Photographer Captures The Lives Of People Living In Yakutia, One Of The Coldest Regions In Russia

Winter can be quite painful and annoying to many people. At least to the ones living in the places of the world that have cold temperatures and piles of snow.

However, this region in Russia called Yakutia, also known as the Sakha Republic, tops it off with winters that get as cold as -50 degrees Celsius (-58 Fahrenheit). The region is located 5,300 kilometers from Moscow and has almost 1 million residents.

A Yakutian photographer named Aleksey Vasiliev decided to capture the daily lives and struggles of the Yakutian people, showing what living in such a cold region looks like and what people do to pass the time. The photographer told Bored Panda: “In the past, I was an alcoholic. When I stopped drinking, I needed to fill the void that the drink left. Then photography came to me and taught me to see life more positively.”

More: Aleksey Vasiliev, Instagram, Facebook h/t: boredpanda
































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/photographer-captures-the-lives-of-people-living-in-yakutia-one-of-the-coldest-regions-in-russia/

La-La Land: The Playful Side of Los Angeles in The 1970s and ’80s

Parade staging area, Los Angeles, 1980

American photographer Gary Krueger believes he lived through a ‘golden age’ in 1970s and 80s Los Angeles. A new exhibition pulls together his playful street photography.

Krueger’s curiosity and instincts helped to create a remarkable body of street photography that he describes as ‘split-second juxtapositions in life.’

After graduating high school in 1963, Krueger drove out west to study graphic design and photography at LA’s Chouinard Art Institute from 1964 to 1967. On graduation from Chouinard, Krueger was hired by Walt Disney as a graphic designer. While continuing his association with the Disney Corporation, he pursued photography full-time and had a successful commercial and editorial career as a freelance photographer for the company.

“I shoot only in a horizontal format with a 35mm lens – much like the way we see things in real life. Everything is shot at eye level and they’re all horizontal. I just said to myself, that’s what I’m going to do. None of the photos have been cropped, manipulated, composited or altered. The people pictured in the photos were not contrived, posed or directed.”

h/t: guardian

Rose Parade, Waverly Drive, 1980

Park in Los Angeles, 1975

Air show, 1978

Flying majorette, 1977

Shopping centre, 1978

Los Angeles Zoo, 1972

Cheerleader competition, 1980

Shopping centre, 1980

Woman behind pole, 1979

Mannequin in car, 1975

Swap meet (flea market), 1972

Easter parade, 1977

Girl at a dog show, 1979

Dream girl at a parade staging area, 1978

LA Christmas parade, 1976

Halloween party, 1980

Halloween party, 1977

Hollywood Christmas parade staging area, 1976

Graumann’s Chinese theatre, 1978

Somewhere in LA, 1974

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/la-la-land-the-playful-side-of-los-angeles-in-the-1970s-and-80s/

Life in the Past Through Stunning Color Photos Captured by Fred Herzog

Reader spruce, 1959.

Fred Herzog was born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1930. Losing both his parents during and after the war, he immigrated to Canada in 1952 and settled in Vancouver the following year.

Herzog studied photography magazines while working for the CPR steamship line and later was employed as a medical photographer. By day he earned his living at UBC, on evenings and in his spare time he walked through Vancouver with his camera, observed and documented the daily life and soul of the city.

h/t: vintag.es

My room, Harwood Street, 1958.

Throughout his career, Herzog produced a considerable amount of colour photographs, focusing on urban life, storefronts, second-hand shops, neon signs, billboards, vacant lots, cafes and crowds of people who have populated the streets over the years. Herzog’s use of colour was unusual in the ‘50s and ‘60s, a time when fine art photography was particularly associated with black-and-white imagery.

Two men in fog, 1958.

Furthermore, Herzog was known to photograph almost solely with Kodachrome slide film, which was very much difficult to print. It was not until the mid-seventies that printing technology eventually caught up, allowing him to make archival pigment prints that matched the colour and intensity of the Kodachrome film.

Family, 1958.

U R Next, 1959.

Magazine man, 1959.

Girl on steps, 1959.

