“Art of The Doodler”: Fyodor Dostoevsky Draws In His Manuscripts

More than 200 sheets of Russian writer Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky’s notebooks and manuscripts contain drawings, among them mainly portraits, sketches of Gothic windows and arches, arabesques and calligrams.

Dostoevsky (11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881) did not make his doodles for public view. His graphics do not illustrate the corresponding novels but are pictorial notes that make a link or suggest a line of thought or character development, a form of non-verbal communication, essentially hermeneutic and surely impossible to fully interpret without asking the writer.

h/t: flashbak














SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/art-of-the-doodler-fyodor-dostoevsky-draws-in-his-manuscripts/

Photographer Captures the Decadence and Conflict of Russia’s Turbulent 2010s

A lot of photographers have tried to capture the peculiarities of Russia’s day-to-day life, but no-one does quite like Konstantin Tishshe. The Ural-based independent photographer documents the ambivalent reality of the 2010s and the unconventional beauty of coming of age in Russia’s outskirts. The teenagers he documents — idealist, quixotic and lost — are in constant search of connection, whether through a smartphone or at wild house parties.

He started his eponymous Tishshe almost a decade ago, when he turned to photography in an attempt to capture the decadence, idealism, resistance, and social conflict he encountered both in his hometown of Beryozovsky — a small industrial town close to the Ural city of Yekaterinburg — and across the country as a whole.

More: Instagram h/t: calvertjournal

Tishshe, the Russian word for “be quiet”, is an appropriately sarcastic response to the oppression that takes place in Russia.

“The concept of a foreign enemy, propagandised by the Russian authorities, is manifested in ubiquitous fences that turn the streets into prison corridors of some sort. Fences and gates are details of a bigger system, the inhabitable fear,” Tishshe comments.






































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/photographer-captures-the-decadence-and-conflict-of-russias-turbulent-2010s/

Outstanding Color Autochromes from Pre-Revolutionary Russia

These outstanding autochrome pictures of pre-Revolutionary Russia were taken by Peter Ivanovich Vedenisov (1866-1937), a graduate from the Moscow conservatory. He settled in to Yalta, working as a professional pianist, vice-chairman of the Yalta branch of the Russian musical society, founder of the Yalta religious-philosophical society and an avid meteorologist. But Vedenisov’s passion lay in photography.

h/t: flashbak

Among the images of people in tranquil settings before all hell broke loose are pictures of his wife, Vera, her mother, Elena Frantsevna Bazileva, and Andrey and Sofia Nikolaevna’s children, Vera, Natasha, Nick, Lisa and Tanya.

There’s something haunting about autochromes – natural colour images made without need for artificial colourising – their painterly quality, perhaps, give them a spiritual quality. It’s as if, the longer you look at them the more the subject comes to life.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/outstanding-color-autochromes-from-pre-revolutionary-russia/

Meet the Fashion Designer Whose Fantastical Creations Reimagine Folklore for Modern Times

A young Chuvash born artist Polina Osipova is already shaping up to be a huge finding for big couture houses and those who share a love for astonishing artworks. Thanks to her unique (and we mean it) vision, she was recently requested to work with Gucci. But there is more that we can be proud of. Her idea of limelight on folk motives makes our heart melt.

Polina Osipova’s signature design is a pearl and silk ribbon headpiece reminiscent of something from a Russian folk tale. Only, it’s adorned with two surveillance cameras. It was inspired by the female heroines of Russian fairy tales who frequently had powers to see beyond their physical location, but with a timely, witty take on pop culture and ubiquitous modern-day surveillance.

More: Instagram h/t: calvertjournal, l’officiel










































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/meet-the-fashion-designer-whose-fantastical-creations-reimagine-folklore-for-modern-times/

Edwardian London as Seen Through the Eyes of an Unknown Russian Tourist in 1909

London entered the 20th century at the height of its influence as the capital of the largest empire in history, but the new century was to bring many challenges. London was the largest city in the world from about 1825 until it was overtaken by New York City in 1925.

h/t: vintag.es

The years between Queen Victoria’s death in 1901 and the start of the First World War in 1914 were years of growth and general prosperity, though the extreme inequalities which had characterized Victorian London continued. By 1900 one out of five Britons lived in London, with the population of roughly 5 million in 1900 rising to over 7 million by 1911.

These 20 amazing photographs below show street scenes of London at the turn of the 20th century. They were taken by an unknown Russian tourist in 1909.

