Artist Shows Us What Famous Characters Would Look Like In Real Life

Cartoon characters are far from being realistic and most of us can’t even imagine what they would look like if they existed in real life. That’s when artists come to the rescue and show us what famous characters would be like if they were more human.

Hossein Diba went beyond just drawing these characters in 2D, this artist makes full characters using 3D software and the result speaks for itself. The 3D models are full of tiny details and hard work, perfectly transforming the cartoon characters we all know and love.

Click here and here for Hossein’s previous articles.

More: Artstation, Instagram h/t: boredpanda


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/artist-shows-us-what-famous-characters-would-look-like-in-real-life/

Amazing Snapshots Capture Street Life in New York City From the Mid-1930s to the End of the 1940s

In the late 1930s, photographer Helen Levitt rode the New York City subway system, first as an apprentice to photographer Walker Evans, then snapping photos of aloof passengers wearing fur coats, flat-brim hats, and antique brooches.

h/t: vintag.es

Yet for the majority of Levitt’s illustrious career (lasting until the 1990s), she ventured out of the underground to document life on Manhattan streets. She captured authentic moments — children playing on the sidewalk or dressing up for Halloween, a group of women gossiping — in neighborhoods including Harlem, the Lower East Side, and the Garment District.

Levitt spoke about her early pictures shot on the streets in the 1930s: “It was a good neighborhood for taking pictures in those days, because that was before television. There was a lot happening. And the older people would be sitting out on the stoops because of the heat. Those neighborhoods were very active.”

The New York Times, in 2009, described her as: “a major photographer of the 20th century who caught fleeting moments of surpassing lyricism, mystery and quiet drama on the streets of her native New York”.


























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/amazing-snapshots-capture-street-life-in-new-york-city-from-the-mid-1930s-to-the-end-of-the-1940s/

Still Life in 1960s New York in Beautiful Memorabilia Photographs by Evelyn Hofer

In the 1960s and 70s, German-born photographer Evelyn Hofer (January 21, 1922 – November 2, 2009) pointed her lens at New York City’s people and places. The pictures show us the city, and let New Yorkers know how the rest of the world saw them. You can see these and more photographs in Evelyn Hofer: New York.

h/t: flashbak

Hotdog stand, 1963, New York

Car park, 1964, New York

Arteries, 1964, New York

View from FDR Drive downtown, 1964, New York

Modern Babylon, 1964, New York

Santo Domingo in New York, 1964

Policeman, 59th Street, 1964, New York

Man on roof, 1981, New York

L train station, New York, 1964

The Bowery, 1963, New York

Three boys at the front door, 1975, New York

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/still-life-in-1960s-new-york-in-beautiful-memorabilia-photographs-by-evelyn-hofer/

Photographer Captures the Decadence and Conflict of Russia’s Turbulent 2010s

A lot of photographers have tried to capture the peculiarities of Russia’s day-to-day life, but no-one does quite like Konstantin Tishshe. The Ural-based independent photographer documents the ambivalent reality of the 2010s and the unconventional beauty of coming of age in Russia’s outskirts. The teenagers he documents — idealist, quixotic and lost — are in constant search of connection, whether through a smartphone or at wild house parties.

He started his eponymous Tishshe almost a decade ago, when he turned to photography in an attempt to capture the decadence, idealism, resistance, and social conflict he encountered both in his hometown of Beryozovsky — a small industrial town close to the Ural city of Yekaterinburg — and across the country as a whole.

More: Instagram h/t: calvertjournal

Tishshe, the Russian word for “be quiet”, is an appropriately sarcastic response to the oppression that takes place in Russia.

“The concept of a foreign enemy, propagandised by the Russian authorities, is manifested in ubiquitous fences that turn the streets into prison corridors of some sort. Fences and gates are details of a bigger system, the inhabitable fear,” Tishshe comments.






































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/photographer-captures-the-decadence-and-conflict-of-russias-turbulent-2010s/

Outstanding Color Autochromes from Pre-Revolutionary Russia

These outstanding autochrome pictures of pre-Revolutionary Russia were taken by Peter Ivanovich Vedenisov (1866-1937), a graduate from the Moscow conservatory. He settled in to Yalta, working as a professional pianist, vice-chairman of the Yalta branch of the Russian musical society, founder of the Yalta religious-philosophical society and an avid meteorologist. But Vedenisov’s passion lay in photography.

h/t: flashbak

Among the images of people in tranquil settings before all hell broke loose are pictures of his wife, Vera, her mother, Elena Frantsevna Bazileva, and Andrey and Sofia Nikolaevna’s children, Vera, Natasha, Nick, Lisa and Tanya.

There’s something haunting about autochromes – natural colour images made without need for artificial colourising – their painterly quality, perhaps, give them a spiritual quality. It’s as if, the longer you look at them the more the subject comes to life.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/outstanding-color-autochromes-from-pre-revolutionary-russia/

Incredible Color Photographs That Show What Life Was Really Like in Britain in the 1950s

Unemployment was very low in the 1950s and it was a long period of prosperity. In the early part of the decade, there was still rationing. However, food rationing ended in 1954. In the 1950s living standards in Britain rose considerably. In the late 1950s, Britain became an affluent society. By 1959 about two-thirds of British homes had a vacuum cleaner. However, even in 1960, only 44% of homes had a washing machine.

h/t: vintag.es

In the early 1950s, many homes in Britain still did not have bathrooms and only had outside lavatories. But slum clearance began in the late 1950s.

