Designer 3D Prints Famous Logos Into Items You Can Use Everyday

Japanese designer Taku Omura has come up with an amusing project in which he 3D prints famous brand logos into everyday items you can use at home or office.

For example, Omura 3D-printed the Adidas logo and turned it into a pen stand. Louis Vuitton’s ‘LV’ monogram logo was turned into a card holder by elongating the ‘V’. The Air Jordan logo was turned into a clothes hanger, and it looks like a fantastic idea for their retail stores. In fact, most of the items showcased in the project would make great promotional products for their respective brands.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/08/designer-3d-prints-famous-logos-into-items-you-can-use-everyday/

Artist Maimouna Guerresi Photographs ‘Aisha In Wonderland’

The Italian-Senegalese artist Maïmouna Guerresi designs the colorful robes in her mystical portraits, fashioning each look from textiles she has collected while traveling through Africa and Asia. Her latest exhibition reimagines the story of Alice in Wonderland through the eyes of an African Muslim woman, Aisha, in a series of sculptures and photographs. Her work examines the human body and spirituality across cultures.

Aisha in Wonderland is an allegorical journey that centers around themes dear to Guerresi and links to the charm and the value of the mystic and veiled body’s diversity. It is the representation of the spiritually strong woman who, through her own identity, is able to dissolve the distinctions present between the masculine and feminine genres, leaving aside the stereotypes linked to Islam.

For over twenty years, Guerresi’s poetic work has been about empowering women, bringing together individuals and cultures in an appreciation for the shared humanity that transcends psychological, cultural, and political borders.

The exhibition developed around the concept of inner identity and communication, as the importance of freedom of expression, a narrative path, where video works, photographs and installations alternate. The different dimensions of the photographic works and their position in the exhibition space recall the proportions of Alice in the famous novel in which she becomes big or small depending on her meetings and experiences.

In this reinterpretation, Aisha does not appear as the protagonist of this visual narration, but as the gaze through which the observer manages to access an inner and hidden universe. Her new series deal with the theme of equilibrium through a metaphysical and surreal interpretative key, articulated by means of two different techniques: the sculptural installation and the photographic installation. The protagonists of the photographs walk or stop in unusual spaces, appropriating new physical and spiritual faculties.

These characters are a metaphor for the idea of identity, which in this work has been re-envisioned on the basis of spatial, cultural, and linguistic coordinates that transcend geographical boundaries.

h/t: marianeibrahim





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/08/artist-maimouna-guerresi-photographs-aisha-in-wonderland/

Awkward Vintage Japanese Movie Monsters

The kaiju eiga (literally “monster movie” in Japanese) was born in 1954 with Ishiro Honda’s landmark masterpiece Godzilla. Its immense international success spawned a chain of sequels, numerous imitators, more than a few rip-offs, and a slew of strange, bizarre cinematic creatures arising to threaten the existence of humankind.

And though many of these films have become regarded as camp classics — and some of them aimed to do just that — we must not overlook the frightening and downright creepy creatures that have appeared on Japanese theater screens over the last 63 years…




































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/08/awkward-vintage-japanese-movie-monsters/

British Artist Lucy Sparrow Makes An Art Installation Supermarket In Which Everything Is Made Of Felt


Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

British artist Lucy Sparrow makes her West Coast debut this week with a nearly 2,800-square-foot supermarket in which everything is made completely of the crafting fabric beloved by kindergarten teachers and camp counselors. The installation, which is staged inside the Standard, Downtown L.A. and runs August 1 to 31, is fully shoppable.

Browse 31,000 plush pieces, including jars of Vlassic Pickles, cans of Chef Boyardee, and boxes of Nerds and Red Hots, then make your way to checkout, where even the conveyor belt is cast in fuzzy fabric.

“From the fridges to the shelves – absolutely everything is made of felt”, says Sparrow.

In addition to groceries, Sparrow Mart will have a meat counter, a sushi bar (where shoppers can place individual pieces of sushi into a box and grab chopsticks, wasabi and soy sauce – all made of felt, of course), plus a 1980s video rental section with cloth copies of Short Circuit and Dirty Dancing, among other throwback titles. Though Sparrow did research in a number of modern-day American grocery stores, her L.A. installation is meant to channel a fictional supermarket in the 1980s.

“Sparrow Mart represents the first age of the hypermarket, where everything was available and plentiful and almost in hypercolor”, she says. As for whether or not Angelenos are ready for a full-fledged British felt invasion, Sparrow laughs. “This city has crazy stuff happen all the time,” she says. “If anyone’s ready for a felt supermarket, it’s definitely L.A.”.


