Amazing Rare Photographs of The Romanovs’ Final Ball In Color, St Petersburg, Russia 1903

The last emperor of Russia Nicolas II dressed in the golden brocade of 17th-century Russian tsar Alexey Mikhailovich, standng with Empress Alexandra Fedorovna. All the jewellery was chosen by court jeweller Carl Faberge.

These portrait photographs of Russia’s ruling Romanovs were taken in 1903 at the Winter Palace in majestic. St. Petersburg. Knowing what was to follow, the venue was apposite.

Czar Nicholas II and his 390 guests partied for 2 days. Day one (February 11) saw dancing, music and food. With the guests loosened up and rested, day 2 (Feb 15th) featured a masked ball. There was a surfeit of sexual excess, debauchery and entitlement for a family whose absolutist rule was hailed by the country’s grateful serfs – they dubbed the Czar ‘Little Father’ – and supported by a complicit church which declared Romanov blood sacred.

In 1918, Bolshevik officials executed the ex-Emperor and his family.

These color images were created by Olga Shirnina, whose colorized photographs of Russian history and Soviet female snipers in WW2 bring the past to life.

h/t: flashbak

Princess Olga Orlova in Masquerade Costume for the Ball

Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia, 1903

Alexandra Feodorovna, Costume Ball 1903

Zinaida Yusupova

La Comtesse Karlow, nee Vonlarsky (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

La Comtesse Fersen, nee Princesse Dolgorouky (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

La Comtesse Orlow-Davydow, nee Zographo (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

Cornette Kolioubakine

Mademoiselle Dorothee Bibikow, 1903

La Comtesse Keller, née Princesse Schakhovskoy (Femme de boyard)

Mademoiselle Alexandrine Taneiew

La Princesse Elisabeth Obolensky, Demoiselle d’honneur de Sa Ma

La Comtesse Elisabeth Moussine-Pouchkine, née Comtesse Capnist (Femme de boyard du XVII siècle)

La Princesse Youssoupow

Anna Taneeva (Vyrubova) with sister

S.A.S. la Princesse Galitzine, née Comtesse Moussine-Pou


S.A.S. le Prince Dmitri Galitzine, Chef de la Venerie Imperial

Madame Bezobrazow, nee Comtesse Stenbock-Fermor (Femme de boyard)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/amazing-rare-photographs-of-the-romanovs-final-ball-in-color-st-petersburg-russia-1903/

Inspired by Space 1999, a Miniature Volkswagen Space Transporter

Alvis Pi, a Space 1999 fan, created this model, the Volkswagen Space Transporter, mixing an Eagle with a Volkswagen van, the end result is fantastic.

It was built from a VW Hasegawa kit, plastic pipes, ladders, handrails and plastic sheet, and the engines are from a 1/144 Revell Saturn V kit. The crew is a 1/24 scale, has two pods, one for passenger transport and a Hydro pod that carries a piece of a satellite and a rare plant. Very good job.

Space: 1999 is a science-fiction television programme that ran for two series from 1975 to 1977. In the opening episode, set in the year 1999, nuclear waste stored on the Moon’s far side explodes, knocking the Moon out of orbit and sending it, as well as the 311 inhabitants of Moonbase Alpha, hurtling uncontrollably into space.

h/t: tumblr, messynessychic









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/inspired-by-space-1999-a-miniature-volkswagen-space-transporter/

Before the Photoshop Era, Here Are What Manipulated Photos Looked Like in the Early 20th Century

“Pumpkins grown in Iowa soil are profitable”

Photo manipulation dates back to some of the earliest photographs captured on glass and tin plates during the 19th century. The practice began not long after the creation of the first photograph (1825) by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce who developed heliography and made the first photographic print from a photoengraved printing plate.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

When we go after something in Colorado, we got it”

Traditional photographic prints can be altered using various methods and techniques that involve manipulation directly to the print, such as retouching with ink, paint, airbrushing, or scratching Polaroids during developing (Polaroid art).

So what did manipulated photos look like in the early 20th century? Just check out these fascinating photos from Rick Soloway to see.

“Zeppelin flying over Cosmopolitan Studios, N.Y. 1927” is noted on back

A New Farm Hand

An Early Bi-Plane in Flight

Bobby Leach and his barrel

County Fair Corn Contest

Garden City, Iowa

Hauling Pineapples, Honolulu

Lobsters and Lady

Man Eating Bass

May the Best Man Win

Rocky Mountain Rack Jabbit

The Train Hold-Up

Two Wise Old Birds

West Texas Jackrabbit

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/before-the-photoshop-era-here-are-what-manipulated-photos-looked-like-in-the-early-20th-century/

The America We Lost: Fascinating Found Photos Show How Life of the U.S Looked Like in the 1960s

Florida gulf, 1962

The 1960s were a decade of revolution and change in politics, music and society around the world. It started in the United States and the United Kingdom, and spread to continental Europe and other parts of the globe.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

Chula Vista gift shop, Branson, Missouri, 1962

The 1960s were an era of protest. In the civil rights movement blacks and whites protested against the unfair treatment of races. Towards the end of the decade more and more Americans protested against the war in Vietnam. Many people in the United States thought that Americans had no reason to fight in war that was so far away from home.

