NFT Art: Sophia the Robot ‘Self-Portrait’ Sells for Almost $700K


AP

Sophia is a robot of many talents — she speaks, jokes, sings and even makes art. In March, she caused a stir in the art world when a digital work she created as part of a collaboration was sold at an auction for $688,888 in the form of NFT.

More: Nifty Gateway, Andrea Bonaceto, Sophia the Robot


andreabonac_art

David Hanson, CEO of Hong Kong-based Hanson Robotics and Sophia’s creator, has been developing robots for the past two and a half decades. He believes realistic-looking robots can connect with people and assist in industries such as healthcare and education.


Reuters

Sophia is the most famous robot creation from Hanson Robotics, with the ability to mimic facial expressions, hold conversations and recognize people. In 2017, she was granted Saudi Arabian citizenship, becoming the world’s first robot citizen.


andreabonac_art

Sophia collaborated with Italian artist Andrea Bonaceto, who drew portraits of Sophia. Sophia then processed his work via neural networks and proceeded to create a digital artwork of her own.


Reuters

The digital work that sold for $688,888 is titled “Sophia Instantiation”, and is a 12-second video file which shows Bonaceto’s portrait evolving into Sophia’s digital painting. It is accompanied by the physical artwork painted by Sophia.


andreabonac_art

The buyer, a digital artwork collector and artist known as 888 with the Twitter handle @Crypto888crypto, later sent Sophia a photo of his painted arm. The robot then processed that, adding that image to her knowledge and painted more strokes on top of her original piece.


andreabonac_art

In a tweet on Sophia’s account, the work was described as the first NFT collaboration between an “AI, a mechanical collective being and an artist-collector.”


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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/nft-art-sophia-the-robot-self-portrait-sells-for-almost-700k/

Wolseley-Vickers “Wheel-Cum-Track” Car, 1926

If you’ve ever gotten a car stuck in the mud, snow, or any other kind of slippery surface, then you have an idea of how helpful having tank-style tracks can be in specific scenarios. Obviously, though, there are disadvantages to driving a tank around city streets, but that’s a problem that Wolseley-Vickers attempted to solve with its “Wheel-Cum-Track” car all the way back in 1926.

h/t: vintag.es, thedrive

Equipped with both tracks and regular wheels, the vehicle could be driven around like a traditional car or it could lower its tracks to tackle tougher terrain like a tank. It’s called the Wolseley-Vickers because it’s actually based on a regular Wolseley car, with Vickers adding the track system later on. That being said, it’s not a very aesthetically pleasing combination, to say the least.

Being built in 1926, there’s not much information readily available about it, but we do know it was likely being evaluated for use as a sort of all-terrain staff car. Records from the British Imperial War Museum seem to indicate that the car was tested in trials to determine its capability against a number of other similar vehicles, including offerings from Citroën and different British manufacturers along with Vickers.

Although images of the vehicle in the open-top cabriolet configuration are not available from the British Imperial War Museum, it does have photos of the vehicle in a different configuration. Seeming more tank than staff car this time around, this armored-up version of the vehicle apparently could travel 15 miles per hour on tracks, or 25 on its wheels. Clearly, the added mechanical complexity wasn’t really worth just ten miles per hour.

In the end, one can assume that the need for such a vehicle was satisfied by less-complicated contraptions like half-tracks and smaller, faster tanks. However, the Wolseley-Vickers “Wheel-Cum-Track” car is still an interesting vehicle, and indeed one that was likely as cool to drive as it was complex. It certainly has a unique aesthetic, to say the least.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/wolseley-vickers-wheel-cum-track-car-1926/

The Cars That Money Can’t Buy: 1953-1955 Alfa Romeo B.A.T. Concepts


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys

Unconstrained by the limitations of budget and the realities of manufacturing, concept cars afford talented designers the opportunity to explore their wildest and most progressive ideas. At their best, these dazzling, artistic creations invite us to totally reimagine what the automobile can be.

h/t: rmsothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys

As in the world of fashion, however, car design evolves quickly; it is unusual to find a concept that remains relevant after its allotted time in the spotlight comes to an end, let alone one that is still compelling over six decades after its debut. Rarer still is the concept that transcends its role as a design exercise to embody the sculptural potential of the automotive form. And when it comes to a trilogy of concepts that effortlessly achieves both feats, there is but one spectacular example: The Alfa Romeo Berlina Aerodinamica Tecnica series by Franco Scaglione.