Howe and Nelson, 1960.

Girl with handbag, 1960.

Boy with box camera, 1960.

Coca Cola & 7 Up, 1960.

Carnival, 1960.

Granville Street, 1960.

Newspaper readers, 1961.

Jackpot, 1961.

Hastings & Seymour, 1961.

Red stockings, 1961.

Satellite Radio, 1961.

San Francisco, 1962.

Chinatown, San Francisco, 1962.

Bookshop main, 1963

The muleteer, 1963.

Guatemala, 1964.

Commerical hotel, 1966.

Empty barber shop, 1966.

New World Confectionary, 1967.

Lucy, Georgia, 1968.

Arcade, 1968.

Airshow, 1968.

Mom’s shoes, 1969.

Curtains, 1972.

Orange cars Powell, 1973.

Lady in red, 1975.

Pink door, Kansas City, 1979.

Crossing Powell 2, 1984.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/life-in-the-past-through-stunning-color-photos-captured-by-fred-herzog/

Chilean Artist Finds Humor In Everyday Life, Here Are His Superb Minimalist Comics

Short and humorous comics are a quick and easy way to take your mind off of day-to-day reality. Chilean cartoonist Karlo Ferdon is spot-on in this category with his simple and minimalist comics that can bring a smile to your face. In his imaginative world, Ferdon draws people, animals, everyday objects, or foods caught up in random and witty situations.

By using little to no words in his comics, Ferdon offers a fresh and creative look at the world around us and creates ridiculous and fun jokes and puns that are unexpected, yet make perfect sense. Feet cracking up over a stand-up feather, the real appearance of the unfortunate pinky toe that has seen some stuff, iron-mum getting mad at a wrinkly iron-child, a remote playing hide and seek with a TV, and many more creative ideas below!

More: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter h/t: boredpanda

























































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/chilean-artist-finds-humor-in-everyday-life-here-are-his-superb-minimalist-comics/

Fascinating Nostalgic Color Photos Show What the World Looked Like in the 1950s

A 1950s Ford with a ‘Welcome to Colorful Colorado’

The 1950s were a decade marked by the post-World War II boom, the dawn of the Cold War and the Civil Rights movement in the United States. “America at this moment,” said the former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in 1945, “stands at the summit of the world.”

During the 1950s, it was easy to see what Churchill meant. The United States was the world’s strongest military power. Its economy was booming, and the fruits of this prosperity–new cars, suburban houses and other consumer goods–were available to more people than ever before.

A set of fascinating color photos from the Flickr user TresBohemes that shows what life around the world looked like in the 1950s.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

An old man walks up stairs in a small Belgian town

Back in the day when you traveled slow enough to see animals along the way

Camels in the desert

Cherokee street scene

Classic cars line up in the desert at this rest stop

Covered bridge near Johnson City, Tennessee

Driving through the redwood tree, Oregon

Harvesting of sugar beets in Germany

Holland residential street with canal

In his wooden shoes, this little boy in Holland stops to lay in the sand

Kingston, Jamaica street scene

Main street in USA

Malibu Beach Colony

Paris and the Eiffel Tower

Pit stop for cars and buses

Quebec City Saint Louis Gate

Salton Sea Beach sign

Salton Sea Beach, California

Scene from Holland showing Dutch milk seller and woman on bike

Skalkaho Highway, Montana

The famous Cliff House, San Francisco, California

Two young men getting their gear ready for a camping trip next to their station wagon

Yosemite Glacier Park

Young woman is tossed in the air on a large fur from an old

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/fascinating-nostalgic-color-photos-show-what-the-world-looked-like-in-the-1950s/

Trying to Understand the Mysterious Russian Soul with Amazing Photographs of Sergey Kolyaskin

Daily moments of life on photographs of Sergey Kolyaskin – master who has his own school of photography, who had fifteen personal exhibitions and published two photo albums, participated in numerous contests, being a member of the Creative Union of Artists of Russia and the Russian Geographical Society.

