Machinalia : Boris Artzybasheff’s Surreal Visions of Living Machines

Boris Artzybasheff (25 May 1899 – 16 July 1965) was born in Kharkiv, Ukraine. In 1919 he arrived in New York City and began work as an engraver. He illustrated 50 books, many of which he wrote, and scores of magazines, including Life, Fortune, and more than 200 covers for Time.

After 1940, he devoted himself to commercial art, including advertisements for Xerox, Shell Oil, Pan Am, Casco Power Tools, Alcoa Steamship lines, Parke-Davis, Avco Manufacturing, Scotch Tape, Wickwire Spencer Steele, Vultee Aircraft, World Airways, and Parker Pens.

In commercial work he explored anthropomorphism, where machines displayed human attributes, the so-called Machinalia.

Included here are some of Artzybasheff’s adverts for the Wickwire Spencer Steel Company of New York City. Published in 1942, the adverts called on readers to “help end the war” by collecting scrap iron.

h/t: flashbak

“I am thrilled by machinery’s force, precision and willingness to work at any task, no matter how arduous or monotonous it may be. I would rather watch a thousand ton dredge dig a canal than see it done by a thousand spent slaves lashed into submission. I like machines,” he wrote.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/machinalia-boris-artzybasheffs-surreal-visions-of-living-machines/

Machinalia : Boris Artzybasheff’s Surreal Visions of Living Machines

Boris Artzybasheff (25 May 1899 – 16 July 1965) was born in Kharkiv, Ukraine. In 1919 he arrived in New York City and began work as an engraver. He illustrated 50 books, many of which he wrote, and scores of magazines, including Life, Fortune, and more than 200 covers for Time.

After 1940, he devoted himself to commercial art, including advertisements for Xerox, Shell Oil, Pan Am, Casco Power Tools, Alcoa Steamship lines, Parke-Davis, Avco Manufacturing, Scotch Tape, Wickwire Spencer Steele, Vultee Aircraft, World Airways, and Parker Pens.

In commercial work he explored anthropomorphism, where machines displayed human attributes, the so-called Machinalia.

Included here are some of Artzybasheff’s adverts for the Wickwire Spencer Steel Company of New York City. Published in 1942, the adverts called on readers to “help end the war” by collecting scrap iron.

h/t: flashbak

“I am thrilled by machinery’s force, precision and willingness to work at any task, no matter how arduous or monotonous it may be. I would rather watch a thousand ton dredge dig a canal than see it done by a thousand spent slaves lashed into submission. I like machines,” he wrote.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/machinalia-boris-artzybasheffs-surreal-visions-of-living-machines/

Universo Chatarra: The Scrap Universe of Alejandro Burdisio

Argentinian artist Alejandro Burdisio (previously) presents us with a melancholy future that does not forget the past. After studying architecture and sharpening his pencils as a draftsman, Burdisio has made a career for himself as a concept artist.

In his free time, Burdisio creates a digital illustration world with heavy political undertones, defined by the architectural and automotive iconography of a particular period in Argentinian history—what he calls Universo Chatarra.

More: Artstation, Instagram

“I’ve been drawing since forever. I’m an only child and remember that when I was five or six my mom used to take me with her whenever she had to run errands, so I always found a corner to sit and draw in my little sketchbook until she was done. I drew all the time, although I went through a typical teenage “rebellious” period in which I didn’t touch a pencil. When it comes to drawing, my formal education started right after I served in the army; I started taking painting classes and enrolled in a graphic design course. I had to choose between that path and architecture. I chose architecture. That’s when I truly started learning about perspective, to understand space, to acknowledge my surroundings and to “read” the city.

I began to fine tune my observational skills, to collect details and look upwards, where I really could appreciate the city as a whole. When most people walk, their vision is limited to the horizon line; they seldom look up. Up there I find details like statues carrying the weight of the facades, gargoyles, domes, etc. All of this contributes to the content that informs my illustration work. It’s wonderful to be able to appreciate history as told by an old building. You just have to look up,” he told Visualounge.

“There’s always an emotional or sociopolitical load. Many people think I’m a staunch Peronist, because I use plenty of Peronist political vocabulary, but that’s simply because that’s the only party that shaped the urban landscape—as it had its own architectural style. I don’t identify with any specific political party.