Whether considered the ultimate three-movement concerto of automobile design or the only true automotive triptych ever produced, few will contest the greatness of the B.A.T. 5, 7, and 9d concepts. Hand-built by the storied Carrozzeria Bertone of Turin, Italy and introduced in 1953, 1954, and 1955, respectively, these cars were pioneering in their use of aerodynamics. With flamboyant aesthetics that simultaneously minimized drag for optimal performance, the B.A.T. cars were immediately and enthusiastically embraced by press and public alike.

Individually, each of the B.A.T.s is, without exaggeration, among the most important automotive concepts ever built. Presented collectively, their significance deepens: Uniquely in the automotive world, the B.A.T.s are best understood as variations on a singular theme, a complete work in three parts. Like a Francis Bacon triptych, examining one car in the context of the other two reveals new aspects of their forms, as well as the captivating details incorporated into the hand-shaped bodywork of each.

Put simply, since the inception of the internal combustion engine, no one vehicle—let alone an interwoven trilogy—has so compellingly explored the concept of the automobile as pure kinetic sculpture as the Alfa Romeo B.A.T. 5, 7, and 9d.

The three Alfa Romeo B.A.T. cars sold on October 2019, as a set, for $14.8 million.

BAT 5 was painted grey with red grilles, red upholstery and grey carpet.

Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys

For BAT 7 the original side profile was cleaned up; it featured fully faired-in cooling vents for the front brakes and larger intake scoops for those at the rear. Meanwhile, instead of exiting underneath the car (as had been the case with BAT 5), BAT 7 had its exhausts fully shrouded into the sides of the rear bodywork.

Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys

With little chance of significantly improving BAT 7’s extraordinary aerodynamic efficiency, Alfa Romeo decided to take a slightly different approach for the last car in the series: BAT 9.

Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys


Ron Kimball/RM Sothebys

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/the-cars-that-money-cant-buy-1953-1955-alfa-romeo-b-a-t-concepts/

Digital Artist Reimagines Famous Paintings In Today’s Context Of Technology And Social Media

Narcissus 2.0

The most iconic paintings throughout history are still carrying important messages through the art of today’s artists. An Italian digital artist, known on social media as CRUDEOIL 2.0, gave old paintings a new life as social satire.

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda

The World Of Social Media

The 24-year-old artist reimagined famous classical paintings in the modern world, with a highlight on technology and social media, to poke fun at what’s wrong with our world. CRUDEOIL 2.0 has a degree in Fashion Design, but in parallel to the world of fashion, he is “following an artistic path by using software such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and After Effects for the animation of images.”

“Can You Follow Me On Instagram?” A Different Way To Be Romantic Nowadays. Sad Story. The End

“My imagery was born as a critique of society, saturated with social, aesthetic canons, and appearances. This concept is reflected in my works that deal with social media as a new religion and a new creed. To express my intent, I take artworks from the past and re-contextualize them to the present day. In fact, in my works, the main character is a smartphone, my identifying mark,” the artist told Bored Panda.

The World Of Social Media

“My first inspiration is society and everything around us every day: smartphones, technology in general, social media, aesthetic canons, and trends. At the beginning of my artistic journey, I found inspiration from Christopher Boffoli and his ‘big appetites studio.’ Now, I really appreciate the works of Banksy and TvBoy.”

“Can You Hear Me?”

“I would like people who look at my artworks to think about how our lives have changed with social networks. It is a real critique, a complaint, and a sort of reflexive irony against society, using social media to express my thoughts,” CRUDEOIL 2.0 explained.

