Lovely Rainy Day Photos That Look Like Oil Paintings

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Eduard Gordeev’s cityscape scenes distinctly capture the moody ambiance of dark skies and rain-soaked streets. The St. Petersburg-based photographer often features widely recognized Russian landmarks viewed through windowpanes as raindrops streak down the glass. As the rain smears colors and diffuses light, the photos nearly take on the quality of impressionist oil paintings.














h/t: mymodernmet

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/2sglfTeP8Q0/

German Church Celebrates “Star Wars” At A Sunday Service

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A boy dressed as the Star Wars character Darth Vader attends a Star Wars themed church service, at the Zion Church in Berlin, Sunday, December 20, 2015. About 500 people, some carrying light saber props or wearing Darth Vader masks, attended the service, more than twice as many as usual on a Sunday. (Photo by Markus Schreiber/AP Photo)

A person, center top, dressed as the “Star Wars Jawa” character attends a Star Wars themed church service, at the Zion Church in Berlin, Sunday, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Markus Schreiber/AP Photo)

Vicars Lucas Ludewig, left, and Ulrike Garve, right, celebrate a Star Wars themed church service, at the Zion Church in Berlin, Sunday, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Markus Schreiber/AP Photo)

People dressed as characters from the movie Star Wars attend a service at the church Zionskirche in Berlin, Germany, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

A person dressed as a character from the movie Star Wars attends a service at the church Zionskirche in Berlin, Germany, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

A boy dressed as a character from the movie Star Wars attends a service at the church Zionskirche in Berlin, Germany, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

A person dressed as a character from the movie Star Wars attends a service at the church Zionskirche in Berlin, Germany, December 20, 2015. (Photo by Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/QAcs2gOZptI/

Edge of the Ledge. Photo by Stian N



Edge of the Ledge. Photo by Stian N

SOURCE: http://earthlynation.tumblr.com/post/135785525058

A Photographer Is Using A Unique Method To Show The Shift From Day To Night Across Famous Cities In Spectacular Images

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Daniel Marker-Moore ‘s take on time-lapse photography – which he calls time slice – sees the photographer snap image after image, before combining them to create beautiful, vibrant works. His images usually focus on a point in the day with the most dramatic change in light, such as sunrise or sunset. Marker-Moors, from Los Angeles, begins by shooting hundreds and sometimes thousands of images from the same spot.


Los Angeles – 65 photographs, 30 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Tokyo Tower: 65 photographs, 4 hours. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Hollywood: 11 photographs, 1 hour 15 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


New York: 70 photographs, 2 hours, 10 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Chicago: 35 photographs, 15 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Los Angeles: 55 photographs, 1 hour 10 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Moon Rise La Part 2: 40 photographs, 1 hour. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


New York: 38 photographs, 2 hours, 3 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Hong Kong: 57 photographs, 1 hour 40 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Shanghai: 64 photographs, 1 hour 20 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Shanghai: 65 photographs, 1 hour 53 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Toronto: 40 photographs, 1 hour 53 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Los Angeles: 72 photographs, 1 hour 58 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)


Hong Kong: 150 photographs, 56 minutes. (Photo by Daniel Marker-Moore/Caters News)

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/OeAazB2Uev0/

Photo Of The Day: End Of The Year

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A child looks at window cleaners work while dressed in sheep and monkey costumes, denoting animal signs of the Chinese zodiac calendar, during an event marking the upcoming end of the year at a hotel in Tokyo, Japan, December 21, 2015.

According to the zodiac calendar, 2015 is the year of the sheep and 2016 is the year of the monkey. (Photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters)

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/mLD5DxezHpE/

10 Photos Of Carrie Fisher Promoting “Return Of The Jedi” At A Rolling Stone Magazine Beach Shoot, 1983

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Everyone over a certain age in 1983, and many millions born later, cannot help but remember that bikini — the metal one worn by Carrie Fisher as a captive of Jabba the Hutt in Return of the Jedi, the one unfortunately named the “Slave Leia” costume.

Now it looks like Disney and Lucasfilm may be doing their best to retire the skimpy outfit, if a report on the well-sourced rumor website Making Star Wars is to be believed.

“Slave Leia costume is being retired from the Star Wars IP for merchandise and marketing,” the site’s editor in chief Jason Ward says he has been told by several sources inside the Mouse House.

That doesn’t mean that the costume won’t continue to exist at Star Wars fan conventions, and other nerd gatherings such as Comic-Con, where it remains among the most reliably popular costumes (and is often seen worn by men as well as women).

Return of the Jedi costume designer Aggie Guerard Rodgers told me the bikini was a deliberate throwback to Dejah Thoris, the eponymous heroine of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Princess of Mars, as envisioned by artist Frank Frazetta in the 1960s; it has roots in science fiction history and Art Deco design.

But even in the world of fandom, there are changes afoot when it comes to the name of the outfit and the figurine. After all, the primary function of Fisher’s character in that part of the narrative is to kill Jabba the Hutt, so focusing on the captivity part gives short shrift to her achievements — as Fisher herself has pointed out.






h/t: mashable, reddit

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/ynxRVTjvr84/

Spencer Tunick’s Awe-Striking Installations of Nude Crowds (NSFW)

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Spencer Tunick is an American photographer who has traveled the globe taking stunning photographs of nude crowds. Amassed and synchronized in large groups, the volunteers pose in diverse (and sometimes challenging) environments, such as public spaces in Monaco, botanical gardens in Mexico, and impressively, the Swiss glacier of Aletsch.