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/edwardian-london-as-seen-through-the-eyes-of-an-unknown-russian-tourist-in-1909/

“Leotaurus”: The Epic Example of the Classic Russian Tyre Art

The author of the sculpture is Valeriy Kudrin from the Krasnodarskiy region of Russia. According to him, the only instruments he used were a knife, an axe, a welding machine, an angle grinder and a screwdriver. “It’s not a problem to get old tyres – they are given for free by any car service center” – says Valeriy.

h/t: englishrussia



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/leotaurus-the-epic-example-of-the-classic-russian-tyre-art/

Russian Artist Creates Impressive And Atmospheric Paintings

According to Daria Pochinskaya, a Russia based artist: “I am a self-taught artist. In my artworks, I combine classical figurative painting and abstract, impressive manner of landscape art.

The main character of my paintings are not idealistic, mystical figures at the epicenter of the storm or floating in an impenetrable fog. They are depicted not as powerless before the elements but as part of their power.

In my works, I explore the nature of the depth and power of human emotions. My paintings are a journey, an attempt to capture the gusts of raging winds, which are as sensual and fickle as the human spirit. This is a quickly passing, barely perceptible intimate moment where a person and an element are one. A moment in anticipation of something growing and inevitable.

The atmosphere of my work is often like a dream or a memory. It is a paradox, a unity of strength, storm, and peace.”

More: Instagram



























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/russian-artist-creates-impressive-and-atmospheric-paintings/

“Russian Nowhere”: Russian Aesthetics in Postconceptualist Artworks of Pavel Otdelnov

Pavel Otdelnov’s projects focus on urban locations that attract little to no attention — most people, if they happen to go there, try to leave as soon as possible. This might be former industrial sites that have lost some of their function or been repurposed entirely, parking garages, warehouses — all such places are located on the outskirts of the city and mark its abrupt termination, a cliff with nothing but an endless landscape over its edge.

More: Pavel Otdelnov, Instagram, Facebook

In the Russian Nowhere series, the artist continues to actively engage with text: he transforms snippets of text found online into light installations, reminiscent of a corner store sign, and then incorporates these quotations into real-life landscapes through photography. The resulting effect is defamiliarisation.

Pavel Otdelnov is aware that direct replication of reality is impossible, so he uses different optics — machine vision and collective human intelligence. This typifies his work as postconceptualism. Turning to landscapes that are no longer utilised or populated, the artist reaffirms their existence and proposes to give them a negative definition. These places exist but their description or identification, even supported by an accurate image, is not possible. This “nowhere” is actually everywhere, emerging from the void, which is, in fact, the main character in Otdelnov’s work.

In Russian Nowhere, Pavel Otdelnov has aptly captured this recently emergent phenomenon in the collective sensibility of dealing with the loss of the future as a human project. A person is not a personal project anymore, the person has now denounced the myths, which used to hold power over us, of being the architects of our own futures. The initiative now lies with non-human actors: the natural entropy that prevails and erases from the face of the earth the remains of grand social utopias, the onslaught of new deadly viruses brought about by the environmental disaster, the menacing self-animation of technology.

“One early morning I happened to stay around a large train station. I might be waiting for the subway to open, or be waiting for a departure — I cannot quite recall. It was freezing cold outside, dark and drab, so I decided to kill the time in a station café. I got myself a dixie-cup tea and went on to look for a place to seat. Everything was occupied by other people waiting or napping, large luggage, and I had to land near two men of different ages who were engaged in a lively conversation. Apparently, they just met right there and then, and had already fixed something to tank up. Both were, most likely, making a transit connection. As I joined their table, there was a protracted silence that seemed to drag on forever. The conversation could not continue given my presence, and a new subject was in order. Then the older guy looked around the table and said: “So we are all going to part ways now. You’ll head your way, I’ll go to (he mumbled an unknown destination). This one (he pointed at me) goes someplace else.”The stranger looked around the table once again and held a pause. ‘Wherever, everywhere it’s the same sh*t all over!..'” he writes.




















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/russian-nowhere-russian-aesthetics-in-postconceptualist-artworks-of-pavel-otdelnov/

Rare and Beautiful Soviet Murals Unexpectedly Found Behind Commercial Booths

An interesting story happened in Ryazan recently – authorities removed booths from the subway, and look what was found behind the commercial premises. These mosaics and murals had been forgotten for dozens of years.

h/t: englishrussia





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/rare-and-beautiful-soviet-murals-unexpectedly-found-behind-commercial-booths/

How You Live In Russia When You Supervise Local Road Police

We were never invited to this house because its owner, Head of Road Police in the Stavropol region of Russia, probably didn’t wish the public to see how he lives. But just recently he has been detained on suspicion of corruption and crime of professional misconduct. Now the photos of his house are widely covered by the Russian media.

h/t: englishrussia























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/how-you-live-in-russia-when-you-supervise-local-road-police/