Silence

In his work, the artist talks about beauty standards, the chase for likes and follows, objectification, dependence on social media, the narcissism that comes with popularity, and other topics.

“My intent is to continue to spread these messages that they are always evolving. Every day I have a new idea of how I can make my works the best they can be.”

Reminder: “Don’t Stir Up Hatred And Don’t Be Indifferent In Front Of It.” Do Something

The decision to use classic paintings by some of the best artists through history is not accidental. CRUDEOIL 2.0 hopes to educate younger audiences about art history while expressing his opinions on the world at the same time: “The choice of using classic paintings is an attempt to spread art also among the younger generation.”

Reminder: “Don’t Hide Behind Your Armour” Express Yourself

The artist told us about the process of creating his satirical images: “I don’t have a fixed procedure. Sometimes I start with the classic painting and sometimes I start from an idea. Often the paintings inspire me and afterwards, I imagine how they can be nowadays.”

“The New Intercessor” Slaves

Started just a few months ago, CRUDEOIL 2.0 has gained almost 8 thousand followers on Instagram. The artist says he is prepared for any reaction that his controversial art might evoke.

“I am conscious that my works deal with strong themes against society and I’m ready for any reactions they may provoke in people. However, I have a lot of positive feedback because people, through my works, think about the message I would like to express.”

Plastic Surgery

When asked what he would change about the society we live in, the artist said: “I think modern society is too focused on appearances, on people’s opinion, and on getting consent. Social media has an important role in our lives, so much so that some people try to imitate the lifestyle of the most influencing users, from their aesthetic to the way they dress.”

Plastic Surgery

Finally, CRUDEOIL 2.0 had some encouraging words for any upcoming artists: “I would like to advise all upcoming artists to have the courage to express their art, whatever it may be. Art is a freedom of expression.”

CRUDEOIL 2.0 admitted that when the world goes back to normal, or at least when it’s possible, he would like to take part in a temporary exhibition or have his artwork exhibited in an art gallery.

The World Of Social Media

Narcissus

The Flagellation Nowadays

Enter Password

Low Battery

Touch To Believe

“It’s A Match!” – Tinder Edition

Social Dilemma

Live

Reminder: “No Fear, Be Yourself”

Reminder: “This Society Makes Us All The Same. Please Save Yourself”

“Social Martyrdom”- Haters And Spectators

Come With Me

Ig Story “Reactions”

Do Not Disturb

The World Of Social Media

Ask Me A Question

Social Dilemma

Reminder: “Make-Up And Painted Nails Are Not Only For Women”

Digital Love

Sad Story

The World Of Social Media

Sensitive Content

Burn

The New Creation

New Generation

Overdose

Life Is Hell

Comfort Zone

This Is Not Real

Ecstasy

Social Network Like a Drug

Metamorphosis

Plastic Surgery

Plastic Surgery

Come On, Kiss Me!

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/digital-artist-reimagines-famous-paintings-in-todays-context-of-technology-and-social-media/

Customized “Pioneers” and the Road of Life

Narrow-gauge line is the relic of the industrialization century, and such vehicles of simple construction randomly appeared in the remotest corners of the world. They carried people and loads in deep taiga or ore mines. With no exaggeration, they were moving for life.

h/t: englishrussia

This narrow-gauge line in Ural was built in late XIX century to become the longest one in the world. It connecred some dozens of settlements with civilization, that is why people called it “the road of life”.

And such motorcars became the most convenient method of transportation. TD-5U “Pioneer” also known as “mad stools” were produced in the 50s, the maximum speed of the vehicles reached 37 mph (60 km/h). It has always caused many accidents. People used to make their own customized “pioneers”, added different features thereto – for example an engine of a motorcycle “Minsk”. Wealthier families could have several “pioneers”. Sons inherited them from fathers but also made their own to prove their maturity.






SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/customized-pioneers-and-the-road-of-life/

Funny Air Filter Gives You a Dog Nose Filter in Real Life

Nosy, an wearable air filter you put on your nose, has been getting a lot of attention because it makes wearers look like they activated the dog nose filter in real-life.

