Artist Creates Colorful Illustrations Of Inviting And Cozy Japanese Houses

Have you ever heard of “Virtual Plein Air”? It is a term used to describe an act of creating art inspired by Google Street Views. Artists literally look for exciting or interesting places they can then use as a source for their illustrations.

In today’s article, we want to introduce you to an artist who got fascinated by Japanese houses she saw on Street Views and started painting them. Her name is Angela Hao and she is an illustrator based in the United States. Even though she is far away from Japan, she manages to explore that country by simply using Google Street View. Not even the pandemic can stop her! She draws tiny, Studio Ghibli-like restaurants, shops and cafes that are so charming you might want to visit them.

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda


















































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/12/artist-creates-colorful-illustrations-of-inviting-and-cozy-japanese-houses/

Fascinating Black and White Pictures of New York Street Life in the Late 1960s

These pictures were taken by James Jowers, an American street photographer. Jowers began receiving training in photography and darkroom techniques while serving in the United States Army.

While working the night shift as a porter at St. Luke’s Hospital, he would spend his free time during the day roaming the streets of his Lower East Side neighborhood and the rest of Manhattan, capturing a gritty, funny, and idiosyncratic view of the city.

Jowers’ photographs were included as illustrations for articles in The New York Times and Forbes in the 1970s. In 2007 and 2008, George Eastman Museum acquired the photographs and negatives he made between 1964 and 1980.

More: George Eastman Museum h/t: vintag.es





































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/12/fascinating-black-and-white-pictures-of-new-york-street-life-in-the-late-1960s/

25 Winners & Finalists Of LensCulture 2021 Street Photography Awards

1st Place Series: Reflections Inside the Seoul Metro by Argus Paul Estabrook

Here are the winners and finalists of the LensCulture 2021 Street Photography Awards.

On the heels of a global pandemic, with cities around the world reopening little by little, we wondered what the 2021 Street Photography Awards would show us. Would images be celebratory, with photographers reveling in the closeness of passersby after more than a year of solitude? Or would they remain eerily quiet and uncertain?

What we discovered was a wide world caught somewhere between before and after Covid-19. This year’s competition brought us hundreds of entries, revealing the hustle and bustle of daily life proceeding as it once did, but in new, often socially distanced spaces. And we were reminded that photographers express themselves with metaphors and emotions, as much as they do with the street scenes unfolding around them.

More: LensCulture, Instagram, Facebook h/t: 121clicks

From Seoul to Sydney, Rio to Manhattan, Istanbul to Yangoon City — talented photographers showed us their daily habitats captured brilliantly with light, shadow, color, drama, serendipity, and often a sense of humor.

2nd Place Series: In Visible Light by Sam Ferris

3rd Place Series: Out of the Shadow by Anna Biret

1st Place Single: In the Shadow by Bego Amaré

2nd Place Single: Geometric Hong Kong by Jason Au

3rd Place Single: Goat Auction in Nizwa by Maude Bardet

Jurors’ Picks: Independent Mysteries by Michael Magers

Jurors’ Picks: In Search Of It by Murat Harmanlikli

Finalist: The Light Smoker by Andrea Pozzoni

Finalist: Sea of Socks by Nrian Hodges

Finalist: My Splendid Mirage by Ed Peters

Finalist: The Trees Knows All by Giannis Giannelos

Finalist: Floating in the Sky by Herve Chatel

Finalist: Human Theatre by Merja Varkemaa

Finalist: Preparing for Paradise by Michael Mcilvaney

Finalist: Suit and Tie by Noel Rivera

Finalist: White Wall by Ole Christiansen

Finalist: Out From The Shadows by Pelle Sten

Finalist: Street Moment From NYC by Sicong Wu

Finalist: Struggle by Thaw Aung

Finalist: Dream On by Tufan Cevahirci

Finalist: Guilt by Thanakorn Treratanaboot

Finalist: Lido di Venezia, 2020 by Pier Andrea Perini

Finalist: Eyes of the City by Emre Cakmak

Finalist: Untitled by Umbrto Verdoliva

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/25-winners-finalists-of-lensculture-2021-street-photography-awards/

Amazing Photos Capture Street Scenes of New York City in the 1990s

At the dawn of the 1990s, New York City was in an unremittingly bleak state. Following two decades of continuous decay, 1990 brought yet another all-time record high in violent crime and to this day, 1990 and the three years that followed remain the most homicide-plagued stretch in the city’s last five decades. The 1990s had quickly positioned itself to become the city’s worst decade yet.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

Yet something unprecedented occurred in the latter half of the decade: The crime rate fell by half and the murder rate by a third, with each year better than the last. By the time the decade was over, New York was a safer place than it had been at any point since the 1960s.

