The ’80s Hairdos: One of the Sexiest Hairstyles of All Time

Hairstyles in the 1980s included the mullet, tall mohawk hairstyles, jheri curls, flattops, and hi-top fades, which became popular styles.

h/t: vintag.es

Amongst women, large hair-dos, puffed-up styles, permanent waves, and softer cuts typified the decade. Big hair that was “often permed to achieve the desired volume” is especially associated with women of the mid 1980s as well as male rockstars of that era, especially of the glam metal genre.

Television shows such as Dynasty helped popularize the high volume bouffant and glamorous image associated with it.





































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/the-80s-hairdos-one-of-the-sexiest-hairstyles-of-all-time/

This Anesthesiologist Recreates Historical Clothes

History can be something to learn from, something to study, or just plain boring to some people. However, for some, it’s a source of inspiration and a way to unleash their creativity and style.

Dr. Christine Na-Eun Millar is a “historical costumer, board-certified doctor, gamer, mother, wife. Not always in that order,” as she describes herself in her Instagram bio. Christine creates amazing clothes, and especially gowns from the 1700s. She looks at inspiration from those times and creates her unique looks. She is an anesthesiologist by profession and has a beautiful child with her husband. Her family often appears in her photos also wearing historical clothing.

More: Instagram, Youtube h/t: boredpanda

Christine shared with Bored Panda: “So, I work full time as a doctor (MD) in a hospital, so after everything I see and deal with at work, I need an outlet to sort of focus my creativity and my energy. I found that of all the mediums, sewing relaxed me the most. There is something about working with a needle and thread and patiently putting things together, slowly, that helped take away the stress of work.”

“In particular, my favorite images growing up were historical gowns, princess gowns, and just overall pretty dresses. So I started to try to recreate them. I love taking a museum piece, like the green redingote from the Rijks Museum, and trying to figure out in my head how they sewed it together and how the original artist embroidered it.”

“For me, while I love sewing, I don’t enjoy hand embroidery. So I started doing the embroidery by machine. I draw out or ‘digitize’ the embroidery on a computer, designating exactly where I want each stitch to be, and in what order. After that, I send it to Foto to do Perfil de Sewstine, my embroidery machine, and have it stitch it out. It’s a lot of fun to see something you’ve made on a computer stitched out in silk.”

“As for how I pick which gown—oh, I couldn’t tell you what it is. I always have a list of about 50 gowns in my head that I want to make. At some point, a whim or a thought comes to me that it’s time to make that dress. For instance, just last night, I woke up in the middle of the night and I knew that I needed to work on a chemise a la Reine, so that will probably be my next project.”

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/this-anesthesiologist-recreates-historical-clothes/

The Original and Outrageous 1979 Cocaine Calendar

London’s IDEA Books have a rare 1979 cocaine calendar for sale.

The calendar was published in San Francisco (of course) by Red Dog Productions (no idea) in 1978 (duh) and is a relic from a time when cocaine use, while illegal, wasn’t considered all that bad. Seriously.

“What more could you ever want? Once seen – it must be bought and owned.”

In 1975, a DCDATF (Domestic Council Drug Abuse Task Force) report for President Gerald Ford stated that cocaine was ‘not physically addictive, and usually does not result in serious social consequences, such as crime, hospital emergency room admissions, or death.’ How wrong can you be?

The 1979 Cocaine Callendar is a rare item and one that deserves a more in-depth write-up, but, let’s face it, you’re not going to read any of this. You’ll just look at the pictures and wish it was you hoovering up rack with some classy people and listening to ‘Tusk’ by Fleetwood Mac.

More: IDEA h/t: monsterchildren










SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/the-original-and-outrageous-1979-cocaine-calendar/

When Retro RPG Lets You Name The Main Character…

His journey was long and hard with many ups and downs…

h/t: sadanduseless




















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/when-retro-rpg-lets-you-name-the-main-character/

Stunning Black and White Photos of Chicago in 1988

“A look at a man plunged into a rugged city in the diversity of his urbanism” is how the sociologist and historian Henri Peretz describes Chicago.

“Chicago’s urban landscape is very particular, changing at every turn, sometimes monumental and majestic, sometimes dark and lugubrious,” says Peretz. “The city is flat, the skyscrapers are visible from everywhere. In the loop, the metro is omnipresent because it is airy. The variety of habitat is also impressive. The contrast between the modern city center, the chic suburbs, and the poor neighborhoods was and remains striking.”

Taken by Gil Rigoulet, Chicago 1988 was commissioned by French daily newspaper Le Monde.

More: Gil Rigoulet h/t: vintag.es



































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/stunning-black-and-white-photos-of-chicago-in-1988/

“Desperate Dreams”: Awesome Retro-Styled Illustrations by Karolis Strautniekas

Karolis Strautniekas is a freelance illustrator best known for his eerie, nostalgic yet acutely contemporary illustrations. Based in Vilnius, Lithuania, he achieved international recognition; still, his illustrations have something special, a je-ne-sais-quoi which makes the world wonder if there’s maybe more to it than what we encounter at first sight.