I don’t have an optimistic view of what technology can do for us, as human behavior leaves much to be desired. I include a lot of corrugated roofing in my work, which is a symbol of poverty all over Latin America. Many folks from countries like Pakistan, India, and Turkey empathize with my illustrations; they certainly understand the meaning of corrugated roofing, perhaps because poverty is more explicit in the developing world. An American may see those roof panels as quaint or colorful, but I believe they may not read it as a symbol.”












































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/universo-chatarra-the-scrap-universe-of-alejandro-burdisio/

1959 Ghia Selene by Tom Tjaarda, an Amazing Concept From Future Past From Italy

A very talented man called Tom Tjaarda became one of GHIA’s main stylists, and he made a big impression with the 1959 Selene, a sort of super-sleek forward-control “people carrier”. Its follow-up, the Selene II of 1962, had a central driving seat and two rear seats facing backwards. h/t: vintag.es The 1959 Ghia Selene came out of the famed Italian design house, but the vehicle’s unique...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/09/1959-ghia-selene-by-tom-tjaarda-an-amazing-concept-from-future-past-from-italy/

1960 Ford Spaceliner, a Vehicle That Looks a Bit Like a Spaceship From a Science-Fiction Movie

There was a time when bubbletop concept cars were all the rage, both in the design studios of Detroit as well as on the hot rod and custom car show circuit. They ranged from mildly modified factory cars to one-off, completely fabricated show machines with exposed engines and wild paint jobs. Guys like Ed “Big Daddy” Roth, Darryl Starbird, and Dean Jeffries made a name for themselves building these...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/09/1960-ford-spaceliner-a-vehicle-that-looks-a-bit-like-a-spaceship-from-a-science-fiction-movie/

Home Office from The Future Past: Maurice-Claude Vidili’s Sphère D’isolation, Model No. S2

This iconic and multifunctional piece emblematic of futuristic 1970s design presents with a solid white shell within which two benches and a shelving unit are incorporated. When seen in person, the lighting system presents with a slightly cooler, whiter light than pictured in the catalogue photography. The painted steel surfaces present with surface and textural irregularities throughout which are...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/09/home-office-from-the-future-past-maurice-claude-vidilis-sphere-disolation-model-no-s2/

“Women of The Future” According to The French Artist Albert Bergeret, 1902

In 1902, a French manufacturer released a set of trading cards designed by artist Albert Bergeret that imagined the “women of the future” (original: Les Femmes de l’Avenir). These cards depict various, imagined occupations that would have seemed fantastical to most ladies at the time: doctor, lawyer, politician, firefighter, even members of the military. h/t: rarehistoricalphotos Firefighter.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/09/women-of-the-future-according-to-the-french-artist-albert-bergeret-1902/

The Paul Milinski Retro Futuristic Dreamscapes Are Serenity Manifest

Everyone has a “place” or at least an idea of a place where they mentally seek refuge. Perhaps in those quiet moments of daytime fantasy, perhaps simply in the act of disassociation. Until further notice, here’s where you’ll find me whenever I’m at less than 90% of focus – unwinding within the serene dreamscapes designed by one Paul Milinski. More: Instagram h/t:

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/06/the-paul-milinski-retro-futuristic-dreamscapes-are-serenity-manifest/

Concepts From Future Past: Autobianchi Runabout

Revealed at the 1969 Turin Motor Show, Bertone showed off this wild ride which looks a bit like what might have happened if Speed Racer’s Mach 5 mated with a powerboat. h/t: 95octane The car was designed by Marcello Gandini, and was powered by mid- mounted 1.1L Fiat 128 engine and matching 4-speed gearbox. Beyond its funky wedge shape and low profile, one of the most unusual design elements of the...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/02/concepts-from-future-past-autobianchi-runabout/

Created From The Recycled Tire Tubes, The Pangolin By Cyclus Takes Backpacks To Another Level

2010’s Steel Pencil Design Award winner, the Pangolin by Cyclus takes backpacks to another level. Handmade by Colombian people in need and consisted of recycled tire inner tubes, the backpack is inspired by the pangolin, a mammal that possesses large keratin scales covering its skin for protection. More: Pangolin Recalling this exoskeleton, the design, instead of following the standard...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/08/created-from-the-recycled-tire-tubes-the-pangolin-by-cyclus-takes-backpacks-to-another-level/