Japanese Modeler Shows a Clever 100-Yen Store Trick to Turn Your Figures Into Frozen Prisoners and Warriors

Figure and acrylic modeling artist @ume_k_bou writes in his Twitter profile that his motto for his craft is “free, easy, and dirty self-satisfaction”, and a quick look at his works proves that to be true. One of his most recent works involves a little DIY creation to “freeze” your models to give them an aesthetic boost that can be done with the help of a 100 yen store and household items.

A simple touch-up of a case that turns your figures into cryogenically frozen warriors or prisoners!

More: Twitter h/t: grapee

ume_k_bou writes that he simply took a case from a 100-yen store and applied dabs of baking soda to its insides, and then placed the figures inside.










SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/japanese-modeler-shows-a-clever-100-yen-store-trick-to-turn-your-figures-into-frozen-prisoners-and-warriors/

Japanese Photographer Captures Beautiful Dreamy Landscapes of Kamakura in Infrared

Kamakura is a popular tourist spot and a great day-trip from the Tokyo area. The seaside Japanese city is not only known for surfing (at Yuigahama Beach), it’s also home to dozens of Shinto Shrines and Buddhist temples, including Kōtoku-in Temple’s famous Great Buddha.

It’s often on the list of places to visit for foreigners coming to Japan. But even if you’re one of the many people who have visited Kamakura before, you’ve probably never seen it quite like this…

Japanese photographer Yuuui lists three interests on his Twitter profile when it comes to photography: The first two are street snaps, and minimal photography, but the third one is infrared photography. He also explains that he likes to “record the beauty that is often overlooked in everyday life” in his photographs.

Through infrared photography, he does indeed show us a completely different side of life…

More: Instagram, Twitter h/t: grapee



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/japanese-photographer-captures-beautiful-dreamy-landscapes-of-kamakura-in-infrared/

“Broken Promises”: 80s Anime Aesthetic in Artworks by Ana Aleksov

Anime emerged when Japanese filmmakers discovered and began to use American, German, French and Russian animation strategies within the first 1900s.

The preliminary consultant of animation strategies in Japan is the artist named Osami Tezuka. He is the primary ever to deliver the Japanese along with up to date anime. At a early age, Osami Tezuka tries to shoot small animations together with his digital camera, based mostly on the works of producers named Walt Disney and Max Fleischer. The artists who observe Osami Tezuka, who’s the pioneer of the anime, create a brand new model referred to as anime.

More: Ana Aleksov, Instagram

Contemplating the excessive budgets America devotes to the movie trade, the little finances of the Japanese cinema sector along with having much less actors that resemble western actors push Japan in to the anime sector versus the movie trade. The anime trade’s alternatives, comfort and far wider world help the choice and improvement of the anime trade in Japan.

Manga drawings in Japan began initially to draw intense curiosity concerning the 1970s. This curiosity permits manga for use in animations. The extraordinary curiosity of anime and manga makes Osami Tezuka a legend and promotes it to the “Father of the Animation“.

With the efforts of Osami Tezuka and his followers, the present state of the anime begins to emerge. Go Nagai and different mangacas develop the best way that Osami Tezuka, referred to as Mecha, which shapes the animations associated to robots, opens within the mecha model. Mecha-type animations, which confirmed a big leap within the 1980s, went down ever because the classics of this period.

Within the 1980s, anime proves itself as an essential sector by Japan and manufacturing begins with nice investments. With the gaining significance of animes, the worth and curiosity in manga reaches excessive ranges. The animations that grew in Japan in 1980 elevated their recognition all through the world within the 1990s and 2000s.

As for the Ana Aleksov, I could not find any information about her…

























































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/broken-promises-80s-anime-aesthetic-in-artworks-by-ana-aleksov/

A Japanese Artist Created a Minimalist Campaign for Sony PlayStation

Japanese artist Cokohore11 transposes PlayStation’s codes into real life. It’s not an official campaign, but it’s very clean. Unfortunately, there is no information about the artist.

More: Instagram, Twitter



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/a-japanese-artist-created-a-minimalist-campaign-for-sony-playstation/

Pandemics Past, Green Futures Merge in Ceramic Gas Mask Pot from Franco-Japanese Project

TENEO, a fashion brand embodying the finest elements of French and Japanese materials and production, has teamed up with master ceramicist Shibukusa Ryūzō, 7th generation of the Shibukusa Ryūzō Ceramics Factory operating since 1841 in Takayama City, Gifu Prefecture, on a bold new project.

More: TENEO, Instagram, Shibukusa Ryūzō, Yusuke Hamamoto h/t: grapee

The first phase of this project, which started with the main theme of “making traditional crafts into art pieces that can be used naturally in our daily lives,” was designed to realize a new form of traditional crafts in the midst of the drastically changing times brought about by COVID-19.

The gas mask, which is often associated with negative images such as anxiety and fear, was adopted as the design base as a symbol of pandemics past. By planting and arranging plants and fresh flowers, which have positive images such as reassurance and healing, as well as symbols of the future, TENEO hopes to convey the message of looking forward without forgetting the hardships and chaos of 2020.