More: Karolis Strautniekas, Instagram









































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/desperate-dreams-awesome-retro-styled-illustrations-by-karolis-strautniekas/

Playful Pictures of Marilyn Monroe Having Breakfast in Bed, 1953

Marilyn Monroe having breakfast in bed at the Bel Air hotel in Los Angeles, 1953. She was photographed by Andre de Dienes during the filming of How To Marry a Millionaire.

Andre de Dienes was the first photographer to photograph the young Norma Jeane in 1945 as a professional model. They were engaged in 1946 and he photographed her off and on through 1953.

h/t: vintag.es



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/marilyn-monroe-having-breakfast-in-bed-1953/

“Bikes, Broads, Beer, and Boogie”: The Great Collection of Biker Magazines from the 1980s

Easyriders magazine was the motorcycle magazines of the 1970s (with Iron Horse a distant second). Far from being just motorcycle enthusiast rag, it delivered the “biker lifestyle” on its pages.

As you might expect, there was plenty of material on Quaaludes, dirty sex, and stickin’ it to the pigs. By the end of the decade other contenders arose, not quite as embedded in biker counter-culture, but no less raunchy and lowbrow. As each cover of Outlaw Biker magazine proudly proclaims, it’s all about the: “Bikes, Broads, Beer, and Boogie”

Here is a look at the magazine covers from the dawning of the new decade. The first few years look very much like the 70s, but the biker mags eventually eased into the fresh new look of the 1980s. Let’s take it year by year. Enjoy.

Btw, don’t miss the collection of cool retro covers for ‘Overdrive Magazine: Voice Of The American Trucker In The 1970s.’

h/t: flashbak, retrospace



































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/bikes-broads-beer-and-boogie-the-great-collection-of-biker-magazines-from-the-1980s/

Fumetti: The Collection of Finest Examples of Sleazy Lowbrow Art the World Has Ever Known

Italian comics also known as fumetto, plural form fumetti. The most popular Italian comics have been translated into many languages. The term fumetto (literally little puff of smoke) refers to the distinctive word balloons that contain the dialog in comics (also called nuvoletta, “little cloud”, in Italian).

Sure, these grindhouse movie posters could get racy and over-the-top, but nothing compares to the fumetti in terms of jaw-dropping sleaze performed with artistic skill.

The adult fumetti from the 1970s-1980s are the true heirs to the classic American horror pulp covers of the 1930s-40s. Peruse a cover gallery of early pulps and you’ll find that same characteristic over-the-top, ultra-lurid, and uncomfortably misogynistic vibe. As we entered mid-century, things got tamer and censorship was enforced… but not in Europe where the adult fumetti kept the lowbrow horror illustration alive and well. The content is mildly disturbing (and often hilariously bizarre), but the artwork, for the most part, is pretty damn good. Enjoy!

h/t: retrospace

































































































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/fumetti-the-collection-of-finest-examples-of-sleazy-lowbrow-art-the-world-has-ever-known/

Weirdly Wonderful Vintage Balaclava Knitting Patterns From the 1960s and 1970s

Knitting and crocheting seem like fun hobbies, and some people are truly talented at creating funky handmade scarves, hats, sweaters, and so on. Yet like all things crafty, there’s always potential to let your sense of humor shine and create something that is a little less practical than it is hysterical. Case in point; remember these fabulously raunchy cross stitches?

h/t: vintag.es

The knitted and crocheted balaclavas here in this gallery are definitely not your average cable knit made with love by grandma, and the people who make these crazy pieces of knitwear clearly don’t take themselves too seriously! That’s kind of refreshing, isn’t it? So join the fun and have a laugh at some of the weirdest things to have ever happened to an innocent ball of yarn.

A balaclava, also known as a balaclava helmet or Bally (UK slang) or ski mask (US slang), is a form of cloth headgear designed to expose only part of the face, usually the eyes and mouth. Depending on style and how it is worn, only the eyes, mouth and nose, or just the front of the face are unprotected. Versions with a full face opening may be rolled into a hat to cover the crown of the head or folded down as a collar around the neck.

The name comes from their use at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War of 1854, referring to the town near Sevastopol in the Crimea, where British troops there wore knitted headgear to keep warm. Handmade balaclavas were sent over to the British troops to help protect them from the bitter cold weather. British troops required this aid, as their own supplies (warm clothing, weatherproof quarters, and food) never arrived in time. According to Richard Rutt in his History of Handknitting, the name “balaclava helmet” was not used during the war but appears much later, in 1881.










SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/weirdly-wonderful-vintage-balaclava-knitting-patterns-from-the-1960s-and-1970s/