Designed to protect against airborne particles, Nosy is a slick and compact air filter and purifier that fits on your nose. Its patent-pending dual filtration system (Activated Carbon and HEPA filters) allegedly break down toxic gases from fossil fuel emissions and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), while at the same time from particles down to 0.03 microns in size, like pollen, dust, mold spores, smoke, and more. But all anyone seems to be talking about these days is how funny people look wearing it.

More: Nosy, Instagram h/t: odditycentral

Nosy was unveiled in March of last year, when it managed to surpass its crowdfunding goal on Kickstarter. It was supposed to be delivered to backers by December of last year, but according to the latest official update, the Covid-19 pandemic has seriously impacted production. Nosy founder Carina Cunha wrote that she expects deliveries to be delayed until April 2021.

So you’ll have to wait to actually see people walking down the streets with Nosy filters on their noses, but you can have some fun with promotional pictures until that happens. Twitter has certainly been having a field day with them lately, because of how funny Nosy wearers look.

But to the team behind the project, Nosy is no joke. They set out to create a product that not only protects the wearer against the harmful effects of pollution, but is also a more efficient and comfortable alternative to face masks of all kinds.

“Our belief is that wearing a Nosy should be as comfortable as possible so we created a solution that provides you with the most effective filtration and the best user experience,” the official Nosy presentation reads. “Our malleable clip allows a custom fit for each nose! The clip attaches to the outer shell using a magnetic attachment system, ensuring that Nosy will stay in place even when you are doing vigorous activity!”

Nosy filters last up to 100 hours, but for hygienic reasons the company recommends that you change them at least once a week.








SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/funny-air-filter-gives-you-a-dog-nose-filter-in-real-life/

1970 Lancia Stratos Zero: A Crazy Concept from The Wedge Era

Pininfarina and Bertone were two of Italy’s best recognized and most successful postwar coachbuilders. Both Milanese carrozzerie competed for commissions and they debuted outrageous concept cars to impress the public and to entice automakers into choosing one of them over the other. In 1970, at the Turin Auto Show, Bertone unveiled the Lancia Stratos HF, which soon became popularly known by its internal nickname: Zero.

h/t: fristartmuseum

To challenge Pininfarina, whose designs tended to be alluringly curvaceous, Bertone produced a very low, sharply chiseled coupe that appeared to have been carved out of a solid block of bronze. At only 33 inches high, it was arguably low enough to be driven right under a semitrailer. Design experts have commented that the Stratos HF Zero was a significant step between the 1968 Alfa Romeo Carabo and the production Lamborghini Countach.

Even after more than thirty years, the Stratos remains extremely futuristic looking. Nothing about it was conventional, save for the wheels in all four corners. The steering column could be moved forward to allow more room to enter the vehicle. Simultaneously, a hydraulic mechanism opened the wide Perspex windscreen, which served as the car’s single door. Occupants could see directly ahead and above—and little else.

The cost of building the Zero was reportedly forty million lire (about $450,000 in 1970). Nuccio Bertone drove the Stratos on public roads to Lancia’s offices, dazzling all who saw the impossibly low coupe, and marveling at it himself when he drove it under the closed entrance barriers at Lancia’s racing department.

The result of that meeting was the radical Lancia Stratos rally car. Although the production Lancia Stratos, with its midmounted Fiat/Ferrari V-6 engine, did not closely resemble the Zero, the edgy, all-wheel-drive race car would probably not have been built had it not been for the influence of the inimitable Zero.














SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/1970-lancia-stratos-zero-a-crazy-concept-from-the-wedge-era/

Explorer Visits Abandoned and World’s Largest Ekranoplan, Here Are Some Great Pictures of The Inside and Outside

Many people have seen the ekranoplan from outside but few have had a chance to get inside. This vehicle is something in between an aircraft and a ship. “Lun” is the world biggest ground effect vehicle designed in the USSR in late 70s. Now the ekranoplan as big as a five-storey building is in Derbent, it has been preserved as a museum exhibit.