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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters


Lucy Nicholson/Reuters


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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/08/british-artist-lucy-sparrow-makes-an-art-installation-supermarket-in-which-everything-is-made-of-felt/

Photos Show Chinese Factory Workers Making ‘Trump 2020’ Flags


Aly Song/Reuters

The president might like to tout his support for American workers, but those workers aren’t the only ones making flags for his Trump 2020 supporters. Photos released by Reuters on Wednesday show a Chinese factory making flags that suppliers will use to promote President Donald Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign.

The factory has produced approximately 90,000 “Keep America Great!” flags.

Fuck Trump!

h/t: huffpost


Aly Song/Reuters


Aly Song/Reuters


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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/photos-show-chinese-factory-workers-making-trump-2020-flags/

Traces Of Love And Personal Connections In Geometric Abstraction By Haris Lithos

Deep, striking colors and a delicate technique compose Haris Lithos‘ graceful traces on canvas, paper and wood. Working with models and occasionally objects and clothes, the artist stands mainly as an observer, a medium of his artistic practice, watching and guiding his subjects as they leave their body prints on the surface.

Lithos is an artist who pays a lot of attention to detail. His forms often repeat yet always differ from one another, highlighting each subject’s uniqueness. Whether it’s a female body or a teddy bear, each leaves behind a personal trace, a memento of its coexistence and collaboration with the artist.

More: Instagram h/t: art-sheep











































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/traces-of-love-and-personal-connections-in-geometric-abstraction-by-haris-lithos/

Artist Knits Dragon Scale Costumes

“Hello! We are scalemail knitters! We have traditionally knitting since 2004 and started knitting scalemail in December 2015. Currently, we focus on knitting scalemail using our very own developed stitching pattern. We were first inspired by CraftyMutt’s tutorials for how to weave in scales but then ventured off on our own to make our own style of stitch and products.”

More: Jaye Creations, Facebook, Youtube

































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/artist-knits-dragon-scale-costumes/

Leah Yellowbird Pattern Cardboard Animal Heads

Check out our deer, moose, and bear animal heads in the intriguing Native American art print.

The intricate patterns of these designs were created by Leah Yellowbird (leahyellowbird@gmail.com), a native American artist based in Minnesota. We’ve had the pleasure of providing Leah with the birch plywood base forms of our product for her to embellish with her detailed paint work. We then scanned her original patterns and printed them onto corrugated cardboard and birch plywood to make a more affordable product to share with a broad audience.

Intricate, graceful, thought-provoking and prolific — words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well-regarded for her work in all mediums.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and a prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious — they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

More: Leah Yellowbird, Cardboard Safari








SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/leah-yellowbird-pattern-cardboard-animal-heads/

Colorful Installations Of Spray Paint And Mesh Form Connections Between the Analog And Digital Worlds

Hanover and Berlin-based art duo Quintessenz recently completed a large-scale installation for the newly funded Paxos Contemporary Art Project, which is currently taking place on the island of Paxos in the Adriatic sea. Although designed to be appreciated and enjoyed in person, the images of their intervention created inside of a 400-year-old ruin are quickly becoming viral due to the work’s strong contrast against the historic setting.

The duo transform spaces into frameworks for presenting their abstract creations and challenging the spectator’s perception. These ideas are present in their recent installation Flickering Lights, which was was created for Fashion Week Berlin back in January 2018, and Pardis Perdus installed in Les Baux-de-Provence, France in 2017. In both of those installations, and their latest piece in Paxos, the artists use dyed or spray painted fabric in a range of layers as a way to interact with light conditions and points of view. The one-ton construction Flickering Lights was suspended in a large hall of Panorama Berlin from over 32,000 square feet of fabric and dyed with over 200 gallons of paint.

More: Quintessenz h/t: colossal










SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/colorful-installations-of-spray-paint-and-mesh-form-connections-between-the-analog-and-digital-worlds/

Lifelike Sculpted Figures And Immersive Monochrome Environments By Hans Op De Beeck

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck creates life-size figural sculptures and immersive environments from materials such as coated wood, polyester, and pigmented plaster. These chosen materials turn his constructed figures and installations into a uniform shade of matte gray, which makes the viewer feel as if the world around them has been zapped of color.

More: Hans Op de Beeck h/t: colossal











SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/lifelike-sculpted-figures-and-immersive-monochrome-environments-by-hans-op-de-beeck/