Humorous Comic Fat Lady Postcards by Donald McGill From the Early 20th Century

Donald McGill (January 28, 1875 – October 13, 1962) was an English graphic artist whose name has become synonymous with the genre of saucy postcards, particularly associated with the seaside (though they were sold throughout the UK).

The cards mostly feature an array of attractive young women, fat old ladies, drunken middle-aged men, honeymoon couples and vicars. He has been called “the king of the saucy postcard,” and his work is collected and appreciated for his artistic skill, its power of social observation and earthy sense of humor. Even at the height of his fame he only earned three guineas a design, but today his original artwork can fetch thousands of pounds.

h/t: vintag.es

McGill spent virtually the whole of his career creating the distinctive color-washed drawings which were then reproduced as postcards. He ranked his output according to their vulgarity as mild, medium and strong, with strong being much the best sellers. His family, however, was steadfastly respectable. He said of his two daughters, “They ran like stags whenever they passed a comic postcard shop.”

During the First World War he produced anti-German propaganda in the form of humorous postcards. They reflected on the war from the opinion, as he saw it, of the men serving, and the realities facing their families at home. Cards dealing with the so-called “home front” covered issues such as rationing, home service, war profiteers, spy scares and interned aliens. Recruitment and “slackers” were other topics covered.

In 1941, author George Orwell wrote an essay on McGill’s work entitled “The Art of Donald McGill”. Orwell concluded that in spite of the vulgarity and the low artistic merits of the cards, he would be sorry to see them go.

Approaching 80, McGill fell foul of several local censorship committees, which culminated in a major trial in Lincoln on July 15, 1954 for breaking the Obscene Publications Act 1857. He was found guilty and fined £50 with £25 costs. The wider result was a devastating blow to the saucy postcard industry; many postcards were destroyed as a result, and retailers cancelled orders. Several of the smaller companies were made bankrupt, as they had traded on very small margins.

In the late 1950s, the level of censorship eased off and the market recovered. In 1957, McGill gave evidence before a House of Commons select committee set up to amend the 1857 Act.
























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/humorous-comic-fat-lady-postcards-by-donald-mcgill-from-the-early-20th-century/

Funny Vintage Postcards Depict People Falling From Donkeys in Le Plessis-Robinson, France, ca. 1900

Le Plessis-Robinson is a commune in the southwestern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 10.5 km (6.5 mi) from the center of Paris. It was first mentioned in 839 as Plessiacus apud Castanetum, meaning plessis near Castanetum. A plessis was a village surrounded by a fence made of branches.

h/t: vintag.es

In 1112 the village church was founded, of which the romanesque tower still survives as the oldest monument of Le Plessis. At the end of the 12th the village was renamed Le Plessis-Raoul, after the local lord Raoul, chamberlain of king Philip II of France. In 1407 it came into the hands of Jean Piquet de La Haye, who built a castle in the village, now called Le Plessis-Piquet. In 1614 a monastery of the Congregation of the Feuillants was built in the village.

In 1682 Jean-Baptiste Colbert, Minister of Finances under Louis XIV had a pond dug which fed the fountains of the nearby Château de Sceaux. Pierre de Montesquiou d’Artagnan purchased the estate in 1699, and expanded the gardens. In 1790, as a result of the French Revolution, Antoine Moullé was elected the first mayor of Le Plessis.

The commune was renamed Le Plessis-Liberté. The monastery was nationalized and demolished. The commune was renamed back to Le Plessis-Piquet in 1801. In 1848, a guinguette (cabaret) was established in the area as a suite of interconnected tree houses. It was named Le grand Robinson after the tree house described in Swiss Family Robinson, a novel itself named after Robinson Crusoe. Several other popular establishments arose in the area, and remained popular until the 1960s.

In 1909, the commune of Le Plessis-Piquet was officially renamed Le Plessis-Robinson, after Le grand Robinson. In 1854, Louis Hachette bought the castle and the grounds. He later became the mayor of Le Plessis-Piquet and a city councillor. The village and the castle were ruined in the War of 1870, but the castle was rebuilt by the Hachette family.












SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/funny-vintage-postcards-depict-people-falling-from-donkeys-in-le-plessis-robinson-france-ca-1900/

The Futuristic World as Envisioned by Echte Wagner Advertising Cards, 1930

These future fantasy collectible cards were published by the German company Echte Wagner in the first half of the 20th century. Originally Echte Wagner made margarine, and it made a lot of trade cards that were distributed all over Central Europe. In 1930, the True Wagner Margarine created a series of books designed as a display for a collection of stickers made available separately. In this book, there’s a section called Future Fantasy which has no artist or author credited.

The illustrations are beautiful, the technology is actually quite brilliant and not so far-fetched. The book is called Echte Wagner Margarine Album Nr. 3, Serien 12 und 13 (Genuine Wagner Margarine Album Nr. 3″, series 12 and 13). It was published by Elmshorn in Holstein, Germany.