Yuri Urykov, who shared these photos, says he had a real technical ecstasy when he got inside the vehicle. “It has not been used for 20 years, but the filling is almost like new. It smells oil and kerosene, many devices and motors are still there. Just like bed sheets and documents”.

More: Facebook h/t: englishrussia

The Lun-class ekranoplan is a ground effect vehicle designed by Rostislav Alexeyev in 1975 and used by the Soviet and Russian navies from 1987 until sometime in the late 1990s.

It flew using the lift generated by the ground effect of its large wings when within about four metres (13 ft) above the surface of the water. Although they might look similar to regular aircraft, and have related technical characteristics, ekranoplans like the Lun are not aircraft, seaplanes, hovercraft, nor hydrofoils. Rather, “ground effect” is a distinct technology. The International Maritime Organization classifies these vehicles as maritime ships.

The name Lun comes from the Russian word for harrier.

On 31 July 2020, the only completed MD-160 Lun class ekranoplan was towed from Kaspiysk naval base to Derbent, Dagestan. It will be put on display at the planned Patriot Park. The journey was approximately 100 km (62 miles) across the Caspian Sea; moving the ekranoplan required the use of rubber pontoons, three tugboats and two escort vessels. However, while towing the vessel to its destination, the vehicle got stuck in the sandy beach on the shore of the Caspian Sea just south of the town of Derbent. The vehicle was too heavy to be pulled off the sand and the managing team was not properly equipped, so the ekranoplan was secured and stayed on the beach for next 5 months, becoming a local attraction. Ground works and a new attempt in December 2020, finally resulted in the plane being moved some 20-30m from the sea.




































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/explorer-visits-abandoned-and-worlds-largest-ekranoplan-here-are-some-great-pictures-of-the-inside-and-outside/

This Company Turns a Disassembled Smartphone Into Decor for Your Home

GRID is a company that has been selling framed electronic products for some time, and they all seem pretty cool. For Apple fans, they have pieces with the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4s, iPhone 5, and the second-generation iPod touch.

“In this digital technology era today, some digital products will be brought back your memories. Although it symbolized the wisdom of great person and delegate the revolution of technologies, they are getting quiet and disappearing gradually.

We select the precious collection of marvellous article, unfold and restore in a collage frame,turn them into a tale of smart phone generation with value of art, the best choice for your collection permanently.”

More: GRID, Instagram h/t: 9to5mac
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/this-company-turns-a-disassembled-smartphone-into-decor-for-your-home/

Mechanical Secrets of Moving Gorillas in “King Kong”, 1933

Ever wonder how a Hollywood make-up man converts an actor into a terrifyingly realistic gorilla in those fascinating jungle pictures you watch on the silver screen?

A study of these photos will give you an idea of what goes on behind a gorilla face. Mechanics have devised a set of mechanical facial bones and muscles which act as the skeleton for a leather “skin” which make-up men put on.

h/t: vintag.es

A simple set of levers on the mechanism and a strip clamping over the lower teeth enable the actor to open and close his huge gorilla jaws like the real beast of the jungle. A special strap over the eyes gives the beetle browed effect.

Since gorillas have resisted all attempts to train them for use in the movies, film producers have resorted to “synthetic” animals custom-built to fit the picture. One such animal completed recently by Max Factor Studios of Hollywood, California, is made up of an aluminum skeleton with its “bones” filled out with mohair. The body is covered with a tanned leather hide into which thousands of hairs have been knotted by wig craftsmen.

Basic and motionless portions of the gorilla’s skull also are of aluminum, but the working parts in the jaws are made of aluminum, supplemented by steel springs and pinions. Bone teeth and synthetic flesh tongue and mouth lining have a natural appearance. For skin of the gorilla’s head, smooth polished chamois is used, with hair wig-stitched in the proper locale. The “bones” of the cinema gorilla’s hand extensions are of duralumin.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/mechanical-secrets-of-moving-gorillas-in-king-kong-1933/