More: Sergey Kolyaskin, Instagram, Facebook, VK







































































































































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/trying-to-understand-the-mysterious-russian-soul-with-amazing-photographs-of-sergey-kolyaskin/

The America We Lost: Fascinating Found Photos Show How Life of the U.S Looked Like in the 1960s

Florida gulf, 1962

The 1960s were a decade of revolution and change in politics, music and society around the world. It started in the United States and the United Kingdom, and spread to continental Europe and other parts of the globe.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

Chula Vista gift shop, Branson, Missouri, 1962

The 1960s were an era of protest. In the civil rights movement blacks and whites protested against the unfair treatment of races. Towards the end of the decade more and more Americans protested against the war in Vietnam. Many people in the United States thought that Americans had no reason to fight in war that was so far away from home.

House and car, DeLand, Florida, 1962

Female activists demanded more rights for women, whose role in society began to change. The birth control pill and other contraceptives were introduced, making it possible for women to plan their careers and have babies when they wanted them.

Loc-Wood boat dock, Bagnell Dam, Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, 1962

After World War II people all over the world started working hard and respecting the values they were brought up with. Especially in Europe, it was an era of recovery and rebuilding. In the 1960s many young people started doubting such values. They protested against society and everything that was mainstream. They had hair long and wore unusual and strange clothes.

These fascinating photos were found by Dean Avants that shows how life of the United States looked like in the 1960s.

Times Square, NYC, 1963

Boy with “JUST MARRIED” car, Virginia, 1964

Two girls hurrying to a 1957 Ford Fairline convertible, 1964

Two ladies outside a camping trailer, circa 1964

42nd street, NYC, 1966

Chicago skyline from Civic Center, Illinois, 1966

Demonstration in Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Dinosaur Land, Vernal, Utah, 1966

Dodge City, Kansas, 1966

Entrance to America the Beautiful in Circarama, Disneyland, 1966

Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Johnson Wax Headquarters, Racine, Wisconsin, 1966

Lady reading pamphlet on street, Boston, Massachusetts, 1966

Laurent House, Illinois, 1966

Radio City Music Hall, NYC, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Students on field trip, somewhere in Oklahoma, 1966

Times Square, NYC, 1966

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1966

“It’s a Small World” ride, Disneyland, 1967

Girls on the beach, California, 1967

Tombstone, Arizona, 1967

White Sands, New Mexico, 1967

1968 Ford Mustang in driveway at NW 47th and Villa, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1968

Cycle race, Daytona Speedway, Florida, 1968

Girl at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Golf game in the mountains, 1968

Small group of friends at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Photo shoot, Maryland, 1969

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/the-america-we-lost-fascinating-found-photos-show-how-life-of-the-u-s-looked-like-in-the-1960s/

Incredible Black and White Photos Capture Street Scenes of NYC in the 1950s

However, after peaking in population in 1950, the city began to feel the effects of white flight to the suburbs, a downturn in industry and commerce as businesses left for places where it was cheaper and easier to operate, an increase in crime, and an upturn in its welfare burden, all of which reached a nadir in the city’s fiscal crisis of the 1970s, when it barely avoided defaulting on its obligations and declaring bankruptcy.

Have you ever wondered what life used to be like in New York? These black and white photos were found by EspressoBuzz that give you a glimpse into the life of New Yorkers in the 1950s.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

















































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/incredible-black-and-white-photos-capture-street-scenes-of-nyc-in-the-1950s/

Rare Hand-Colored Photographs of Japan on The Brink of Modernity in 1870s

Street minstrel, Gose.

Here’re a few rare photographs from the 1870s taken by Shinichi Suzuki (1835-1918) who photographed Japan for a foreign newsmagazine called The Far East.

After his lumber family business was destroyed by a tsunami in 1854, Suzuki traveled to Yokohama where he became an established photographer. Many of his photographs were hand-colored, which is why they appear more realistic and modern than the black and white photos of that era.

By the time of the photographer’s death in 1918, Japan had changed drastically, its society, politics, and economy were on par with the Western world. The traditional Japanese lifestyle that Suzuki Shin’ichi had captured in these photographs was being rapidly replaced by Western standards and values.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Professional singers.