Mr. Shibukusa, inheriting the traditions of the crafts-rich city of Takayama, has fully applied his finely-honed modeling skills to create two kinds of Gas Mask Pot:

One is a fully handmade model, in which he finishes the entire production process by his own hands, and the other is a semi-handmade model, in which he uses multiple molds and then finishes the details by hand. Both versions are available in bonsai pot and flower pot versions.

The main visuals feature bonsai by Yusuke Hamamoto, a young bonsai artist who is attracting worldwide attention for his traditional style.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/pandemics-past-green-futures-merge-in-ceramic-gas-mask-pot-from-franco-japanese-project/

Sotoko, the Japanese Artist Who Draws Minimalistic Illustrations of Short-Haired Girls

A few months ago, I came upon a Japanese artist’s Instagram page: @e.sotoko. The minimalistic illustrations immediately captured my heart, so I decided to follow the account.

Sotoko tries to express the beauty of women in few strokes and simple lines. The artist is very fond of short hairstyles on girls, and most of the drawings feature short-hair ladies with a cool yet elegant style. For those interested in the tools used to create such refined art, the artist discloses that the tools used are an Ipad and an Apple pencil. Sotoko also uses Clip Studio Paint Ex as editing software and says that daily practice is crucial.

More: Instagram h/t: grapee




































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/sotoko-the-japanese-artist-who-draws-minimalistic-illustrations-of-short-haired-girls/

Photographer Ryosuke Kosuge Capures The Kengo Kuma-Designed Bookshelf Theater In The Kadokawa Culture Museum

The Kadokawa Culture Museum is a Tokyo-based cultural complex that opened its doors just last year. The complex houses many temporary and permanent exhibitions, as well as natural history and anime museums.

However, one of its most impressive attractions has to be the Bookshelf Theater – an enormous library with eight-meter tall bookshelves designed by Kengo Kuma that contains over 50,000 publications from various Japanese publishers and private collections. Recently, this impressive Bookshelf Theater was captured by Japanese photographer Ryosuke Kosuge, aka RK (previously), and the photos are absolutely breathtaking.

More: Ryosuke Kosuge, Instagram, Kadokawa Culture Museum h/t: demilked



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/photographer-ryosuke-kosuge-capures-the-kengo-kuma-designed-bookshelf-theater-in-the-kadokawa-culture-museum/

Japanese Artist Paints Hyperrealistic Paintings That Are So Precise You Might Confuse Them With Photos

This time, I want to present an incredible gallery of pictures of… paintings. Although it might be hard to believe these were actually painted by a human hand, this is a true representation of the beauty and power of talent and hard work.

Japanese painter Kei Mieno creates painstakingly detailed and realistic paintings that can be easily mistaken for photographs. Let’s admit, the kinds of photographs not everyone would be able to take. Colors, lights, shadows, contrasts, texture—everything comes together to create incredibly lifelike artwork. The remarkably skillful artist, who celebrates his 36th birthday today, uses oil to bring his hyperrealistic ideas to life.

More: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter h/t: boredpanda




































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/japanese-artist-paints-hyperrealistic-paintings-that-are-so-precise-you-might-confuse-them-with-photos/

New Naaan Bread Clocks Made from Real Bread Take Inspiration from Dali and a Japanese Pun

PAMPSHADE by Yukiko Morita (previously) is a brand of handmade goods that literally light up the life of bread lovers. The company’s name, a hybrid of “pan” (bread) and and “lampshade”, takes actual slices and loaves of bread, and after giving them an antimicrobial treatment, turns them into one-of-a-kind decorative lamps and clocks.

More: PAMPSHADE, Instagram h/t: grapee

Their latest creative bread release is inspired by the Surrealist artist Salvador Dali’s famous painting, The Persistence of Memory, and combines it with a Japanese pun for asking the time: melting naan bread clocks!

The Japanese pun, while perhaps known to be a bit corny, is well known. One way to ask “what time is it?” in Japanese is “今何時ですか?”(Ima nanji desu ka?), and in the context of being at perhaps an Indian restaurant or in the presence of naan, someone lacking shame in their sense of humor may make the wordplay quip of “今ナン時ですか?”(Ima naan ji desu ka?).

The result is an eye-catching timepiece that will be sure to impress art fans, Japanese bread jokesters, and of course, naan enthusiasts all at once!



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/new-naaan-bread-clocks-made-from-real-bread-take-inspiration-from-dali-and-a-japanese-pun/

Felt Artist’s Terrifyingly Real Roomba Cat Creation Glides and Meows when Summoned

Sacocho is an artist, who actually describes himself as a person who combines wool felt artistry and technology to create a crazy cat cafe. A couple years ago, the talented artist gained a lot of attention for crafting realistic (and somewhat creepy) felt cat roombas and monorails.

More: Instagram h/t: grapee

Sacocho is once again turning heads with his feline Frankenstein’s creations, this time with a hyper realistic felt cat Roomba that responds to calling, rotates its head, and actually meows!

That’s just one of Sacocho’s many crawling cat creations.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/felt-artists-terrifyingly-real-roomba-cat-creation-glides-and-meows-when-summoned/