Wireless Private Phone and Television

“Each person has their own transmitter and receiver and can communicate with friends and relatives using certain wavelengths. But television technology has become so advanced that people can talk and watch their friends in real-time. The transmitter and receiver are no longer bound to the location but are carried in a box the size of a photo apparatus.”

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Monorails

“To increase the speed of traffic, there’s a single-lane expressway. The cars are designed to minimize air resistance. To ensure that the train does derail, which would be a disaster at 500 km, it is supported by stabilization surfaces.”

The Artificial Island

“Since there is no island located on the shortest route to America which could serve as a port, it’s a good idea to create an artificial landing place on the ocean. Of course, there are hotels, spas, restaurants, and a movie theater, so the passengers can enjoy their trip if there is a storm delaying the flight.”

The Rocket Plane

“The aircraft of the future is powered by rockets. The rockets are fitted at the stern of the vessel, which propels the aircraft forward through the recoil of the escaping gases. The aircraft shown here is cruising toward Nankoupas and the ancient Great Wall Of China with 10,000 kilograms of mail. Since it has a speed of 1,000 km per hour, it takes less than 8 hours for the Berlin-Tokyo route. A steamer today needs about 50 days!”

The Rocket Airships

“The rocket planes are in huge proportions and they are shaped like a parabola. The lavishly furnished cabins are built into the wings and hold almost 400 passengers. Because there is no fuselage, the control fins are located at the ends of the wings. The driver’s cab, from which the rockets are managed, is located in the middle of the deck.”

New Highways

“The horses are gone and electricity has replaced the steam power. The pedestrians are no longer in danger from traffic because the motorways and sidewalks are strictly separated. All men and women wear uniform clothing: zipped suits and pants.”

An airship ready to land

“The airship displayed above is about to land in its giant pad. It is no longer lifted by gas and driven by engines, it has a built-in transformer that is able to harness gravity into repulsive force. Now it’s possible to raise, lower, and move huge payloads.”

A New Driving Force (Nuclear-Powered Cars)

“The future cars are powered by tiny engines that use nuclear power. The speed of cars has grown accordingly. The reach speed of 200 to 300 kilometers an hour on city roads. On highways, speeds of 1,000 km/h are quite common!”

An Oceanic Steamer

“The shape of the steamer has changed and the bulky constructions have disappeared, not even a chimney can be seen. The ship shown here carries 20,000 passengers in two days from Hamburg to New York.”

Landing Of A Spaceship On The Moon

“Is this depiction wrong? Shouldn’t the rockets ignite at the stern of the vessel and spew their fire back? No, it’s correct! The ship is landing, it has deployed the brake rockets and has quickly reduced its speed. Now you can easily make the landing on the Moon.”

Private Aircraft With Nuclear Propulsion

“Here we have the opportunity to see a plane. But, where is the propeller? That is none! The aircraft rises and comes down vertically. The engine is a small capsule, in which the nuclear reaction takes place. On the right side, you can see the airplane’s garage.”

Spaceship Port

“Because there are rare minerals on the Moon, America has built a $20 billion enterprise named MoMA-A.G. (Moon Minerals A.G.). At this dock station, the ships can renew their rocket fuel. The station floats freely in the space.”

Cars powered by nuclear power

Getting ready to launch a rocket to the Moon

A rocket among the stars

A rocket flying toward Sun and Mercury

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/the-futuristic-world-as-envisioned-by-echte-wagner-advertising-cards-1930/

Stunning Real Photo Postcards Captured Street Scenes at Night in the 1960s

Hamilton St., Regina Saskatchewan

Production of postcards blossomed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. As an easy and quick way for individuals to communicate, they became extremely popular.

A real photo postcard (RPPC) is a continuous-tone photographic image printed on postcard stock. The term recognizes a distinction between the real photo process and the lithographic or offset printing processes employed in the manufacture of most postcard images.

h/t: vintag.es

Fairbanks, Alaska

Real photo postcards may or may not have a white border, or a divided back, or other features of postcards, depending on the paper the photographer used.

Central Ave., Albaquerque NM

The last and current postcard era, which began about 1939, is the “chrome” era, a shortened version of Photochrom. However these types of cards did not begin to dominate until about 1950 (partially due to war shortages during WWII).

Variety Park, Hereford TX

The images on these cards are generally based on colored photographs, and are readily identified by the glossy appearance given by the paper’s coating. These still photographs made the invisible visible, the unnoticed noticed, the complex simple and the simple complex. The power of the still photograph forms symbolic structures and make the image a reality.

