“Dark Carnival”: Photographer Makes a Shots of Vintage Creepy Clowns In a Cornfield

According to Tara Mapes: “If you know me, you know Halloween is my favorite time of year. Scratch the pumpkin spice and sweater weather, I just love recreating vintage horror shots.

Last year I created papier-mache masks and did some cool horror stuff (you can check out by clicking here)! I also did a shoot at an old abandoned asylum (you can check out the post by clicking here). And don’t forget the Dark Carnival that came to town earlier this year (you can find the post here)!

This year I went with CLOWNS AND CORN.

This weekend I’ll be shooting at an actual Horror House down the street, so stay tuned for the return of the DARK CARNIVAL.

Enjoy, my fellow fright freaks, enjoy!”

More: Tara Mapes, Facebook h/t: boredpanda






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/dark-carnival-photographer-makes-a-shots-of-vintage-creepy-clowns-in-a-cornfield/

“Art of The Doodler”: Fyodor Dostoevsky Draws In His Manuscripts

More than 200 sheets of Russian writer Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky’s notebooks and manuscripts contain drawings, among them mainly portraits, sketches of Gothic windows and arches, arabesques and calligrams.

Dostoevsky (11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881) did not make his doodles for public view. His graphics do not illustrate the corresponding novels but are pictorial notes that make a link or suggest a line of thought or character development, a form of non-verbal communication, essentially hermeneutic and surely impossible to fully interpret without asking the writer.

h/t: flashbak














SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/art-of-the-doodler-fyodor-dostoevsky-draws-in-his-manuscripts/

The Future Imagined in Albert Robida’s “La vie électrique,” 1890

Electricity.

Who participated in the first video date? A good couple for candidacy in this regard are Georges Lorris and Estelle Lacombe, who meet via “téléphonoscope” in Albert Robida’s 1890 novel Le Vingtième siècle: la vie électrique in which he imagines “the electric life” of the future.

h/t: publicdomainreview

The old world’s dishonesty.

Adding a visual component to two recent technologies, the telephone (1876) and the phonograph (1877), this device lets scattered families in the year 1956 reunite around a virtual dinner table. For the lovebirds Lorris and Lacombe, the téléphonoscope facilitates their unapproved liaison in an immunologically fraught world. (And, for those without a beau, it also offers a service akin to on-demand streaming.)

The Sahara desert made into agricultural land after a climate overhaul.

This proto Zoom/Netflix hybrid is just one of several prescient predictions in Robida’s novel. Frictionless trains shoot through tubes, anticipating the Hyperloop, and doorknockers have been replaced with a “recording phonograph with photographic lens”, allowing residents to both screen visitors and take messages in the event of their absence: a smart doorbell before its time.

The Lauterbrunnen lighthouse.

The tubes (view from an aeronef at 700 meters).

Taking in the evening air.

From exam to exam.

A grand selection of ancestors . . . whose influence will dominate?

The engagement voyage.

Floating dungeons.

The charge of the bicyclists.

Some models from the air fleet.

A torpedo ambush.

The examination for a doctorate in Military Science.

A busy neighbourhood.

The old and the new.

The physical decay of the overrefined.

Our rivers and atmosphere — the multiplication of various pathogens, microbes, and bacteria.

The sophisticated, poisonous chemistry.

The dream of M. Arséne des Marettes.

The miasmatic war.

A national park.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/the-future-imagined-in-albert-robidas-la-vie-electrique-1890/

Photos of Mark Frechette and Daria Halprin During the Filming of ‘Zabriskie Point’, 1970

Zabriskie Point is a 1970 American drama film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni and starring Mark Frechette, Daria Halprin, and Rod Taylor. It was widely noted at the time for its setting in the counterculture of the United States. Some of the film’s scenes were shot on location at Zabriskie Point in Death Valley.

h/t: vintag.es

The film was an overwhelming commercial failure, and was panned by most critics upon release. Its critical standing has increased, however, in the decades since. It has to some extent achieved cult status and is noted for its cinematography, use of music, and direction.

Following prolonged publicity and controversy in North America throughout its production, Zabriskie Point had its premiere at Walter Reade’s Coronet Theatre in New York City on February 5, 1970, almost four years after Antonioni began pre-production and over a year and a half after shooting began, before being generally released on February 9, 1970. Despite the explicit language and sexual content, the film received an R rating rather than an X, in a shift in the MPAA’s policy.


















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/photos-of-mark-frechette-and-daria-halprin-during-the-filming-of-zabriskie-point-1970/

Creative Fashion Designs by Kansai Yamamoto in the Early 1970s

Japanese designer Kansai Yamamoto (February 8, 1944 – July 21, 2020) was a fixture of the 1970s and ’80s fashion scene, and his avant-garde kimonos gained popularity thanks to one big-name fan: David Bowie.

h/t: vintag.es

Yamamoto’s floaty womenswear creations helped cement Bowie’s androgynous look during his Ziggy Stardust tour, and a long-term relationship was born. “Color is like the oxygen we are both breathing in the same space,” Kansai once said of his work with Bowie.

Kansai opened his first boutique in Tokyo in 1968 and eventually expanded worldwide. His collections debuted in the United States in 1971 at Hess’s in Allentown, Pennsylvania, a department store known for its controversial fashion shows of American and European styles selected for their potential to influence ready-to-wear clothing designs.

