There’s a Gaming Pc Hidden Inside This Incredible Gaming Den Diorama

There’s no shortage of ingenuity and creativity when it comes to gaming PCs, but this build takes the cake in 2021 so far. It’s a gaming PC masquerading as a PC gamer’s dream room setup, and it’s enough to make you stop scrolling and stare in awe at its stunning level of detail.

Pretty much everywhere you look in this case build there’s something special. The gaming desk is the graphics card, the aquarium is a reservoir, and piped through the wall is a Mini-ITX motherboard with hard-loop cooling.

Oh and those tiny gaming monitors? They actually work, you know.

It comes from Suchao Modding & Design, run by Suchao Prowphong out of Thailand, and was produced in partnership with Intel for its Gamer Days 2021 event.

More: Facebook h/t: pcgamer





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/theres-a-gaming-pc-hidden-inside-this-incredible-gaming-den-diorama/

The Future Imagined in Albert Robida’s “La vie électrique,” 1890

Electricity.

Who participated in the first video date? A good couple for candidacy in this regard are Georges Lorris and Estelle Lacombe, who meet via “téléphonoscope” in Albert Robida’s 1890 novel Le Vingtième siècle: la vie électrique in which he imagines “the electric life” of the future.

h/t: publicdomainreview

The old world’s dishonesty.

Adding a visual component to two recent technologies, the telephone (1876) and the phonograph (1877), this device lets scattered families in the year 1956 reunite around a virtual dinner table. For the lovebirds Lorris and Lacombe, the téléphonoscope facilitates their unapproved liaison in an immunologically fraught world. (And, for those without a beau, it also offers a service akin to on-demand streaming.)

The Sahara desert made into agricultural land after a climate overhaul.

This proto Zoom/Netflix hybrid is just one of several prescient predictions in Robida’s novel. Frictionless trains shoot through tubes, anticipating the Hyperloop, and doorknockers have been replaced with a “recording phonograph with photographic lens”, allowing residents to both screen visitors and take messages in the event of their absence: a smart doorbell before its time.

The Lauterbrunnen lighthouse.

The tubes (view from an aeronef at 700 meters).

Taking in the evening air.

From exam to exam.

A grand selection of ancestors . . . whose influence will dominate?

The engagement voyage.

Floating dungeons.

The charge of the bicyclists.

Some models from the air fleet.

A torpedo ambush.

The examination for a doctorate in Military Science.

A busy neighbourhood.

The old and the new.

The physical decay of the overrefined.

Our rivers and atmosphere — the multiplication of various pathogens, microbes, and bacteria.

The sophisticated, poisonous chemistry.

The dream of M. Arséne des Marettes.

The miasmatic war.

A national park.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/the-future-imagined-in-albert-robidas-la-vie-electrique-1890/

A Gallery of Amazing Vintage Photos of Ferraris in the 1970s

For many true aficionados, 1970s Ferraris represent a golden age for arguably the world’s most famous car marque. In the seven decades since Enzo Ferrari founded his company, they have produced some jaw-droppingly spectacular cars, but there’s something special about the sleek lines and the raw, analogue power of 1970s Ferrari models, a decade packed with outstanding motors.

h/t: vintag.es

Building on this outstanding heritage, the 1970s Ferrari models pushed the boundaries further, ushering in a new age of technological innovation, design inspiration and hardcore power. It wasn’t a simple task to shine however, they needed to compete with the bedroom poster Lamborghini Countach, the James Bond-driven Lotus Esprit Turbo and BMWs first attempt at a supercar, the M1. And they did.

Ferrari’s 1970s models were excruciatingly cool and paved the way for today’s sensational speed machines.






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/a-gallery-of-amazing-vintage-photos-of-ferraris-in-the-1970s/

1977 Pontiac Phantom, the Last Car Designed by Bill Mitchell, One of the Automobile Industry’s Best Known Designers

The Pontiac Phantom (also called the General Motors Phantom and given the internal code name “Madame X”) is a concept car created by General Motors (GM) in 1977.

h/t: vintag.es

The Phantom was designed by Bill Mitchell and Bill Davis at Mitchell’s “Studio X”. Mitchell was an accomplished designer for GM who had designed the 1938 Cadillac Sixty Special, added tailfins to the 1948 Cadillacs, and designed both the 1963 and 1968 Chevrolet Corvettes. The Phantom was conceived by Mitchell as a retirement gift to himself and was also the last project for his Studio X, which had reopened to design the car. The lines of the Phantom are evocative of the late-1930s Cadillacs that Mitchell had designed earlier in his career.