And it showed. By the time the 1990s ended, the city was pulling in 7 million more tourists a year while the city’s population began to grow for the first time in decades.

The 1990s in New York City was an improbable success story on a level seldom seen before. What at first looked like a new nadir for America’s biggest city instead became one of the greatest urban revitalizations in American history.

These amazing photos were taken by Steven Siegel (previously featured) that show what New York City looked like from the 1990s.














































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/amazing-photos-capture-street-scenes-of-new-york-city-in-the-1990s/

“Moments Around the World”: Amazing Cinematic Travel and Street Photography by Billy Dinh

Billy Dinh is a travel and street photographer based in New York City. Also an illustrator and painting, he accidentally got into photography when he bought his first camera with the intention of only capturing reference photos for his art work.

Inspired by street photography, Billy introduces a different perspective as he captures candid moments and places around New York City and different parts of the world. Billy incorporates his illustration background to bring to life a visual story with each photograph. In addition to photography, Billy enjoys bourbon and is forever searching for the best bowl of Ramen.

More: Billy Dinh, Instagram































































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/moments-around-the-world-amazing-cinematic-travel-and-street-photography-by-billy-dinh/

Accidentally Brilliant Shots By Edas Won

There’s a saying that if you let a monkey write random stuff, eventually it will write Shakespeare’s Hamlet. If you transfer the analogy to photography, it would be something like this: if you see tons of random stuff, you’ll eventually see something that might look intentional, sublime, and even brilliant.

While most photographers rely on perfect planning of their shots, others, like Edas Wong, just trust their luck and instinct. He just roams the streets and tries to find something that might catch his eye. Even though his shots could be called “accidental,” they’re no less brilliant. It just blows my mind how a lucky perspective can create a metaphor, a juxtaposition, and can flow like visual poetry. It just goes to show that some things are best left in the hands of fortune.

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda





























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/accidentally-brilliant-shots-by-edas-won/

Amazing Snapshots Capture Street Life in New York City From the Mid-1930s to the End of the 1940s

In the late 1930s, photographer Helen Levitt rode the New York City subway system, first as an apprentice to photographer Walker Evans, then snapping photos of aloof passengers wearing fur coats, flat-brim hats, and antique brooches.

h/t: vintag.es

Yet for the majority of Levitt’s illustrious career (lasting until the 1990s), she ventured out of the underground to document life on Manhattan streets. She captured authentic moments — children playing on the sidewalk or dressing up for Halloween, a group of women gossiping — in neighborhoods including Harlem, the Lower East Side, and the Garment District.

Levitt spoke about her early pictures shot on the streets in the 1930s: “It was a good neighborhood for taking pictures in those days, because that was before television. There was a lot happening. And the older people would be sitting out on the stoops because of the heat. Those neighborhoods were very active.”

The New York Times, in 2009, described her as: “a major photographer of the 20th century who caught fleeting moments of surpassing lyricism, mystery and quiet drama on the streets of her native New York”.


























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/amazing-snapshots-capture-street-life-in-new-york-city-from-the-mid-1930s-to-the-end-of-the-1940s/

This Instagram Account Documents a World of Anonymous Street Style in New York

We’ve all seen those “candid” paparazzi shots of celebrities. They know they’re going to be photographed, so they come armed with a strategic (and eye-catching) ensemble, which is often executed by a professional stylist. But the next time you’re wandering around Manhattan and hear the sound of a camera shutter going off, watch out for photographer Johnny Cirillo—because he could be taking your picture, not a celebrity’s.