That same year Kansai became the first Japanese designer to show in London, where his clothing was seen by David Bowie; Bowie later commissioned Kansai to create the wardrobe for his Ziggy Stardust stage persona. The designer was again featured in Hess’s showing of Asian trendsetting fashions for fall/winter 1973 at One World Trade Center in New York. All of the Kansai ensembles on view in this gallery were modeled at the New York event; several were shown earlier in London.





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/creative-fashion-designs-by-kansai-yamamoto-in-the-early-1970s/

Space Colony Art from the 1970s

In the 1970s the Princeton physicist Gerard O’Neill, with the help of NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University, held a series of space colony summer studies which explored the possibilities of humans living in giant orbiting spaceships. Colonies housing about 10,000 people were designed and a number of artistic renderings of the concepts were made.

h/t: publicdomainreview









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/space-colony-art-from-the-1970s-2/

Beautiful Portraits of Highland Park High School Teenage Girls, 1947


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive

Highland Park High School is a public, co-educational high school located immediately north of downtown Dallas in University Park, Dallas County, Texas. It is a part of the Highland Park Independent School District, which serves residents who are predominantly college-educated professionals and business leaders in the Dallas community. It serves: all of the city of University Park, most of the town of Highland Park, and portions of Dallas.

h/t: vintag.es


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive

The first building was the yellow brick schoolhouse of the Armstrong School which opened on October 12, 1915. The Armstrong School only served children through ninth grade. In 1922, the high school moved to its own separate building on Normandy Avenue following HPISD’s purchase of 11 lots in 1920. The tenth grade was added in the fall of 1922, and the eleventh grade a year later.


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive

In 1924, 34 students became the first graduating class of the Highland Park Independent School District when they participated in the first-ever high school graduation ceremony of HPISD on June 2, 1924 (at that time, only eleven years of school were required prior to college admittance; it was not until 1937 that the twelfth grade was added).


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive

These black and white photos were taken by LIFE photographer Cornell Capa in 1947. They show beautiful teenage girls’ styles of Highland Park High School from between the mid to the late of 1940s.


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive


Cornell Capa/LIFE Photo Archive

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/beautiful-portraits-of-highland-park-high-school-teenage-girls-1947/

Beautiful Photos of Jane Birkin at Home Taken by Jean-Claude Deutsch in 1971

A native of London, Jane Birkin began her career as an actress, appearing in minor roles in Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blowup (1966), and Kaleidoscope (1966). In 1968, she met Serge Gainsbourg while co-starring with him in Slogan, which marked the beginning of a years-long working and personal relationship.

h/t: vintag.es

After separating from Gainsbourg in 1980, Birkin continued to work as both an actress and a singer, appearing in various independent films and recording numerous solo albums. In 1991, she appeared in the miniseries Red Fox, and in the American drama film A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries, in 1998. In 2016, she starred in the Academy Award-nominated short film La femme et le TGV, which she said would be her final film role.

Birkin has lived mainly in France since the 1970s. In addition to her acting and musical credits, she lent her name to the Hermès Birkin handbag.

These beautiful photos were taken by photographer Jean-Claude Deutschthat that show beautiful portraits of Jane Birkin at home in Paris on December 15, 1971.

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/beautiful-photos-of-jane-birkin-at-home-taken-by-jean-claude-deutsch-in-1971/

Joyful Illustrations of the Artist Who Misses Soviet Days

Pin-up themed illustrations of Natalia Ershova bring back sweet memories of the Soviet times. Reminds me amazing illustrations of Valery Barykin.

More: FL (russian only)





































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/joyful-illustrations-of-the-artist-who-misses-soviet-days/

These Colourised Photographs Show How People Took Shelter in The London Underground in The 1940s

According to Lottie Cutcher, a photo retouch magician: “My name is Lottie, and I love looking through old photos. For my day job I work in costume, so I’m passionate about social history and getting the colour accurately matched. I recently started colourising black and white photographs to bring out how the scene would have actually looked at the time the picture was taken. I think black and white photographs have a beautiful style of their own, but colourising them helps the pictures feel relevant and relatable today, and gives them more context in the real world.

I chose to colourise a series of photographs from the Blitz during World War Two. The original images are so interesting, and I find it surreal that people took shelter in all sorts of places whilst the war was happening around their homes. I hope that by doing this, I can reinforce that people over 75 years ago looked and felt just the same as we do today. Hope you enjoy them!”

More: Hindsight Colouring, Instagram h/t: boredpanda

The Blitz was an almost daily bombing raid during 1940/1941. During this time, Londoners were encouraged to take cover overnight in the tube stations and tunnels

Originally the Government had concerns that people would be too scared to leave the tube and would not surface to work towards the war effort. With many having nowhere else to go, they relented

Numbers averaged around 150,000 a night, however a total of 177,000 people spent the night underground on 27th September 1940

It was far from safe. Many people were killed from direct station hits. In March 1943, 173 people died in a crush at Bethnal Green station when a woman panicked and slipped on the stairs entering the station

Many felt safer sleeping with the noise of the bombing more muffled above them as they slept deeper down in the stations and tunnels

They look surprisingly snug!

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/these-colourised-photographs-show-how-people-took-shelter-in-the-london-underground-in-the-1940s/