The Phantom is a fastback two-seat coupe built on the chassis of a Pontiac Grand Prix. It only consists of a fiberglass shell and does not have a drivetrain, rendering it inoperable.

The car was considered a “personal expression” of Mitchell’s. He described the Phantom as “the kind of car I’d like to drive.” Mitchell elaborated that “with the energy crisis and other considerations, the glamour car would not be around for long. I wanted to leave a memory at General Motors of the kind of cars I love.” In the words of Jerry Hirshberg, who would later become head of design at Nissan, Mitchell “was fighting old battles and withdrawing increasingly from a world that was being redefined by consumerism, Naderism and an emerging consciousness of the environment.”

The Phantom project was initially supported by Pontiac, although they did not maintain support throughout development. Mitchell sent the car to the Milford Proving Grounds with the goal of impressing GM’s board of directors. However, when executive vice president of product planning and technical staffs Howard Kehrl saw the car, he ordered it to be removed from the proving grounds immediately.

After designing the Phantom, Mitchell retired in 1977, holding the position of director of the General Motors Styling Division at the time. The car is currently in the collection of the Sloan Museum in Flint, Michigan.


SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/1977-pontiac-phantom-the-last-car-designed-by-bill-mitchell-one-of-the-automobile-industrys-best-known-designers/

Beautiful Photos of Fiat X1/9, One of the First Truly Affordable Mid-Engine Sports Cars

The Bertone X1/9 is a two-seater sports car designed by Bertone and built by Fiat from 1972–1982 and subsequently by Gruppo Bertone from 1982–1989. Intended to be the first affordable mid-engined sports car, the X1/9 is notable for its sharp styling and impeccable handling.

h/t: vintag.es

The targa top can be stored in the front luggage compartment. It was originally designed as a sports car for the masses. The X1/9 came stock with a single overhead cam 1290cc engine that was mounted transversely ahead of the rear axle line and a four-speed transmission.

After 1978, it came with a 1489cc engine and a five-speed transmission. X1/9s have four wheel independent suspension with Macpherson struts. The brakes are disc, front and back. It has rack and pinion steering. No power brakes or power steering, and all the instrumentation is analog.

For the U.S. market, additional emission control equipment and large safety bumpers were added, which sapped performance.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/beautiful-photos-of-fiat-x1-9-one-of-the-first-truly-affordable-mid-engine-sports-cars/

Back When the Rotor Rides Were Fun and Dangerous!

The Rotor is an amusement park ride, designed and patented by German engineer Ernst Hoffmeister in 1948. The ride was first demonstrated at Oktoberfest 1949, and was exhibited at fairs and events throughout Europe, during the 1950s and 1960s. The ride still appears in numerous amusement parks, although traveling variants have been surpassed by the Gravitron.

h/t: vintag.es

The ride itself was a scientific experience as riders felt the force of centripetal acceleration seemingly sticking them to the wall. What is happening on the rotor falls in line with Newtonian physics in that a body in motion remains in motion unless acted upon by a resisting force.

A rider traveling around the drum of a rotor is constantly changing the direction of their motion but at any given point Newtonian laws state that they would prefer, if unhindered, to continue traveling in the direction they are traveling at that particular moment in time. However, every split second whilst the ride spins the planar vector that defines what is perpendicular keeps changing, thus the rider feels that they are being pushed outwards against the wall of the drum.

The sequence of the ride varied in the early machines. Some loaded at the top with the floor dropping as the riders are pinned to the wall and as the ride slows the riders slip ungraciously down to the floor and exit in the pit of the drum. Others saw the floor lower and then return to allow riders a bit more dignity as they left via the top of the drum. Finally some machines loaded at the bottom, pushed the riders up with an elevating floor, which then descended and re-ascended to pick up the riders.











SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/back-when-the-rotor-rides-were-fun-and-dangerous/

Diathermy in Beauty Culture From From the 1930s

Coin-operated diathermy machine. Pay your 25 cents and stick a hot, germy mask on your face that hundreds of others have sweated into beforehand!

When the term diathermy is used in beauty culture it usually refers to ‘surgical diathermy.’ Diathermy treatments of this type – also known a thermolysis – were used from the 1930s onwards in beauty culture as an alternative to electrolysis for the permanent removal of superfluous hair, spider veins (telangiectasia), acne, warts, moles and other skin blemishes.

h/t: vintag.es

High-frequency diathermy could be replaced with a simple heating pad. This mask appears to be a Thera Therm Electro-Velour face mask. Introduced around 1938, it was operated by an adjustable heating pad, similar to those used in electric blankets.

