Stunning Black and White Photographs Captured the Spirit of Early 20th Century Athletics

My nanny Dudu, 40, on rue Cortambert in Paris, 1904.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Jacques Henri Lartigue was fascinated by the ascent of sport in the early 20th century as a fashionable pastime for the middle classes, and was himself a keen sportsman. Lartigue’s entirely unposed photographs, presented album-style in this gorgeous, luxurious and delightful volume, capture both the joyous exuberance of amateur sports––racing, skiing, tennis, gymnastics, hang gliding––and the particular character of its popularity in the first half of the 20th century.

h/t: vintag.es

Oléo, Rouzat, August 1908.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Lartigue is an absolute master at conveying the dynamism of the human body at play––the peculiar shapes it can contort into, and the gestures that can express anything from easy nonchalance to fierce focus. These photographs also serve as a historical catalogue of the paraphernalia and smart casual clothing associated with each sport.

The ZYX24 takes off while Piroux, Zissou, Georges, Louis, Dédé and Robert make there attempt as well in Rouzat, September 1910.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894–1986) was a French photographer and painter, most famous for his photographs of the leisure activities of France’s middle and upper classes. An avid photographer from the age of seven, Lartigue gained fame for his photo albums, which provide a comprehensive chronicle of the twentieth century in France and abroad, and for his official portraits.

Robert, the lightest, is chosen to test-fly the “Pic no. 3” in Rouzat, September 1910.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Dédé in Rouzat, 1911.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Zissou leans against the wind from Amerigo’s propeller in Buc, Nov. 9, 1911.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Grand Prix de L’Automobile Club de France, 1912.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

The great racer Nazzaro signals to Wagner to accelerate, Grand Prix de l’A.C.F., June 26, 1912.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Simone Roussel in Marly Forest, 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Simone and Golo in Marly Forest, March 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Charly, Rico and Sim in Rouzat, September 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Training of Suzanne Lenglen, Nice, November 1915.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Malvina in Chamonix, January 1918.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Bibi and Lolo in Paris, 1921.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Cannes, May 1927.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Cannes, May 1927.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Dawn in Hyères, September 1929.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Coco at l’Altana, the Weisswellers’ estate in Antibes, March 1936.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Deauville, June 1938.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

World ski-jumping championships in Juan-les-Pins, September 1938.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/stunning-black-and-white-photographs-captured-the-spirit-of-early-20th-century-athletics/

Paris in Vivid Color Images by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont, 1923

Paris as seen from the church of Saint Gervais.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

These colored photos by Jules Gervais-Courtellemont will take you back through time to see how Paris looked in 1923. The vivid images are produced using the autochrome technique in which the plates are covered in microscopic red, green and blue colored potato starch grains (about four million per square inch).

When the photograph is taken, light passes through these color filters to the photographic emulsion. The plate is processed to produce positive transparency. Light, passing through the colored starch grains, combines to recreate a full-color image of the original subject.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

A blind alley in old Paris.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Paris during the 1920s was an enigmatic and frivolous place. The people were changing, norms were being challenged and sexualities were becoming more present in the social spectrum.

The Jardin des Tuileries.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Stereotypically, the 20s were a place in history where people, especially the youth, began to break out of their societally-decided places and experiment with how they fit in with the world.

A flower market near the Chatelet.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Cars appeared on the roads; picture houses opened, projecting the world’s first silent movies; radios appeared in households; jazz flourished, and musical halls – where icons like Josephine Baker and Maurice Chevalier launched their careers – became the places to see and be seen in.

The Palais Garnier opera house.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Paris was at the heart of it all, not only in terms of fashion and entertainment but in the domains of decorative art and architecture, as movers and thinkers drew inspiration from cubism, modernism, and neoclassicism to create the ‘total’ style that came to be known as art deco.

