The Future Imagined in Albert Robida’s “La vie électrique,” 1890

Electricity.

Who participated in the first video date? A good couple for candidacy in this regard are Georges Lorris and Estelle Lacombe, who meet via “téléphonoscope” in Albert Robida’s 1890 novel Le Vingtième siècle: la vie électrique in which he imagines “the electric life” of the future.

h/t: publicdomainreview

The old world’s dishonesty.

Adding a visual component to two recent technologies, the telephone (1876) and the phonograph (1877), this device lets scattered families in the year 1956 reunite around a virtual dinner table. For the lovebirds Lorris and Lacombe, the téléphonoscope facilitates their unapproved liaison in an immunologically fraught world. (And, for those without a beau, it also offers a service akin to on-demand streaming.)

The Sahara desert made into agricultural land after a climate overhaul.

This proto Zoom/Netflix hybrid is just one of several prescient predictions in Robida’s novel. Frictionless trains shoot through tubes, anticipating the Hyperloop, and doorknockers have been replaced with a “recording phonograph with photographic lens”, allowing residents to both screen visitors and take messages in the event of their absence: a smart doorbell before its time.

The Lauterbrunnen lighthouse.

The tubes (view from an aeronef at 700 meters).

Taking in the evening air.

From exam to exam.

A grand selection of ancestors . . . whose influence will dominate?

The engagement voyage.

Floating dungeons.

The charge of the bicyclists.

Some models from the air fleet.

A torpedo ambush.

The examination for a doctorate in Military Science.

A busy neighbourhood.

The old and the new.

The physical decay of the overrefined.

Our rivers and atmosphere — the multiplication of various pathogens, microbes, and bacteria.

The sophisticated, poisonous chemistry.

The dream of M. Arséne des Marettes.

The miasmatic war.

A national park.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/the-future-imagined-in-albert-robidas-la-vie-electrique-1890/

Space Colony Art from the 1970s

In the 1970s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill, with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University, held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.

h/t: publicdomainreview









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/space-colony-art-from-the-1970s-2/

“Consumed and Controlled”: Our Dark Future in Provoking Artworks by Zach McLean

Zach McLean is a Digital Cinematic Storyteller based in Vancouver.

Consumed and Controlled

“I love creating new worlds. Most recently I’ve become fascinated in how fast the world is changing. Innovation in media and tech has serious effects on society. Good, bad? You choose.”

More: Instagram, Foundation

Where did it come from?

The Only Escape

“There was nowhere else to go. Nowhere was safe. Only in their secret place would they never be found.”

Lost Sheep

スズキ Delivery

“New order ready for delivery.”

Fight The New Drug

“Bringing awareness to a silent drug, that’s often not discussed or questioned. If we want to help stop sex trafficking, a great place to start would be our society’s obsession with porn.”

Watching the sunset on the old 60s Ford GT

Complimentary EV charging at McDonalds

Taking a break to charge their electric Ferrari F40

Boba cyborg, serving you some bubble tea

New work all about information, privacy, and big tech

The Signs

“‘The Signs’ is part of a new series named IN THE BUBBLE. The work is inspired by innovation and the constant changes being seen in the world. Covid-19 has had drastic effects on social norms, healthcare, media, economics, technology and more. Are we in a bubble of innovation? Are the changes permanent and evolving at a rate, which we haven’t seen before?

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/consumed-and-controlled-our-dark-future-in-provoking-artworks-by-zach-mclean/

Kid Literature Illustrations I Do About The Inventions That I Saw In The Year 2098

According to Aaron Shaw: “When I was a kid, all I wanted to do was live in the future. I just could not get enough of the future between the Jetsons, Epcot, and Back to the Future. I simply adored the inventions I imagined would one day fill our lives. But the future never came fast enough, so I began illustrating what I hoped our bright, silly future would bring. These illustrations are part of my collection of crazy goofy future invention illustrations I do to help kids imagine their own fun and wonderful future!”