High-frequency currents have also been used in beauty treatments to warm the face and body as with ‘medical diathermy’. The first use of diathermy in this manner in beauty culture, was Elizabeth Arden’s Vienna Youth Mask. Introduced in 1928, it was claimed to have a rejuvenating effect by stimulating the circulation of blood through the facial tissues.

Surgical diathermy treatment, possibly for pimples or acne, 1933.

Other salons followed Arden’s lead and facial treatments incorporating diathermal heat became quite common in the 1930s, in part because the machines could also be used to remove hair through thermolysis:

“Treatment begins by cleansing the face, which is then dried with tissue and the mask applied. The chin electrode is first fixed in place by an adjustable rubber strap. In similar manner, double cheek electrode bands and the forehead electrode band is fixed. The cables, which are heavily insulated, are then attached and circuits closed. The resulting sensation is a pleasant, deep-reaching warmth; the consequence of a 10 minutes controlled application is a thorough enduring stimulation of skin and sub-cutaneous tissues. This intensive stimulus is not to be achieved by massage, or any available lotion, and is under full control of the operator. (The Hairdresser and Beauty Trade, 1936)”

Silk mask and electrode method, 1936.

Mention should also be made of indirect high-frequency treatments, also known as a Viennese massage. These combined a facial massage with a high-frequency current to heat the skin under the therapist’s fingers.

Surgical diathermy treatment to coagulate acne pustules, although the model in this photograph does not look like she has an acne problem, 1939.

Although there are some salons today that offer warming diathermy treatments as a ‘circulation booster’ during a facial, these are not typical. A more common and more recent use of ‘medical diathermy’ in beauty culture has been in cellulite treatments. Although it is generally combined with other procedures rather than used in isolation, the deep heat produced by diathermy has been claimed to enhance collagen production; increase blood circulation through vasodilation; improve lymphatic drainage of trapped fatty deposits; and even break down fat cells.

A rubber mask contained a series of heating coils that would allegedly “melt away” fine lines and wrinkles, 1939.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/diathermy-in-beauty-culture-from-from-the-1930s/

A.I. Helps To Answer What The Kids Of Famous Fictional Couples Would Look Like

Diana Prince And Steve Trevor (Wonder Woman)
Gal Gadot and Chris Pine

According to Hidreley Diao: “In movies and TV series, we often see couples that radiate chemistry and immediately become fan favorites. But sadly these couples are fictional and sometimes don’t even end up together on the TV screens. Even if they do end up living their happily ever after, we rarely get to see what their kids would look like (if they decide to have any).

After thinking about that for a while, I decided to combine famous fictional couples and see what their kids would look like. You can check out the first part of this series by clicking here. Today I am continuing this ‘experiment.’ To create these edits, I use a bunch of different apps and A.I.”

Monica And Chandler (Friends)
Courteney Cox and Matthew Perry

“I first research the couples I chose to do for this project. I usually go for the most popular TV series or movies. I then find the best-fitting photos and use apps like FaceApp, Remini, and Photoshop Gradient to create the kids these fictional couples would have.

My personal favorite couple is Brenda and Dylan from Beverly Hills. I used to watch the show when I was little, so there’s a lot of nostalgia and good memories involved. I tried really hard to make their kid look as realistic as possible to what they would have.”

Jim And Pam (The Office)
John Krasinski and Jenna Fischer

“I really love digital art and discovering new features of A.I. Playing around with it has been my favorite thing ever. It’s a great inspiration to continue these kinds of projects and come up with new, exciting ideas. Not to mention being able to see things that I never thought I could—like the kids of fictional couples.”

Chidi And Eleanor (The Good Place)
William Jackson Harper and Kristen Bell

“My favorite part of creating these A.I. edits is seeing the result at the end. Seeing that your hard work paid off and you actually have a decent result, where you can see the resemblance of both parents.

My least favorite part is when I push myself too hard and overthink the process. That causes a lot of delays and the image then can take a lot of hours to finish.”

Buffy And Spike (Buffy The Vampire Slayer)
Sarah Michelle Gellar and James Marsters

“If you want to create these edits by yourself, all I can say is that the internet is your best friend. I never took any courses, I just Googled or used YouTube to find tutorials or tips on how to use certain programs. Also, make sure that you love what you do, it will make things much easier then!”

Patrick And Kat (10 Things I Hate About You)
Heath Ledger and Julia Stiles

“I think that A.I. can be a very important future tool for art and many other things. However, we have to learn how to use it properly and not abuse it for bad things.”

