection to both the head and the shoulders of their soldiers. These helmets became so synonymous with the German army that allied nations proved reluctant to design similar headwear in case it led to confusion in the trenches.

h/t: vintag.es


A German member of a “Trench Attack Squad” poses in steel body armor and two stick grenades. The armor, capable of stopping a pistol round but only superficially helpful against rifle fire, also helped protecting against bayonet and other edged weapons thrusts. (Getty Images)


A soldier wear body armour made of linked steel plates covering his chest and abdomen, ca. 1914. (Getty Images)


A suit of heavy body armour used by the Americans in France, ca. 1917. (Getty Images)


American soldier trying on captured German body armor, 1918. (Getty Images)


A man models a steel helmet covered with a built-on chain screen to protect a soldier’s eyes from rocks, shells and other fragments during World War I. It was created by E J Codd Company of Baltimore, Maryland. (Getty Images)


October 1917: A present day soldier armed with a rifle shakes hands with a soldier in a full suit of armour armed with an axe. (Getty Images)


Georgian warriors of the Khevsur tribe wearing the traditional suit of armor. May/June 1918. (Getty Images)


Three Irish Guards wearing German body armor, examining a captured German machine gun, at Pilckem Ridge, July 31st 1917. (Getty Images)


Exhibiting pock marks and bullet holes, three members of the Ordnance Department demonstrate the effects of pistol, rifle and machine gun fire upon body armor, during testing at Fort de la Peigney, Langres, France. 1918. (Getty Images)


A series of German helmets displayed as a trophy in the U.S., 1918. (Getty Images)

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/GwSoT7N9Zho/

Artist Creates Dolls With Vitiligo For Kids With This Rare Skin Condition

Everyone wants to feel represented and looks like many artists nowadays are on a mission to make everyone feel included.

Kay Black, aka Kay Customz, creates unique custom-made dolls inspired by real people. Her newest, beautiful creations are amazing dolls with vitiligo. The artist paints the skin of her dolls with intricate patterns inspired by images of women and girls who have this condition and creates different styles fitting each doll.

“I love what I do and take pride in each custom design!” says the artist, and we believe she should as Kay’s creations make the world a better place.

More info: Instagram, Shop (h/t: boredpanda)










SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/Ung0xrm0rfo/

Artist Curtis Talwst Santiago Tansforms Antique Jewellery Boxes Into Tiny Dioramas

Nine years ago, Canadian-Trinidadian artist Curtis Talwst Santiago was given an old ring box by a Parisian street vendor, who told him: “I want to see what you make with this.”

Talwst placed a miniature figure emerging from a tiny seascape inside and, ever since, has been creating dioramas of scenes inspired by pop culture, current events and everyday experiences.

“I like to capture memories and fleeting moments,” he says. “They feel all the more moving because of their fugitive nature.” He hunts out the ring boxes in antique markets and on eBay, and is sent old ones by fans. “I want the viewer to open the box and feel they have been transported to another world.”

More info: Curtis Talwst Santiago


























SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/pH9JQpVZLNI/

Japanese Company Has Made Authentic Wall Lights Out Of… French Bread

A bread has some interesting charms. There’re potentials besides just as food. Pampshade is a handmade product made from real bread.

“It is made of real bread. I love bread, Bread are cute, I want to take a long look at it… These lampshade are created from such mind. The only one in the world, The lovely bread light you warmly. Bread flour, weak flour, solt, yeast, led, battery, and more…”, said the Pampshade designer Yukiko Morita.

More info: Pampshade (h/t: messynessychic)







SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/V_nO_wOYcjM/

Craftsman Jeffrey Michael Samudosky Transforms A Fallen Redwood Tree Into A Giant Eight-Tentacle Sea Creature

Washington-based woodcarver Jeffrey Michael Samudosky has been creating elaborate figural works from a variety of Pacific Northwest trees since he started his company JMS Wood Sculpture in 1998.

One of his most recent projects is a replica of an Enteroctopus dofleini, or Giant Pacific Octopus, carved from a fallen Redwood given to him by Redwood Burl. The cephalopod’s tentacles curve and twist their way across areas which Samudosky left natural, including the entire back of the trunk which gives the illusion that the octopus is on top of the tree, rather than a part of it.

More info: JMS Wood Sculpture, Facebook (h/t: colossal, laughingsquid)








SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/WGWsgYkQuXM/

These New Lagoona Tables By The Designer Alexandre Chapelin Look Like A Piece Of The Ocean

Alexandre Chapelin (previously featured) is the artist that has created the tables that provide you a dazzling blue by offering you a sample of the sea in levitation, in your home. And he lives in St. Martin. Unfortunately, the island of St. Martin was hit by the biggest hurricane ever recorded by scientists. Indeed, a category 7 hurricane with winds of more than 400 km/h.

Before the hurricane, Alexandre was about to create a new model ORO. ORO is going to be a table composed of two very big gold nuggets, and a considerable part of illusion of water in levitation. A fourth table in the NATURE series with an incredible natural stone.

And above all the CLUB DES 5. The CLUB DES 5 is a series of five tables all linked together by the same harmony and design. The ultimate goal is to sell these five pieces to five different people, and that an art collector makes the step to look for the five tables, and to become the owners of the latter. In order to re-create the CLUB DES 5.

Afterwards, there will be different clubs of the 5, this will be a collaboration with quatre artists from a different artistic world, such as street art, or four fashion designers to create five tables that will have the same goal we had evoked previously.

While waiting for him to put everything in place at his home in St. Martin, and rebuild his house. We invite you to discover the pieces that he has created for more than a year .

More info: Facebook, Instagram


































SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/cT_cgFjRIh0/