How Lunch Bags Get Better in 2051

This Ekuuku is an introvert. The worst for him is lunchtime at his bounceable school. Because he is so yellow and has an extra arm, he is quite popular. But he hates it. So every day, he brings his “I’m Disgusting” Lunch Bag invention. This bag makes everyone around him think that they smell disgusting, and thus they scatter to avoid embarrassment. Hooray, isolation for everyone!

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda

How Swimming Gets Better in 2064

Sure, the Niog alien species were not the first to introduce the Never Wet Swim Dress technology, but they definitely brought style to it! This invention makes it so that the person wearing the swim dress never touches the water. In fact, if you jumped in a lake right now, the waters would part for you all the way to the bottom and you would walk out on the dry ground. (Also great for rainy days with no umbrella!)

How Snowballs Get Better in 2058

When a Qweply enters a room, everyone knows it. It is precisely because of this aroma that they receive many Guided Flavor Ball inventions their way. Whisper the flavor you want into the ball and the name of the person you want to hit in the face with it, and within 37 seconds, they will receive a vigorous blow to the noggin. Works anywhere in the galaxy!

How Pot Holes Get Better in 2067

This little guy is what most people call a “pot bot,” but I am sure you can guess why he does not love that nickname :) He and 52,000 of his identical siblings were released onto the road system 37 years ago to fill the potholes. They spend their days dreaming about oil baths while they zip in and out of traffic at 151 miles per hour. They are equipped with special wheels that drop asphalt to fill the gaps within seconds of landing in one. In general, they are a happy bunch and love to be working. Their motto is “potholes are not as good as dinner rolls.” (They were not created with the ability to come up with a good motto.)

How Shirts Are Better in 2079

Frodo here weighs 117 lbs. He and his family bond by watching Lord Of The Rings movie marathons 6 times a year. But Frodo has a dream to be a linebacker. So, in 2079, he invented the Make Me Like Shirt. Put it on and press the button. Your body turns into the same size and shape as the athlete whose Jersey you are wearing. No more hard work to be a big huge muscle head athlete!

How Wrinkles Get Better in 2094

Anna spends most of her time under the ground. As with most giant mole rats of Russia, she has only ever had one man in her life. It is a good less-than-glamorous life, which is why it is a bit surprising that she decided to invent the wrinkle rug. One step on this wrinkle rug and all of your wrinkles begin to transfer the right to the rug! It takes about 3 minutes to remove every wrinkle you have. Works on clothes too!

How Meetings Get Better in 2085

You would think that the lovely ladies of planet Forton just loved meetings how they attend them with such glee. But they don’t. Like humans, they find meetings exhausting and long-winded. So, they invented the shortener. This handy little device shortens every event down to its essentials. Turn a math class into a 15-minute crash course, turn a football game into 14 minutes of actual gameplay, turn those “necessary” meetings into 10 seconds of information that actually pertains to you!

How Poop Will Be Better in 2072

Aplidons love birthdays even more than humans. This is for two reasons: 1) They get a new square that fills in another gap in their body. This square then gives them a new ability like playing the clarinet, hitting a double, or holding scorpions without being stung. 2) They get their new poopsicle. These poopsicles, when eaten, change your poop to the same smell like the flavor of poopsicle! Last year as a joke, everyone got vomit-flavored poopsicles at Frankie’s party. For the next year, bathroom breaks were not so pleasant.

How Hand Washing Gets Better in 2066

The Vilpon race is kind of crazy about germs. It turns out that global pandemics really freak them out. They stop licking toilet seats as soon as they hear about the latest outbreak. Well, because of their need for cleanliness, they also invented the washer detector. Just hang it on the wall by the restroom. Now, whoever comes out of the bathroom without washing their hands will have neon blue glowing fingernails for the next 7 hours. Let the public shaming begin!

