Sin Eater: Illustrations from The Heart of The Herefordshire Countryside by Matthew Glover

Matthew Glover is the creator of Sin Eater Illustrations, he lives deep in the heart of Herefordshire’s countryside. Here his fascination of nature and British folklore grew, working in a traditional pen and ink style his artwork is highly detailed and is all created by hand.

Detached from the contemporary, Matthew’s work is a call into the echoing chasms of the past. He has worked with bands to create album artwork worldwide and shown his art in numerous galleries. Alongside this body of work he focuses on reproducing his drawings for screen prints, letter press and even applies the decals onto handmade tableware.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/sin-eater-illustrations-from-the-heart-of-the-herefordshire-countryside-by-matthew-glover/

Medieval Artists Were Really Bad At Drawing Lions

While medieval artists excelled at painting religious scenes and portraits of royalty, lions offered an altogether different challenge. It looks like the medieval painters never laid eyes on a real lion.

h/t: sadanduseless

If you enjoyed this medieval weirdness, you will also like our previous posts from this era: Knights Fighting Giant Snails, Medieval Rabbits Murdering People, and Medieval People Enjoy Being Slaughtered.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/medieval-artists-were-really-bad-at-drawing-lions/

Codpiece Was a Weird Renaissance Fashion Trend

The codpiece as a feature of male dress dates to the 15th and 16th centuries during the renaissance. Designed to cover the gap between the two legs of men’s hose, it is packed and shaped to emphasize rather than disguise the genital area.

h/t: sadanduseless

The origins of the codpiece lie in the triangle of fabric used to join the two separate hose legs in the late 15th century when doublets shortened. Soon padding was added and ended up as the codpiece–a prominent, suggestive shape filling the gap between the legs of the breeches.

It soon became a normal part of male clothing, in style across many countless and social levels until the end of the 1500s. Tailors became as creative with codpiece shapes as with other clothing details. The codpiece could hide a pocket or even be used as a pincushion.

With great size comes great decorative responsibility, and men of means rose to the occasion. They brocaded, damasked, bejewelled, embroidered, tasseled, tinseled, and otherwise ornamented their codpieces until they became like walking Christmas trees. Puberty was no prerequisite: boys as young as seven could engorge themselves with silk and satin.

Codpiece even found its way to warfare: suit of the king’s armor, boasting a bulbous codpiece weighing more than two and a half pounds, is still on display at the Tower.


By the close of the sixteenth century, the codpiece had become a canker-blossom on the male form, and it declined as suddenly as it had ascended.

If you enjoyed this educational post, you should will also take a look at violent rabbits depicted in medieval manuscripts and badly painted babies in renaissance art.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/codpiece-was-a-weird-renaissance-fashion-trend/

Grotesque Medieval Music Sheets From Chansonnier of Zeghere van Male from 1542

The 16th-century scribes of Bruges had a lot of fun illuminating this musical manuscript, because it’s full of gorgeous, fascinating and downright bizarre illustrations. The song book is called the Cambrai Chansonnier and was made for the pleasure of aristocratic local Zeghere van Male.

h/t: vintag.es

The songbook of Zeghere van Male consists of four complementary part-books: Superius, Altus, Tenor, and Bass. The chansonnier became part of this public collection after the French Revolution, beforehand it was in the Bibliothèque de Saint-Sépulcre, also in Cambrai.

The book contains 229 compositions, extremely varied, some of them present only in this source. The special aspect of this manuscript is its marriage of music, art and culture: drawings adorn each folio. Executed by quill and with lively colors the drawings describe realistic scenes of daily life, leisurely activities, and include animals and monstrous creatures, obscene depictions and vegetal decorations. With mixed elements inherited from the Middle-Ages, the Antiquity and the vogue of the grotesque, they are a testimony of the prevailing taste in Flemish civil society in the first half of the 16th century.