Meanwhile in the 1950s large numbers of West Indians arrived in Britain. Also from the 1950s, many Asians came. In the late 20th century Britain became a multi-cultural society. Also, in the 1950s young people had significant disposable income for the first time. A distinct ‘youth culture’ emerged, with teddy boys. A revolution in music was led by Elvis Presley and Bill Haley.

The way people shopped also changed. In the early 20th century people usually went to small local shops such as a baker or butcher. The shops usually did deliveries. If you went to the butcher you paid for meat and a butcher’s boy on a bicycle delivered it. The first supermarket in Britain opened in 1948. Fish fingers went on sale in 1955.

Cars increased in number after World War II. By 1959 32% of households owned a car. The first zebra crossing was introduced in 1949. Lollipop men and women followed in 1953. The first parking meters in Britain were installed in London in 1958.

TV first became common in the 1950s. A lot of people bought a TV set to watch the coronation of Elizabeth II and a survey at the end of that year showed that about one-quarter of households had one. By 1959 about two-thirds of homes had a TV. At first, there was only one TV channel but between 1955 and 1957 the ITV companies began broadcasting.



























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/incredible-color-photographs-that-show-what-life-was-really-like-in-britain-in-the-1950s/

Quarantine Life With A Cat In Cute Illustration By Annada Menon

Food Baby With Floof Baby

According to Annada: “These were made in the month of February of 2021. Several people during the lockdown were unable to travel back home to their families in 2020. There are people who were/are stuck in the city of their jobs currently working from home. With the current situation of another major lockdown in India, many will relate to these illustrations.

So here is an ode to those who are indulging in new hobbies, working from home, relaxing, and most importantly, being accompanied by a floof to get by each day.”

More: Instagram, Behance, Patreon h/t: boredpanda

14th Feb – Floofs Are The Best Valentine

A 5 Minute Break At The Work Desk

Movie Nights On A Weekend

Grooving To The Best Music With You

Waking Up Is Difficult On Some Days

Taking Up Painting… Those Surprise Sneezes Though

Snacks Just Call Out To You Every Time You Set Foot In The Kitchen

The Best Weights For A Workout

Discovering Money In Those Freshly Laundered Clothes

Baking With The Best Company

Those Post Work Stretches

Trying On Good Clothes Them To Check If I Still Fit Into Them

Best Time To Test Those Green Fingers

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/quarantine-life-with-a-cat-in-cute-illustration-by-annada-menon/

Inspiring & Rare Color Photographs Of Everyday Life In Hong Kong From The Photographer Fan Ho

Here are rare and beautiful color photographs from Master photographer Fan Ho. We have seen a lot of his Black and White photographs, but in this collection, we are presenting his colorwork.

Fan Ho (1931–2016) is a China-born photographer, film director, and actor. He spent his early years in Shanghai, where he began taking photographs after receiving his first camera at the age of fourteen. He moved to Hong Kong in 1949, and from the 1950s onwards gained considerable attention for his striking photographs of everyday life in Hong Kong.




















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/inspiring-rare-color-photographs-of-everyday-life-in-hong-kong-from-the-photographer-fan-ho/

Amusing Illustrations That Share Insights About Everyday Life And Psychology

What if we’re not as bad as we think we are? Is it okay to feel sad or angry? What will your dog bark at next? Do we just imagine all of our problems, or do they really exist?

These, and other questions about life and general existence are tough to answer, but it seems that Grace Miceli has an answer to most of these important and not-so-important questions. And she does it in a way that’s very amusing and sometimes even very funny. I don’t know why, but there’s just something funny about seeing a cereal box with a message of existential horror. Grace sheds a colorful light onto these existential moments in her own unique style and brightens our often grim and anxious modern reality.

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda






















































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/amusing-illustrations-that-share-insights-about-everyday-life-and-psychology/

Photographer Captures Everyday Life In Mozambique, Here Are His Best Shots

There’s nothing like candid everyday life realities to inspire street photographers. One of them is a talented photographer and a French language teacher, Grégory Escande, who captures cheerful moments as well as hardships of people living in Maputo, Mozambique, which is considered one of the poorest countries in the world.

Born in Spain and raised in the south of France, Escande moved to Africa 20 years ago and chooses to have a “studio on the street” to create a beautiful and authentic portrait of the capital of Mozambique through vibrant and striking photos. He captures scenes that are so common there that they would go unnoticed, such as mothers and their children, men recycling and selling products on the streets, and kids playing, and shares them with the rest of the world. He takes both genuine and unstaged portraits and recreates the scenes he sees in the streets every day by putting more thought and effort into it.

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda















































































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/photographer-captures-everyday-life-in-mozambique-here-are-his-best-shots/