How Gloves Get Better in 2077

Highly considered one of the ugliest species to visit the Earth, the Slurtgoes quickly had to invent something to keep the haters at bay. So they came up with the knockout glove. Walk up to someone making fun of your ugly baby, and pop them on the nose. Down they go, knocked out. The glove leads your hand to the perfect knockout blow every time!

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/kid-literature-illustrations-i-do-about-the-inventions-that-i-saw-in-the-year-2098/

Homes of the Future: A Look Back at Charles Schridde’s Stunning ‘60s Ads For Motorola

Charles Schridde was born in 1926 and grew up in rural Illinois. He was an artist from an early age and received a scholarship to the Chicago Art Institute when he was age 17.

He began at the institute, but was then enlisted in the Navy for two years. When he returned from the Navy, Charles began his career as a free-lance commercial illustrator. His major clients included The Saturday Evening Post, Life magazine, Motorola and Chevrolet.

h/t: vintag.es

In 1961, Motorola asked Charles Schridde to envision the homes of the future centered around Motorola’s most recent line of electronics. The ads created by Schridde ran in Life Magazine and The Saturday Evening Post from 1961 to 1963 and depicted an optimistic future made of lavish, elegant, dream-homes, where domestic technologies and serene landscapes coexisted harmoniously.

Through his stunning drawings, we were offered a fascinating glimpse of what the past thought the future would be like, and how home technology companies capitalized on their consumers’ minds by swaying them in the direction that these electronic products were relevant to that ultimate future.


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/homes-of-the-future-a-look-back-at-charles-schriddes-stunning-60s-ads-for-motorola/

The Futuristic World as Envisioned by Echte Wagner Advertising Cards, 1930

These future fantasy collectible cards were published by the German company Echte Wagner in the first half of the 20th century. Originally Echte Wagner made margarine, and it made a lot of trade cards that were distributed all over Central Europe. In 1930, the True Wagner Margarine created a series of books designed as a display for a collection of stickers made available separately. In this book, there’s a section called Future Fantasy which has no artist or author credited.

The illustrations are beautiful, the technology is actually quite brilliant and not so far-fetched. The book is called Echte Wagner Margarine Album Nr. 3, Serien 12 und 13 (Genuine Wagner Margarine Album Nr. 3″, series 12 and 13). It was published by Elmshorn in Holstein, Germany.

Wireless Private Phone and Television

“Each person has their own transmitter and receiver and can communicate with friends and relatives using certain wavelengths. But television technology has become so advanced that people can talk and watch their friends in real-time. The transmitter and receiver are no longer bound to the location but are carried in a box the size of a photo apparatus.”

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Monorails

“To increase the speed of traffic, there’s a single-lane expressway. The cars are designed to minimize air resistance. To ensure that the train does derail, which would be a disaster at 500 km, it is supported by stabilization surfaces.”

The Artificial Island

“Since there is no island located on the shortest route to America which could serve as a port, it’s a good idea to create an artificial landing place on the ocean. Of course, there are hotels, spas, restaurants, and a movie theater, so the passengers can enjoy their trip if there is a storm delaying the flight.”

The Rocket Plane

“The aircraft of the future is powered by rockets. The rockets are fitted at the stern of the vessel, which propels the aircraft forward through the recoil of the escaping gases. The aircraft shown here is cruising toward Nankoupas and the ancient Great Wall Of China with 10,000 kilograms of mail. Since it has a speed of 1,000 km per hour, it takes less than 8 hours for the Berlin-Tokyo route. A steamer today needs about 50 days!”

The Rocket Airships

“The rocket planes are in huge proportions and they are shaped like a parabola. The lavishly furnished cabins are built into the wings and hold almost 400 passengers. Because there is no fuselage, the control fins are located at the ends of the wings. The driver’s cab, from which the rockets are managed, is located in the middle of the deck.”

New Highways

“The horses are gone and electricity has replaced the steam power. The pedestrians are no longer in danger from traffic because the motorways and sidewalks are strictly separated. All men and women wear uniform clothing: zipped suits and pants.”