House and car, DeLand, Florida, 1962

Female activists demanded more rights for women, whose role in society began to change. The birth control pill and other contraceptives were introduced, making it possible for women to plan their careers and have babies when they wanted them.

Loc-Wood boat dock, Bagnell Dam, Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, 1962

After World War II people all over the world started working hard and respecting the values they were brought up with. Especially in Europe, it was an era of recovery and rebuilding. In the 1960s many young people started doubting such values. They protested against society and everything that was mainstream. They had hair long and wore unusual and strange clothes.

These fascinating photos were found by Dean Avants that shows how life of the United States looked like in the 1960s.

Times Square, NYC, 1963

Boy with “JUST MARRIED” car, Virginia, 1964

Two girls hurrying to a 1957 Ford Fairline convertible, 1964

Two ladies outside a camping trailer, circa 1964

42nd street, NYC, 1966

Chicago skyline from Civic Center, Illinois, 1966

Demonstration in Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Dinosaur Land, Vernal, Utah, 1966

Dodge City, Kansas, 1966

Entrance to America the Beautiful in Circarama, Disneyland, 1966

Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Johnson Wax Headquarters, Racine, Wisconsin, 1966

Lady reading pamphlet on street, Boston, Massachusetts, 1966

Laurent House, Illinois, 1966

Radio City Music Hall, NYC, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Students on field trip, somewhere in Oklahoma, 1966

Times Square, NYC, 1966

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1966

“It’s a Small World” ride, Disneyland, 1967

Girls on the beach, California, 1967

Tombstone, Arizona, 1967

White Sands, New Mexico, 1967

1968 Ford Mustang in driveway at NW 47th and Villa, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1968

Cycle race, Daytona Speedway, Florida, 1968

Girl at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Golf game in the mountains, 1968

Small group of friends at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Photo shoot, Maryland, 1969

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/the-america-we-lost-fascinating-found-photos-show-how-life-of-the-u-s-looked-like-in-the-1960s/

The 1955 GMC L’Universelle Dream Truck

One of the most popular General Motors design concept models designed under the direction of Harley Earl was the 1955 GMC L’Universelle show van. The name “L’Universelle” is French and means “The Universal.” The model was a part of the Motorama shows during the 1950s, which created a huge buzz among crowds at the time.

h/t: vintag.es

In January of 1955, GM debuted its ’55 L’Universelle show van at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, at the opening of that year’s Motorama. Though not a conventional “dream car” as one would normally find at the Motorama, it nonetheless shared the same level of innovation as the one-offs displayed by the General’s other divisions. Moreover, the bronze-colored van shared many of the same Harley Earl-inspired design elements used on both production and non-production GM cars of the time.

The L’Universelle concept model was designed under the direction of Charles Jordan, a creative and talented automotive/truck designer. Jordan, who had worked in the GMC studio, became one of GM’s youngest and brightest designers, creating many successful projects during the 1950s. The L’Universelle project started out as a box design with the engine positioned up front followed by a big box interior design for the driver and cargo area. The interior was designed around the engine, which had allowed a certain separation of the cargo area from the driver’s cab area.

Jordan along with many other GM design team employees, created a monospace form with large chrome bumpers and a compact style. Some automotive historians have said that the L’ Universelle show model offered a strong character line wrapped around the front and continuing along the sides before curving down to the rear wheels. The model also offered a panoramic windshield design, which became very popular on many vehicles during the 1950s. The front-end design offered the same look that found on passenger vehicles. The show truck also offered twin side doors which could open in a gullwing design for the driver or passengers.

Another person that was a part of the L’Universelle project was Philip Monaghan, the vice president and general manager of the GMC division at the time, who said, “The basic design of the L’Universelle is a panel delivery; minor manufacturing changes can convert it into a small bus, taxi, station wagon, or sportsman’s car.”

Although the concept truck was unveiled at the Motorama show in 1955, it never saw production. However, the L’Universelle concept did influence other Chevrolet truck designs during the 1960s. For example, the first passenger compact van by Chevrolet, the Greenbriar Corvair model, used a lower interior space design for passenger comfort and safety that came from the L’ Universelle.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/the-1955-gmc-luniverselle-dream-truck/

The Mandalorian Season 2 Premiere Recreated As Classic Marvel Star Wars Comic

The Mandalorian’s season 2 premiere has received the classic Marvel Comics cover treatment in this new piece of fan art. It’s the krayt dragon battle that’s received special attention in this new piece from artist @dvglzv (previously). Din (with Baby Yoda in tow) is shown flying in the air above the krayt dragon as though the scene was in a classic comic book. The retro comic cover look is a fun way to view this scene, particularly because it looks like it could fit in perfectly with the rest of the Star Wars comic world.

Though there has only been one episode so far, The Mandalorian season 2 has been praised for its impressive visuals and classic Western story. Undoubtedly, there will be more surprises ahead, but fans are largely feeling good about the direction the season is going. The Mandalorian’s premiere also featured the return of a major Star Wars character, setting up some intriguing possibilities going forward. Perhaps future episodes will get their shot at becoming a Marvel Comics cover too.