On his Instagram page, @watchingnewyork, Cirillo enjoys photographing regular, stylish New Yorkers and giving them the paparazzi treatment. No stylists, no glam team: Cirillo likes to document real people with real style.

h/t: vogue

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/this-instagram-account-documents-a-world-of-anonymous-street-style-in-new-york/

Jack London’s Extraordinary Photos of London’s East End in 1902

Men sleeping in Green Park.

In 1902 the American author Jack London visited his namesake city – at the time when it was still the largest in the world. In a book that became to be known as The People of the Abyss he described the time when he lived in the Whitechapel district sleeping in workhouses, so-called doss-houses and even on the streets.

It was said that about half a million people were living in these awful and terrible conditions in Britain’s capital city. London took the photographs that illustrated his extraordinary book (between 1900 and 1916 the American writer took more than 12 thousand photographs).

London was most disturbed by the number of “old men, young men, all manner of men, and boys to boot, and all manner of boys” who had no other choice other than to sleep on the streets. “Some were drowsing standing up; half a score of them were stretched out on the stone steps in most painful postures…the skin of their bodies showing red through the holes, and rents in their rags.”

h/t: flashbak, buy prints

Spitalfields at the junction of Commercial Street and Brushfield Street. The building at the right is Spitalfields Market. To the left is a branch of the Pearce & Plenty cafe chain, with a sign for the General Gordon Temperance Hotel.

Men working in casual ward of workhouse picking oakum – teasing out of fibres from old ropes and was very hard on the fingers.

Inside the courtyard of Salvation Army barracks Sunday Morning.

An East End Slavey (a maidservant, especially a hard-worked one.)

Bank Holiday, Whitechapel.

A street in Wapping

“Gigantic dosshouse” Rowton House, Fieldgate Street, Whitechapel

“A policeman shines a flashlight onto a young man sleeping on the sidewalk against a building. A sign displayed in a window to the left reads: “Truth The Weekly Newspaper.”

Homeless Women Spitalfields Garden (church yard of Christ Church)

Homeless men and women Spitifield Gardens (Christ Church churchyard).

Frying Pan Alley,(Situated close to Middlesex Street and Petticoat Lane market) Spitalfields

A group of men stand out on the stoop of a four-story brick building, while a few women and children walk by on the sidewalk. A sign over the entrance reads: “No. 1 Victoria Home for Working Men.” (original caption)

Whitechapel Infirmary -Wide view along the front of a long, four-story building with arched windows on the first floor. Two horse-drawn carriages are on the street in the distance. (original caption)

View in Stratford.

“Two relay system lodging, lodgers who have been on night work waiting till the beds of a doss house are vacated by men employed during the way.” – original caption

Under the arches of the bridges that span the Thames

Part of a room to let. A typical East End home where the people live, sleep, eat all in one room.

Mile End Road showing the People’s Palace

Casual ward of Whitechapel Workhouse above, beds rolled up on left and right

A shop where old clothes are sold – A group of children and a handful of adults, stand around a table that is covered with clothing. Jackets and coats are hung on an outside wall behind them, and shoes, hats, and other items sit on the ground around the table. (original caption)

View in Hoxton.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/jack-londons-extraordinary-photos-of-londons-east-end-in-1902/

London in 1979 Through Fascinating Photos of George Kindbom

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. The city stands on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea. London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

The City of London, London’s ancient core and financial centre − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that closely follow its medieval limits.

London is one of the world’s most important global cities. It exerts a considerable impact upon the arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and development, tourism and transportation.

London has a diverse range of people and cultures, and more than 300 languages are spoken in the region. it is the third-most populous city in Europe, and accounts for 13.4% of the U.K. population.

London contains four World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London; Kew Gardens; the site comprising the Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey, and St Margaret’s Church; and the historic settlement in Greenwich where the Royal Observatory, Greenwich defines the Prime Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. Other landmarks include Buckingham Palace, the London Eye, Piccadilly Circus, St Paul’s Cathedral, Tower Bridge, Trafalgar Square and The Shard. The London Underground is the oldest underground railway network in the world.

These fascinating photos were taken by George Kindbom that show street scenes of London in 1979.























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/london-in-1979-through-fascinating-photos-of-george-kindbom/