An airship ready to land

“The airship displayed above is about to land in its giant pad. It is no longer lifted by gas and driven by engines, it has a built-in transformer that is able to harness gravity into repulsive force. Now it’s possible to raise, lower, and move huge payloads.”

A New Driving Force (Nuclear-Powered Cars)

“The future cars are powered by tiny engines that use nuclear power. The speed of cars has grown accordingly. The reach speed of 200 to 300 kilometers an hour on city roads. On highways, speeds of 1,000 km/h are quite common!”

An Oceanic Steamer

“The shape of the steamer has changed and the bulky constructions have disappeared, not even a chimney can be seen. The ship shown here carries 20,000 passengers in two days from Hamburg to New York.”

Landing Of A Spaceship On The Moon

“Is this depiction wrong? Shouldn’t the rockets ignite at the stern of the vessel and spew their fire back? No, it’s correct! The ship is landing, it has deployed the brake rockets and has quickly reduced its speed. Now you can easily make the landing on the Moon.”

Private Aircraft With Nuclear Propulsion

“Here we have the opportunity to see a plane. But, where is the propeller? That is none! The aircraft rises and comes down vertically. The engine is a small capsule, in which the nuclear reaction takes place. On the right side, you can see the airplane’s garage.”

Spaceship Port

“Because there are rare minerals on the Moon, America has built a $20 billion enterprise named MoMA-A.G. (Moon Minerals A.G.). At this dock station, the ships can renew their rocket fuel. The station floats freely in the space.”

Cars powered by nuclear power

Getting ready to launch a rocket to the Moon

A rocket among the stars

A rocket flying toward Sun and Mercury

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/the-futuristic-world-as-envisioned-by-echte-wagner-advertising-cards-1930/

Charing and Relaxing At SPACE IN PAUSE With Veliz Architecto

Veliz Architecto created a future architecture “SPACE IN PAUSE” for Service Station.

Can you imagine a Tesla charging station in the middle of the sea? When we can travel by air vehicles, everything will be at our fingertips, the most distant places will be closer and closer, so I imagine a future Architecture with rest spaces between intermediate points and that work to supply the vehicles with any energy to continue the journey where people can eat and enjoy the landscape in order to take time to relax. This concept is based on future analysis.

More: Instagram, Facebook h/t: visualatelier8




SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/charing-and-relaxing-at-space-in-pause-with-veliz-architecto/

Walter Pichler’s Futuristic Visions from the ’60s

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

Prototypes, a series of sculptures made in the ’60s by Walter Pichler, explore the overlap of architecture/design/sculpture. The materials (polyester, Plexiglas, PVC, aluminum, inflatable elements) used by the Austrian artist were new at the time.

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

Around forty-five years ago a man wore a submarine-like white helmet that extended from front to back. His entire head disappeared into the futurist capsule; only the title betraying what was happening. TV Helmet created in 1967 is a technical device that isolates the user while imbedding him or her in an endless web of information: closed off against the outside world, the wearer was completely focused on the screen before his eyes.

TV-Helmet (Portable living room), 1967

TV Helmet is the work of Walter Pichler and it doesn’t merely formally anticipate the cyber glasses developed decades later; Pichler also articulated questions of content in relation to the media experience long before the “virtual world” was even discovered. Even back then, Walter Pichler was probably already a media critic as he’s remained one to this day. But he is also a conceptually thinking artist who explored space early on—beyond the four walls and the structures of cities. Pichler called his invention a Portable Living Room. His pioneering designs, The Prototypes, are pneumatic plastic living bubbles from the sixties that sought answers to the questions of tomorrow’s individualized life somewhere between the areas of design, architecture, and art. With their reference to space travel and modernist materials, Pichler’s futurist sculptures inspire a desire for the future— even if his messages are said to possess a sceptical or sarcastic undertone.

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

Pichler wrote these words in 1962, on the eve of an exhibition on which he collaborated with fellow Viennese architect Hans Hollein.