Zeghere van Male (1504–1601) was a Bruges merchant dealing in linen, yarns and dyes. Also a politician, writer and cultured member of the well-to-do bourgeoisie, he is credited with not only preserving an extensive music repertory—13 masses, 2 mass fragments, 64 motets, 125 French secular pieces, 9 Flemish secular pieces, 3 Italian secular pieces, 12 textless pieces by the best composers of the time—but providing an extraordinary backdrop of illustrations, 1200 in all, together with vivid initials, foliage and grotesque characters, that depict all aspects of 16th-c. life: processions, funerals, ceremonial settings, scenes reminiscent of Hieronymus Bosch.

It is interesting to note that Zeghere achieved this feat not via some sort of monumental print (music publishing by 1542 was well established) but in a sumptuously hand-made manuscript, the only way to fully take advantage of the painterly and pictorial arts. The material in this wonderful book is invaluable for musicians, folklorists and art lovers.















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/grotesque-medieval-music-sheets-from-chansonnier-of-zeghere-van-male-from-1542/

Medieval Visions of Hell, Satan, Demons And Cabbalistic Signs From A 1775 Compendium Of Horrors

These are Visions of Hell, Satan and Demons according to the Compendium rarissimum totius Artis Magicae sistematisatae per celeberrimos Artis hujus Magistros, 1775 – (translation: “A rare summary of the entire Magical Art by the most famous Masters of this Art.”) “In German and Latin. On white, brown and grey-green paper. The title within an ornamental border in wash, with skulls...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/11/medieval-visions-of-hell-satan-demons-and-cabbalistic-signs-from-a-1775-compendium-of-horrors/

Wilhelm Werner Von Zimmer’s “Dance Of Death” From 1540

In the Late Middle Ages, there were illustrated books called Danse Macabre or the Dance of Death which were used to focus the mind on life’s short stretch. These books were heavily illustrated with pictures of Death or a gnarly skeleton fresh from the grave a-coming-up to claim both high and low. The peasant and the King were equal before Death, neither could escape its cold bony grasp.

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/08/wilhelm-werner-von-zimmers-dance-of-death-from-1540/

Why So Many Medieval Manuscripts Depict Butt Trumpets?

Knights fighting giant snails, rabbits murdering people, countless paintings of cats licking their butts, weird elephants …and now men and animals playing trumpets with their rear ends… Medieval art is really confusing and quite random. If you have any idea why artists were so obsessed with these themes, please leave a comment below.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/06/why-so-many-medieval-manuscripts-depict-butt-trumpets/

How Medieval Artists Saw Elephants: Claws, Hooves, Trunks Like Trumpets, And Castles On Their Backs

Imagine a four-legged beast with no knee joints that cannot lie down and has to sleep leaning against a tree. An animal with a long, skinny trumpet for a nose. A creature large enough that one can build small castles on its back. It lives for 300 years and is afraid of mice. Its mortal enemy is the dragon. It must “travel to the East, near Paradise, where the mandrake grows” when it comes time to...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/04/how-medieval-artists-saw-elephants-claws-hooves-trunks-like-trumpets-and-castles-on-their-backs/

Sleeping With The Devil: A Weird And Wonderful Collection Of Medieval Bedroom Hijinks With Creatures From Hell

The Conception of Merlin – Histoire de Merlin, France (Poitiers), 1450-1455. BNF, Français 96, fol. 62v The Middle English Prose Merlin at Cambridge University Library MS Ff.3.11, apparently written near the middle of the fifteenth century, not long before Thomas Malory was composing Morte D’Arthur, is thought the earliest piece of Arthurian literature written in English prose.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/03/sleeping-with-the-devil-a-weird-and-wonderful-collection-of-medieval-bedroom-hijinks-with-creatures-from-hell/

Why So Many Medieval Manuscripts Depict Violent Rabbits?

Medieval art sure is weird. We’ve already featured People Happily Dying, Battle Snails and Cats Licking Their Butts galleries. For some strange reason medieval artists also loved painting violent rabbits on a murderous rampage. If you have any idea why, please leave a comment below.

Source

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/12/why-so-many-medieval-manuscripts-depict-violent-rabbits/