More: Instagram h/t: screenrant







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/the-mandalorian-season-2-premiere-recreated-as-classic-marvel-star-wars-comic/

GCDS 2021 Calendar Viva L’Italia by Nadia Lee Cohen

Nadia Lee Cohen’s photographs and films, heavily inspired by Americana and Britain in the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s, are veritable visions of saturated, surreal dreamscapes. Drawing upon the duality of the female form, fine art photographer and filmmaker Lee Cohen locks our optics upon the twisted paradise that lurks within her mind.

She explores the paradoxical standoff between strength and fragility within womankind. Lee believes in living within her work, and has gained notoriety through her quirky colourful online presence on social media; in which she plays dress up and curates interesting imagery of her day to day inspirations. At just 22 years old Lee’s work initially gained recognition as a successful entry for the National Portrait Gallery’s prestigious Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize. In 2014 Procter & Gamble sponsored Lee to travel to America to shoot. This turned out to be the birth of her most successful personal series yet ‘100 Naked Women’, which she continues to develop between Los Angeles and London.

This year, all the calendar’s proceeds will be donated to MERMAIDS, a British charity that supports transgender, nonbinary and gender-diverse children and young people, as well as their families and professionals involved in their care.

More: Instagram, Shop









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/gcds-2021-calendar-viva-litalia-by-nadia-lee-cohen/

Incredible Black and White Photos Capture Street Scenes of NYC in the 1950s

However, after peaking in population in 1950, the city began to feel the effects of white flight to the suburbs, a downturn in industry and commerce as businesses left for places where it was cheaper and easier to operate, an increase in crime, and an upturn in its welfare burden, all of which reached a nadir in the city’s fiscal crisis of the 1970s, when it barely avoided defaulting on its obligations and declaring bankruptcy.

Have you ever wondered what life used to be like in New York? These black and white photos were found by EspressoBuzz that give you a glimpse into the life of New Yorkers in the 1950s.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

















































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/incredible-black-and-white-photos-capture-street-scenes-of-nyc-in-the-1950s/

Rare Hand-Colored Photographs of Japan on The Brink of Modernity in 1870s

Street minstrel, Gose.

Here’re a few rare photographs from the 1870s taken by Shinichi Suzuki (1835-1918) who photographed Japan for a foreign newsmagazine called The Far East.

After his lumber family business was destroyed by a tsunami in 1854, Suzuki traveled to Yokohama where he became an established photographer. Many of his photographs were hand-colored, which is why they appear more realistic and modern than the black and white photos of that era.

By the time of the photographer’s death in 1918, Japan had changed drastically, its society, politics, and economy were on par with the Western world. The traditional Japanese lifestyle that Suzuki Shin’ichi had captured in these photographs was being rapidly replaced by Western standards and values.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Professional singers.

Newsman.

Tea house waitress.

Tea house waitress.

Woman in traditional garment with sword.

A Japanese woman.

Farm laborer with rain coat.

A group of Japanese women.

An unknown Japanese woman.

Osaki Kioto dancer.

Man preparing a fish.

Housekeeper.

An unknown Japanese woman.

Florist.

Woman with parasol.

Two Japanese Men in Traditional Dress, 1870s.

Japanese woman in traditional dress posing outdoors.

Japanese woman in traditional dress posing with a child on her back.

Buddha Sculpture, 1870s.


Actor in samurai armor.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/rare-hand-colored-photographs-of-japan-on-the-brink-of-modernity-in-1870s/

Previous Generations Sure Knew a Thing or Two About Style

“My movie star looking grandparents sitting for a portrait in the early 1940s”

thechive

Do you ever get the feeling that people are not as stylish and glamorous today as they were in the past? Many of us had this thought pass through our minds when watching a period drama or even when looking through old family photos. It could be that people put more effort into their appearance back then, or it could be the fact that taking a picture was a much rarer occurrence than today, so everyone made sure they looked their best when it happened.

The photos below were shared online by people who just had to show the world how dashing their grandparents looked, and they are certainly right. We could definitely learn a thing or two from previous generations when it comes to style!

“My grandma at 19 years old, taken around 1950”

thechive

“My grandparents on their wedding day (1948). My nana is wearing a dress she already owned, my grandfather is wearing his uniform. He spent over 2 weeks’ wages to get those red roses during winter because they were all his bride wanted.”

thechive

“My grandmother looking like a real-life Disney princess, 1955”

thechive

“My grandparents on their wedding day, the 1950s”

thechive

“My grandma turns 100 years young today! This is her circa the 1950s.”

thechive

“My grandma holding my mom, 1958.”

thechive

“My grandmother in Venice in the 1960s.”

thechive

“My grandparents on their honeymoon, 1962.”

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“My grandmother in the 40s, in her nursing garb. Today is her 93rd birthday. Classy then, even classier now.”

thechive

“My grandpa around 1970 looking like he just solved one of Agatha Christie’s infamous cases.”

thechive

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2020/12/previous-generations-sure-knew-a-thing-or-two-about-style/