Dundas St., London ON

Guerrero Ave., Nuevo Laredo, Mexico

North Virginia St., Reno NV

Granby St., Norfolk, VA

Times Square, NY

State St., Chicago IL

Looking North from Robson St., Vancouver BC

Chinatown at Night, Chicago IL

Barnard Ave., Vernon BC

Main St., Moncton NB

Market St., San Francisco CA

Main St., Buffalo NY

Rush St., Chicago IL

Sunset & Vine, Hollywood CA

West State St., Rockford IL

Yonge St., Toronto ON

Broadway, Portland OR

William Street, Sydney

Rue Principale, Chibougamau, Quebec

State Street, Chicago, Illinois

Night Scene, Missoula, Montana

St. Catherine St., Montreal QC

Chinatown at Night, Vancouver BC

East Second St., The Dalles, Oregon

Main St., Welland, Ontario

Minnesota Ave, Kansas City

Main St., Estevan, Saskatchewan

Night Scene, Moscow, Idaho

Spokane, Washington

St. Catherine St., Montreal QC

Summit St., Toledo OH

San Antonio St., El Paso, Texas

Main St., Quesnel, BC

Granville St., Vancouver BC

King Street, Chatham, Ontario

Klamath Falls, Oregon

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/stunning-real-photo-postcards-captured-street-scenes-at-night-in-the-1960s/

Street Scenes of the U.S. From the 1960s Through 30 Wonderful Color Real Photo Postcards

Wenatchee, Washington

Postcards are always of great historical and social interest. In 1903 Kodak introduced the No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodak. The camera, designed for postcard-size film, allowed the general public to take photographs and have them printed on postcard backs, usually in the same dimensions as standard vintage postcards. Many other cameras were used, some of which used glass photographic plates that produced images that had to be cropped in order to fit the postcard format.

In 1907, Kodak introduced a service called “real photo postcards,” which enabled customers to make a postcard from any picture they took.

While Kodak was the major promoter of photo postcard production, the company used the term “real photo” less frequently than photographers and others in the marketplace from 1903 to ca. 1930.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

Bennettsville, South Carolina

Miles City, Montana

Yuma, Arizona

Livingston, Montana

Redding, California

Carson City, Nevada

Scottsdale, Arizona

Bellingham, Washington

Everett, Washington

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

Sandpoint, Idaho

Lewiston, Idaho

Central City, Colorado

Elgin, Illinois

Madras, Oregon

Williston, North Dakota

Santa Monica, California

West Palm Beach, Florida

Filmore, Utah

Kingsport, Tennessee

Blaine, Washington

Fairhope, Alabama

Anchorage, Alaska

Port Angeles, Washington

Roseburg, Oregon

Everett, Washington

Eugene, Oregon

Indio, California

Seal Beach, California

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/street-scenes-of-the-u-s-from-the-1960s-through-30-wonderful-color-real-photo-postcards/

A Collection of Fabulous Potato-Themed Real Photo Postcards From the Early 20th Century

The Square America Archive WARNING: if you are a PL (Potato Lover), some of these photos might be too hot to handle! h/t: vintag.es The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America Archive The Square America...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/a-collection-of-fabulous-potato-themed-real-photo-postcards-from-the-early-20th-century/

Photographer John Hinde And His Fabulous Colourful Postcards From The Past

The photographer Martin Parr once described the postcards of John Hinde as “some of the strongest images of Britain in the 1960s and 1970s”. Parr noted that Hinde was: “fastidious about the colour, the saturation, the technique, and that paid off.

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/12/photographer-john-hinde-and-his-fabulous-colourful-postcards-from-the-past/

Dressed Cats: Postcards From The 1950’s By Artist Eugen Hartung Published By Alfred Mainzer, Inc.

From the 1940s through the 1960s, the Alfred Mainzer Company of Long Island City, NY published a series of linen and photochrome humorous cat postcards illustrated by Eugen Hartung (or Hurtong) (1897–1973), sometimes referred to as “Mainzer Cats”. These postcards normally illustrate settings that are filled with action, often with a minor disaster just about to occur. While the dressed cats were...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/11/dressed-cats-postcards-from-the-1950s-by-artist-eugen-hartung-published-by-alfred-mainzer-inc/

Beautiful Postcards Capture Everyday Life Of American Indians In The Early 20th Century

Old Carreta, Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico, circa 1901 The collection is comprised of postcard views of Navaho, Hopi and Pueblo Indians; pueblos; interiors of Hopi houses; ceremonials; and blanket weaving. Views of American Indians, Blackfoot, Apache, Hopi and Pueblo are prints of paintings, some by Winold Reiss for the Great Northern Railway, W.E. Rollins and Fred Harvey. h/t: vintag.es An Up-stairs...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/09/beautiful-postcards-capture-everyday-life-of-american-indians-in-the-early-20th-century/

Romantic French Postcards From The Early 20th Century

Taking erotic pictures and then sending them to your partner seems like something people have always managed to do. In the late 19th century and the early 20th though, taking photographs was not that easy, and exchanging “French Postcards” was that time’s sexting. h/t: art-sheep, mashable Most of these postcards were made in France, hence the informal “French Postcards,” and they were a lucrative...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2019/08/romantic-french-postcards-from-the-early-20th-century/