Horses and workers on a riverbank.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Formal gardens and ponds.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The church of Saint-Étienne-du-Mont.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Paris in 1923.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Men on the Île de la Cité.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A view through trees across the Seine.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The gardens of the Senate building.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The hotel of Madame de Lamballe, a friend of Marie-Antoinette.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Moulin Rouge nightclub at Montmarte.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A colonnade and lake in a garden.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Moulin de la Galette, or Mill of the Cake, at Montmartre.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A view across the Seine.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The church of Saint Germaine l’Auxerrois.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The cathedral of Notre Dame.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The street of Saint Julian the Poor in old Paris.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A pathway in the gardens of a large estate.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Men stand beside crafts for sale near the cathedral of Notre Dame.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Grand Palais des Champs-Élysées.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Trocadero gardens and the Eiffel Tower.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A view down the street to the Panthéon.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

A street scene outside a butcher’s shop.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Museum of the Decorative Arts in the Tuileries.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The flower market on the Quai aux Flaers.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

The Porte Saint-Denis.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

Twilight on the Seine.

Jules Gervais-Courtellemont/National Geographic Creative/Corbis

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/paris-in-vivid-color-images-by-jules-gervais-courtellemont-1923/

This Optical Illusion Is the Most Beautiful Street Artwork in France


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An impressive trompe-l-oeil fresco painted in the coastal city of Boulogne-Sur-Mer was recently crowned France’s most beautiful street artwork for 2020.

Every year, a popular French portal dedicated to urban art hosts a national competition to crown the nation’s most impressive street art. Thousands of votes are cast, and for last year, the title went to an amazing artwork created by Spanish street artist Gonzalo Borondo, on the city’s rue Jules Baudelocque, last summer. From the right angle, it looks like an elaborate metal gate, with detailed bas-reliefs on either side, but a closer look reveals it to be just an optical illusion.

Gonzalo Borondo is an accomplished street artist, whose works adorn buildings and streets all over the world, but this win is definitely a nice feather for his cap.

More: Gonzalo Borondo, Facebook, Youtube h/t: odditycentral


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Located on this grand staircase on rue Jules-Baudelocque in a traditional district of Boulogne-sur-mer, Borondo’s fresco is meant to be an allegory of life, according to Abid Amziane, the head of the city’s street-art festival.


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“You first see a closed door, and you may think that in life everything is closed. But by going up on each step, you reach stages, like consciousness, or free will. And at the seventh and last level, you understand that life has just started, and that you should never let go,” Amziane said.

Interestingly Gonzalo Borondo’s street artwork is unfinished. Because of the rain, the Spanish artist could only work his magic for four days, instead of the planned seven, so he is expected back this year to finish the masterpiece. If it already looks good enough to win the prestigious Golden Street Art prize, I wonder how it’ll look when it’s done.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/this-optical-illusion-is-the-most-beautiful-street-artwork-in-france/

When Paris Was Protected with Sandbags and Masking Tape, 1914-1918

Arc de Triomphe.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

By the first week of September 1914, the Germans had come within thirty kilometers of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris. The French and British armies were engaged in fierce fighting with the Germans in the First Battle of the Marne which repelled the Germans. Still, Parish remained uncomfortably close to the front lines for much of the Great War.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Masking tapes on glass windows (protection against explosions).

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Once the war started, much of the city’s bustling life abruptly halted as men mobilized and shipped off to the frontlines. In their place, wives, daughters, sisters, and mothers filled the labor gap. Many shops closed, though those selling food and other daily provisions remained open. Several of Paris’ big hotels, devoid of guests and much of their staff, transformed into hospitals.

Notre Dame de Paris.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

It was during this time that sandbags began to enter largely into the scenery of Paris. To protect its famous monuments from bombardment and shrapnel, the city’s population set up piles of sandbags, stored the important artwork in a safe location, removed the stained-glass windows from cathedrals and other buildings.

Fontaine Carpeaux.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Another creative protection method was reinforcing windows with lattices of masking tape which was never tested whether it really worked against the blast. Nevertheless, it offered some sort of psychological protection against the gloomy wartime backdrop.