Anna Scott And William Thacker (Notting Hill)
Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant

Mary Jensen And Ted Stroehmann (There’s Something About Mary)
Cameron Diaz and Ben Stiller

Luke And Lorelai (Gilmore Girls)
Scott Patterson and Lauren Graham

Jeannie And Tony Nelson (I Dream Of Jeannie)
Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman

Michael And Jackie (That 70’s Show)
Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis

Maddie And David (Moonlighting)
Cybill Shepherd and Bruce Willis

Pete And Charlie (Top Gun)
Tom Cruise and Kelly McGillis

Damon And Elena (The Vampire Diaries)
Ian Somerhalder and Nina Dobrev

Jamie And Paul Buchman (Mad About You)
Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser

Dylan And Brenda (Beverly Hills, 90210)
Luke Perry and Shannen Doherty

Romeo And Juliet (Romeo + Juliet)
Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes

Joe And Beck (You)
Penn Badgley and Elizabeth Lail

Ricky Ricardo And Lucy Ricardo (I Love Lucy)
Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball

Sun And Jin (Lost)
Kim Yoon-jin and Daniel Dae Kim

David Axelrod And Jade Butterfield (Endless Love)
Martin Hewitt and Brooke Shields

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/a-i-helps-to-answer-what-the-kids-of-famous-fictional-couples-would-look-like/

Spacelander was the Bicycle of the Future, 1946-1960

The Spacelander bicycle was designed by Benjamin Bowden for the 1946 exhibition Britain Can Make It. Originally known as the Classic, the streamlined design was said to represent what the bicycle of the future was supposed to look like.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

The frame was made from two steel clamshell halves pressed together into a monocoque and the front fork and mudguard were all one piece. The prototype featured a driveshaft and a hub dynamo that stored energy when riding downhill and gave a boost when riding uphill. The batteries inside the frame powered lights, a horn, and a built-in radio.

The bicycle was priced at $89.50, which made it one of the more expensive bicycles on the market. In addition, the fiberglass frame was relatively fragile, and its unusual nature made it difficult to market to established bicycle distributors. Only 522 Spacelander bicycles were shipped before production was halted, although more complete sets of parts were manufactured.

Beginning in the 1980s, there was a resurgence of interest in the Spacelander as a collectors’ item. The Bicycle Museum in Pennsylvania owns 17 of the proposed 38 left Spacelanders in the world.





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/spacelander-was-the-bicycle-of-the-future-1946-1960/

1934 Peugeot 601 Eclipse, the First Automatic Retractable Hardtop for an Automobile

Fixed-roof cars of the early 20th century could feel claustrophobic. But convertibles of the time were often leaky, drafty, noisy, and insecure. The advanced solution came from Peugeot in 1934, with the introduction of the retractable hardtop on its luxurious 601. The self-storing roof structure automatically disappeared behind the passenger’s compartment into a space revealed by the reverse-opening rear deck in lieu of the trunk.

This Georges Paulin design set the general design standard for retractable hardtops. The technology surfaced in an American production car when Ford introduced the 1957–1959 Skyliner, and all modern variants can trace their roots back to prewar France and have evolved from Peugeot’s idea.

h/t: vintag.es

It used an electric to operate the roof mechanism which Peugeot promised would take 15 seconds to erect or lower, but it actually took closer to a minute to fully complete. Furthermore, four such cycles were sufficient to completely drain the car’s battery a situation which meant you had to do it by hand via a manual lever.

In 1935 the 601 was further developed with minor modifications and some new body variants on the C-series of 1934 and these were classified in the series 601D. The long body styles were called 601DL. The D-series are recognizable by the lowered headlights and the elongated handles on the hood instead of the flaps.

A total of 1,235 units were produced of the C variants in 1934 and approximately 779 units of the L. There were 1,074 copies of the D variants and 911 copies of the DL.

Although the 601 was only in production for 2 years, the 601 was a popular car at concours d’elegances. The body style “transformable electrique” (now known as the CC) in particular appealed to the public’s imagination.

The transformable electrique, or the Peugeot ‘Eclipse’, was born thanks to the meeting of three men: Darl’Mat, one of the most important Peugeot dealers, coachbuilder Marcel Pourtout and Georges Paulin, who was actually a dentist but also found his talent in designing of cars. It was Georges Paulin who entrusted the paper with an idea in 1933 to fold a metal roof completely into the trunk. He patented his invention and then went for coffee with Marcel Pourtout. Eventually, they enlisted their friend Darl’Mat to try out the concept on the new 601. The result was astonishing. The iconic Peugeot Eclipse was born.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/1934-peugeot-601-eclipse-the-first-automatic-retractable-hardtop-for-an-automobile/