Newsman.

Tea house waitress.

Tea house waitress.

Woman in traditional garment with sword.

A Japanese woman.

Farm laborer with rain coat.

A group of Japanese women.

An unknown Japanese woman.

Osaki Kioto dancer.

Man preparing a fish.

Housekeeper.

An unknown Japanese woman.

Florist.

Woman with parasol.

Two Japanese Men in Traditional Dress, 1870s.

Japanese woman in traditional dress posing outdoors.

Japanese woman in traditional dress posing with a child on her back.

Buddha Sculpture, 1870s.


Actor in samurai armor.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/rare-hand-colored-photographs-of-japan-on-the-brink-of-modernity-in-1870s/

50 Obsolete Things To Prove How Much The World Has Moved On And Changed

Blank VHS Covers Had Some Wild Artwork

There are two things that keep my spirits up when everything seems to be going wrong—daydreaming and nostalgia. If you’ve got the blues, there’s nothing like cuddling under a warm blanket, grabbing a mug of hot tea and some childhood snacks, and thinking back to the good old days. (Preferably with an old movie, game, or soundtrack to help you get in the right mood.)

If you’re a nostalgiaholic who loves reminiscing about how things used to be and what we used to have, then the ‘Nostalgia’ subreddit will be right up your alley. A community of nearly 868k people, r/nostalgia is a place for everything—from things to commercials from our past, whether they’re happy, funny, or sad. Get ready to dive headfirst into your childhood. Just remember to upvote your fave pics while you’re swimming through long-forgotten memories.

h/t: boredpanda

Entertainment Cabinets, The Click Sound It Would Make After Closing

Therapist and British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) member Kemi Omijeh explained to Bored Panda that how we remember our childhood experiences directly correlates to the kind of childhood we’ve had. In other words (and to generalize a bit), we’re nostalgic about our childhood if our experiences are full of being loved and nurtured. Meanwhile, the opposite is also true.

“If we’ve had a difficult childhood, it can be hard to feel nostalgic, instead it will feel like something we need to get over in order to move on,” said Omijeh.

According to her, nostalgia, aka our brains reliving the fun and happy times we’ve had, is good and healthy. “Nostalgia can also be a good coping strategy for times of low mood and challenges,” she said. However, Omijeh points out that there’s a limit: nostalgia can become a hindrance to everyday life when it interferes with our everyday lives and our ability to be present.

Who Remembers Looking Through The Card Catalog To Find A Book?

“Many psychologists, myself included, believe our childhood is the foundation to who we are as adults. It explains why we frequently revisit our childhood as it influences our present,” she explained.

Legends Of Pbs

“If we end up comparing it to our experiences today and feeling like nothing is as good as it was, then this will inevitably affect our mood and our ability to do what we need to do,” therapist Omijeh said. “We can become stuck in our nostalgia; in which case it might be best to seek help from a counseling professional to help you process your past in order to enjoy your present. You can find a counseling professional through the BACP.”

Another nuance is that when we’re living our past memories, we’re seeing them through a filter. The details might not be accurate and we’re reliving what we want to remember.

Considering that some of us (ahem, yours truly) can get stuck on daydreaming quite a bit, we were curious to find out what can be done to control it and feel more ‘present,’ instead of always floating about in fairyland.

Elementary School Paper

“Identify your patterns. Think about the times you usually daydream, is there something about that situation or those times that mean you’re daydreaming? Do something about it if that is the case. Set a time limit, use a timer if it ensures you stop,” BACP member Omijeh said. “Write down the biggest thought or feeling as a result of the daydream. That way you’re not just stopping daydreaming. You are doing something positive as a nice transition from stopping daydreaming to doing something.”

Remade My Room From The 90s In A 3D-Software, As I Remembered It

She also suggests interrupting daydreams by reminding ourselves of action points and to-do lists. Even something like singing or humming your favorite song can work wonders to distract you. Not a fan of music? Try reciting a poem or remembering your math skills by doing the times table. In other words, do something, anything to distract yourself from your daydreaming if you feel that it occupies too much of your time.