“(Architecture) is born of the most powerful thoughts. For men it will be a compulsion, they will stifle in it or they will live – live, as I mean the word … (Architecture) has no consideration for stupidity and weakness. It never serves. It crushes those who cannot bear it… Machines have taken possession of [architecture] and human beings are now merely tolerated in its domain. “

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

A statement of singular nihilism, unabashed iconoclasm; a statement Ulrich Conrads once called “the most absolute thesis” in all twentieth century architecture. In the sixties, after studying at the Hochschule für Architektur in Vienna, he worked with his friend, the internationally renowned architect Hans Hollein, on a new concept of architecture. In 1963, the two exhibited together at the Galerie nächst St. Stephan under the title Architecture. Hollein and he explored utopian architectonic designs; they countered the growing subdivision of the city with a larger modernist vision made from cement, declaring architecture “freed from the constraints of building.”

Walter Pichler, Small Room Prototype no.4, 1967

TV Helmet/Portable Living Room (1967) and Small Room (1967) are to be worn, while the unrealized Intensivbox is a spherical chamber into which a subject is slid on a track. These isolating simulators remove one from a given reality and can be seen as the ultimate conclusion of technology’s encroachment on the body. Constructed of plastic and embedded with television sets and speakers, these helmets enhance the television experience to the detriment of all else. Pichler hoped to isolate and insulate himself (and his viewers) from the pitfalls of consumerism and media obsession, but in his helmets this took the form of a literal representation of such pitfalls. The “consumer” is isolated from her environment, but within the helmet only media are permitted as input. These works can are also a critique of his one-time collaborator Hans Hollein’s ironic assertion that “everything is architecture.”

Head of the Movable Figure

Walter Pichler (Courtesy Contenporary Fine Arts, Berlin. Photo: Elfie Semotan)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/walter-pichlers-futuristic-visions-from-the-60s/

Here’s How People From The Past Imagined The Future

An Artists Depiction Of The Future, Painted In 1930

Let’s face it – most of us would like to see what the future holds. And while that’s not really possible, it did not stop some people in the past from trying – often with some pretty optimistic results.

When it comes to predictions of the future, it’s a hit-or-miss situation – while some people actually managed to predict it rather accurately, many of them look pretty hilarious today. From rolling bakeries to luxurious flying hotels – check out a collection of future predictions from the past in the gallery below!

h/t: demilked

1940s Vision Of Food Delivery Future

Self Driving Cars Of The Future, Circa 1960

We Really Messed Up

The Future Of Phones, 1956

A Fifties Navigation System. Don’t Know Who Imagined This But I Love It!

1970s Futuristic Concept For Jetliner Air Travel

2022

Television Newspaper – Some Day You May Be Able To Receive The Front Page Of Your Morning Newspaper This Way

James Bond Receives A “Text” Via His Smartwatch In The Spy Who Loved Me

‘Ship’s Cat’ By Keith Spangle

1981 Vision Of Suburbia After There’s No More Room Left For Suburbs

How NASA Imagined Life In Space

Artoo Deco

1969 Japanese Vision Of The Future Classroom, The Odd Part Is That Included Small Robots To Rap Students On The Head When Misbehaving

Fashions Of 1950, As Predicted On The Cover Of Life Magazine In 1914

Futuristic Road Trip With The Family (Bruce Mccall)

VR In 1989

Home Shopping In The 1940s

Soviet Vision Of The Future In The 1930s

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/heres-how-people-from-the-past-imagined-the-future/

“Someone Else’s Dream”: ’80s-Inspired Illustrations by James White

James White aka Signalnoise is a Canadian illustrator and designer living in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. He creates neon-infused artwork for his various personal projects as well as for clients such as Lego Movie 2, Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon, Hasbro, Metallica, Nike, Universal Music etc.

He’s very stuck in the 1980s.

More: Signalnoise, Behance













































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/someone-elses-dream-80s-inspired-illustrations-by-james-white/