Defying logic with a creative and seemingly simple concept, Tunick’s work demonstrates the power and presence of the crowd, exploring the body as a signifier for community, expression, and dissent. Due to various arrests and legal battles trying to take photographs in New York City, Tunick has not shot there in over ten years, but continues to create his art abroad.








h/t: scene360

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/_uSjKrgmU1I/

Dad Transforms His Adorable 4-Month-Old Son Into A Real-Life Elf On The Shelf

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Photographer Alan Lawrence is now creatively celebrating the holidays with his 4-month-old son Rockwell. Instead of buying his kids an Elf on the Shelf, the dad instead went in a different direction: he made Rockwell the elf.

“We have never had an Elf on the Shelf in our home but the idea has always intrigued me. Parents letting elves in their homes to watch their kids and cause mischief,” Lawrence explained to BuzzFeed.

“Then one day someone told us that Rockwell looked like an elf and the idea came to me. What if a real life elf came to live with us for the holidays and how would I react in real life to having it show up to live with us?”

Lawrence soon had an answer to his question because Rockwell was transformed into an absolutely adorable elf. In his bright red costume (complete with a pointy hat), the little boy can be seen playfully causing mischief all over the house, each of his high jinks caught in a sweet series of photos. Beneath each image, Lawrence writes a story that adds to the fun nature of this project, which he hopes to continue every day until Christmas.

“We love sharing our family’s story,” says Lawrence. “I just feel blessed to be a dad and want the world to know how fun it can be when you don’t take life so serious.”







h/t: mymodernmet, buzzfeed, themighty

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/DEvrDgkE4v8/

Timeless New York Street Scenes Photographs In The 1950s, Found In A Home’s Attic After Nearly 50 Years

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These vintage photographs capture a timeless energy and diversity that is characteristic of the sleepless streets of New York City. The recently discovered antique portraits showcase the city in the midst of the 1950’s, as seen through the Rolleiflex lens of the undiscovered photographer Frank Larson. While digging through his aunt’s attic, where Larson stowed away his images in 1964, the photographer’s grandson found this remarkable collection of street scenes that give a candid glimpse into the history of the big city.

In the 1950’s, Larson worked as an auditor in Queens and had a great knack for capturing beautiful moments in everyday life. Known as the “family shutterbug,” photography was a creative outlet that provided relief from the stresses of his 9 to 5 banking job. On the weekends, he would leave home early in the morning on expeditions to explore the city and photograph the life he saw, from Chinatown to Central Park. Throughout his lifetime, his talent was hardly recognized other than at a few local amateur competitions. After Larson passed away, due to a stroke, his images laid dormant, lost for nearly 50 years. Now having resurfaced, Larson’s extensive collection of thousands of black and white pieces are in the care of the Queens Museum of Art and are receiving the recognition they deserve.

Three young ladies prepare to have their pictures taken in Manhattan photo booths in April 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A rainy day across from St. Patrick’s Cathedral.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A rainy evening in New York’s Times Square under the neon lights of the “Black Widow” marquee.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A group of businessmen huddle together at the window of the Associated Press office at Rockefeller Center to read the latest news, 1955.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

The Chrysler Building is reflected in a sidewalk puddle on 42nd St. in April 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Two men chat in a coffee shop window near Times Square in April 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A Ballantine beer truck stops to make a delivery in front of the NBC Television Theatre.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A street performer promotes the film “Johnny Guitar” on the sidewalks of Times Square in Spring, 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A woman suns herself outside the entrance to the New York Public Library in 1955.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A group poses for a picture at Pier 86, on 46th Street.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Professional skaters make a gutsy move in this shot, taken at the Rockefeller Center rink.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Two parade officials watch New York’s Saint Patrick’s Day parade pass by on Fifth Avenue as one of them sneaks a cigarette break.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

The view from the top of a Rockefeller Center escalator looks out onto Fifth Avenue.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A candid moment of school girls in 1953.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Cops, delivery men, construction workers, cooks, cobblers and kids, just going about their business.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A man works on New York City souvenirs with his sewing machine in November 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A woman peers out from a ticket booth of a movie theater in New York’s Times Square in 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Pigeons gather in Times Square on a rainy day in 1954.


Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art. h/t: vintag.es, mymodernmet, today

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/5gagPeI-ZyE/

This is What Photographers Look Like When You Take Away the Camera

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Ever wonder what you look like while you’re taking pictures? Orlando, Florida-based photographer Rich Johnson wants to show you. For his latest project “Behind the Mask,” Johnson had photographers pose for two pictures, one with their camera, and one without.


Photo © by Rich Johnson

“As a photographer I sometimes look at my camera as a shield,” Johnson says. “For me, it makes it easier to insert myself in situations, and somehow feel completely disconnected from the moment. It’s as if I am wearing a mask and no one can see me.”, told Rich to PetaPixel.


Photo © by Rich Johnson

Johnson first asked each photographer to take their camera and pretend they were taking a picture of him. After shooting a portrait of them, Johnson had his assistant quickly take the camera out of the subject’s hands, and Johnson immediately snapped a second photo.


Photo © by Rich Johnson

“From time-to-time, I would catch myself making faces behind the camera, and wondered if all photographers did this.”


Photo © by Rich Johnson

“It was really interesting to see the results of this project,” Johnson says. “Some were totally comfortable with it, and others weren’t. Some people did it in one take, and some had to do it over again because once we took their camera away they lost their composure.”


Photo © by Rich Johnson

“The most difficult part of this shoot was getting the real faces they actually make while taking photographs,” says Johnson. “Photographers demand a lot from their subjects, but once you flip the camera on them, they have the same emotions and conflicts the rest of the world has.”


Photo © by Rich Johnson


Photo © by Rich Johnson. h/t: petapixel

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/KbcSx5JiDnQ/