“Finally, turn your daydream into a visualization or goal exercise. Your daydreams could be a communication about your innermost desires. Could you begin to plan how to achieve those desires?” the therapist mused.

Visiting Home And Mom Busts Out My Sheets From 1986

Seeing how the r/nostalgia subreddit was formed back in 2008, in a very meta way, it won’t be long before someone’s nostalgic for its founding days as well.

90’s Movie Theaters

Whether or not nostalgia is good or bad for you is a complex question, as we’ve seen. But, in short, it’s all about balance. On the one hand, living just in your memories draws you away from the present, making you blind to your surroundings and the important events happening around you. We should be happy with where we are in the present, not just the past.

And, well, if we’re not too content with where we are in life, it’s best to make some honest changes so we have some great memories to look forward to in the future. But nostalgia has some great upsides, too, and plenty of researchers and therapists agree.

Viennetta, The Ice Cream That I Knew My Family Couldn’t Afford

On the other hand, being nostalgic can have benefits as well. It’s no secret that the way we think and what we think about affects our daily lives. Similarly, Scientific American confirms that the bittersweet nostalgic feelings we get actually improve our mood, our vitality, and possibly even our mental health.

That’s because nostalgia boosts something known as ‘self-continuity’ which is how connected we feel to our past selves and the narrative we have about our lives. So it really does pay off to reminisce about the brightest parts of your life, full of loved ones, warmth, and wholesome activities. Just remember not to get stuck there for too long, Pandas—it’s time to make new heartwarming memories.

CD Wallets… I Know They’re Still Around, But 90s Nostalgia

Actor Jonathan Hyde, A Staple Of Fun 90s Movies (Pictured: Richie Rich, Jumanji, Titanic, And The Mummy)

Sweater My Grandma Sewed For Me In The Early 90s

Fisher Price Farm

I Truly Miss Rental Stores

Anyone Else Want To Bring Back Kitchen Phones With The 10 Ft Cord?

Anyone Remember Seeing Wishbone?

I Miss This Cartoon Network

Somehow, This McDonald’s Floor Was Always Sticky And Slippery At The Same Time

The Tupperware Lemonade Jug That Was In Everyone’s Fridge

Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993)

Wooden Playground: Despite Scorching Hot Metal Slides And Rubber Bridges – We Always Went Back For More…

Getting Your Feet Measured Whenever You Got New School Shoes

My Collection Of Old Electronics That I Cannot Throw Out

The Blanket That Was Set Over Every Grandma’s Couch

Big Wood Grain Console TVs

Checking The New Release Section In Blockbuster

Bazooka Joe Gum

Ancient Cup From Pizza Hut. Nostalgic Enough?

Anyone Still Remember Wacky Races?

The Toxic Smell And Taste Of Plastic Balloons

90s High School Science Classroom

Christmas Life Savers Book

Paper Plate Holders

School Maps Over The Whiteboard

Anyone Played Aladdin?

“Zip Off” Shorts

Who Remembers Tiny Sized Chiclets?

Flintstones Vitamins

McDonald’s Ash Tray

A Piece Of Childhood That Meant Warm And Fuzzy Memories: Gracie Films Logo

Sand-Filled, Glittery, Rainbow Lizards

Having To Watch The Price Is Right When You Stayed Home Sick From School

The Dining Room Table & Chairs That Everyone Seemed To Have

Bubblicious Watermelon Bubble Gum

Does Anyone Remember The Pagemaster?

The Golden Age Of Cartoon Network (1998-2005)

Going To The Mall In The 80s And Having A Wall Of Cassettes To Choose From

Throwback To The Times When You Could Happily Spend Hours Just Moving Piles Of Sand From One Place To Another

Land Before Time! Pizza Hut Toys! In The 80s And Early 90s.. Pizza Hut Did Cool Stuff

LEGO Ghost From The 90s. Glows In The Dark!

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/50-obsolete-things-to-prove-how-much-the-world-has-moved-on-and-changed/