Stores using mask tapes.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Colonne Vendôme.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Le Louvre.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Another view of Notre Dame de Paris.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Sandbags protecting the Amiens Cathedral.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/when-paris-was-protected-with-sandbags-and-masking-tape-1914-1918/

How To Recognise Clouds – The International Cloud Atlas, 1896

The Atlas international des Nuages (International Cloud Atlas; Internationaler Wolkenatlas) was published in Paris, France, by Gauthier-Villars et fils in 1896. This pictorial atlas contained 14 illustrations on 14 printed color plates. A mix of photographs (chromotypographs) and pantings, the text was in English, French, and German.

h/t: flashbak

The Atlas broke new ground, introducing a universal language of cloud identification, and embraced emerging technologies – the page on cirrus clouds was the first type of cloud illustrated from a color photograph.

Just as British chemist Luke Howard (28 November 1772 – 21 March 1864) had done when he named clouds, classifying them into 7 types, the International Cloud Atlas was a huge step in increasing our understanding of the skies.

Cloud research is ongoing. In 2019, World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas reaffirmed the importance of understanding clouds: “If we want to forecast weather we have to understand clouds. If we want to model the climate system we have to understand clouds. And if we want to predict the availability of water resources, we have to understand clouds.”

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/how-to-recognise-clouds-the-international-cloud-atlas-1896/

Artist Replaces Famous Parisian Monuments with Iconic Pop Culture Characters

French artist Benoit Lapray worked in collaboration with studio 95 Magenta and Emmanuelle Vonck Lugand to create this fantastic project that replaces famous Parisian monuments with iconic pop culture characters.

More: Benoit Lapray, Instagram, Facebook h/t: theinspirationgrid























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/artist-replaces-famous-parisian-monuments-with-iconic-pop-culture-characters/

“Poetic Dance in Nature”: The Pastel and Romantic Universe of The Photographer Alexandre Delamadeleine

Alexandre Delamadeleine is a French photographer who captures nature. His gallery is filled with delicate images reflecting everyday moments and travel memories.

More: Alexandre Delamadeleine, Instagram




































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/poetic-dance-in-nature-the-pastel-and-romantic-universe-of-the-photographer-alexandre-delamadeleine/

Gorgeous Portrait Photos of Carla Bruni as a Fashion Model in the 1980s and ’90s

Born 1967 in Turin, Italy and moved to France at the age of seven, Carla Bruni was a model from 1987 to 1997 before taking up a career in music. She wrote several songs for Julien Clerc that were featured on his 2000 album, Si j’étais elle. h/t: vintag.es Bruni released her first album, Quelqu’un m’a dit, in 2002, which eventually spent thirty-four weeks in the top 10 of the French Albums Chart.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/gorgeous-portrait-photos-of-carla-bruni-as-a-fashion-model-in-the-1980s-and-90s/

Photographer Paolo Pettigiani Captures Stunning Infrared Landscapes of French Alps

Italian photographer and artistic director Paolo Pettigiani, based in Turin, has just unveiled a new part of his “Infraland” project. In his series “Infraland Valley”, the artist used a drone to take aerial images of the Ailefroide valley, in the French Alps, using infrared photography. By bringing out elements with chlorophyll like trees and grass, this technique enables the artist to modify our...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/photographer-paolo-pettigiani-captures-stunning-infrared-landscapes-of-french-alps/

Fabulous Cover Photos of La Vie Parisienne in 1927

La Vie Parisienne (the Parisian life) was a French weekly magazine founded in Paris in 1863 and was published without interruption until 1970. It was popular at the start of the 20th century. h/t: vintag.es La Vie Parisienne was hugely successful because it combined a new mix of subjects—short stories, veiled gossip and fashion banter, also comments about subjects from love and the arts to the...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/fabulous-cover-photos-of-la-vie-parisienne-in-1927/