The Russians Make The Best Truck In The Universe For $50K

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The SHERP is Alexei Garagashyan’s brilliant invention. It weighs just 2,866 pounds dry, so while it might only have a 44.3 horsepower 1.5 liter Kubota V1505 four-cylinder diesel linked to a five-speed manual, it will still do 28 mph on land, or 3.7 mph in water, depending on the wind. It will also crawl at up to 9.3 mph in first gear.

h/t: truckyeah

It will climb over obstacles as tall as 27.5 inches, swim with ease, turn like a tank and look awesome in any situation for only $49,000 worth of Rubles.





SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/dXtCJhAH9Ro/

The Russians Make The Best Truck In The Universe For $50K

1

The SHERP is Alexei Garagashyan’s brilliant invention. It weighs just 2,866 pounds dry, so while it might only have a 44.3 horsepower 1.5 liter Kubota V1505 four-cylinder diesel linked to a five-speed manual, it will still do 28 mph on land, or 3.7 mph in water, depending on the wind. It will also crawl at up to 9.3 mph in first gear.

h/t: truckyeah

It will climb over obstacles as tall as 27.5 inches, swim with ease, turn like a tank and look awesome in any situation for only $49,000 worth of Rubles.





SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/dXtCJhAH9Ro/

A Man Created A Bathroom Mirror That Looks Like The Future

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The ‘Internet of Things’ is a phrase people keep bringing up that references the real life trend toward a world where all your things have become working props in a science fiction movie.

h/t: cheezburger

Let’s be honest, so far this neat idea has mostly translated into putting a touchscreen on everything. That’s why Max Braun got crafty and made his own futuristic mirror using Google’s Android system. So far it automatically shows the weather, the time and the day’s headlines but he hopes to include more. He’s also made a diagram showing what makes the mirror tick.



SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/taqtOLNwHdE/

Quadcopter Crash, The Scary Part Is After The Crash

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According to Greg Johnson: “Once again I was able to lose my copter in the wind and crash it. The scary part is what happened after I crashed. GoPro was still running and look what happened while I was running around trying to find my copter.”

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/jGJRynuwuM8/

Australian Farmer Fights Erosion With A Patchwork Of Geometric Designs

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A South Australian farmer has transformed his land into a gigantic geometric patchwork in a bid to fight soil erosion. Brian Fischer created the patterns at Ashmore White Suffolk Stud, north of Adelaide, following recent bushfires.

h/t: theguardian

In the absence of any vegetation, he says the furrows prevent gusting winds from causing further damage. “The fires cooked everything,” he told 3AW radio, “but whichever way the wind blows it’s always at 90 degrees [to the furrows] so it can’t get started”.

The idea dates back to 1944 – if not earlier – when more than one million hectares of land were destroyed by a raging bushfire in Victoria. Fischer says the pattern took several days to plough but is saving him 15cm of topsoil.

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/oeMa52Y1TIA/

Historic Space Shuttle Mockup Stored in Downey, California

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Inspiration‘ was built in 1972 by North American Rockwell (now part of Boeing) at the company’s plant in Downey, California. Crafted mainly from wood and plastic, the 122 foot-long by 35 foot-tall model was used to fit-check payloads, instruments and other in-flight hardware that would ultimately be pressed into service on operational orbiters.

h/t: urbanghostsmedia


Photo: Columbia Memorial Space Center

With the flight programme underway and more orbiters rolling off the production line – the final one being Endeavour in 1992 as a replacement for Challenger, which was tragically destroyed on lift-off in 1986 – Space Shuttle Inspiration was retained by Rockwell at its Downey assembly plant, but was largely unknown to those unconnected with the NASA space programme.


Photo: Aaron Harvey

In addition to its ground test duties, the Space Shuttle mockup also doubled as a PR tool when government officials and astronauts visited the facility. But when the plant closed down in 1999 with the building that housed Inspiration was converted into a movie studio, the orphaned aerospace artifact was pushed to the side. Less its port wing and tail fin, which had been removed shortly after construction, Space Shuttle ‘Inspiration’ was disassembled and placed into storage at the historic site, where all of NASA’s orbiters had been built.


Photo: Aaron Harvey

That was until around 2012, when Industrial Realty Group (IRG) acquired 77 acres of the former North American Rockwell facility in Downey in a bid to build a shopping mall on the historic site. Demolition of Downey Studios began later that year and ‘Inspiration’ emerged from the shadows as plans were made for its preservation and display.


Photo: InSapphoWeTrust

The tent allowed visitors to see the Space Shuttle mockup – which for decades played an important role in the NASA programme – up close for the first time in Inspiration’s history. It was also around this time that the previously unnamed test article was christened – not to be confused with another full scale orbiter mockup called ‘Inspiration’, which is on display at the United States Astronaut Hall of Fame in Florida.


Photo: InSapphoWeTrust

According to the Long Beach Press Telegram, the city of Downey received a $3 million federal loan in 2013 in order to establish an ‘Inspiration Neighborhood Center’. But as of March 6, 2014 the Space Shuttle mockup was back in storage at the city’s maintenance yard.


Photo: InSapphoWeTrust

Also, read: “A Photographer Found An Abandoned Wooden Model Of Russian Buran Spacecraft” and “Man Noticed This Abandoned Hangar But Whats Inside Caught Him By Surprise

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/nttaMJNeQC0/

Photographer Roland Miller Has Created Fascinating Photos Of NASA’s Abandoned Launch Sites

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The Mercury, Gemini and the Apollo Missions of the late 1950s and 60s still remain one of NASA’s greatest achievements — one that enabled humans, for the first time in history, to leave the surface of the Earth for another heavenly body. This monumental task was made possible through the hard work and genius of thousands of engineers, and the incredible infrastructure they built along the coast of Florida. With the advent of reusable rockets, private space programs and a change in NASA’s goals, unfortunately, many of these facilities were abandoned and left to the elements. American photographer Roland Miller has spent 25 years documenting these buildings in his photographs before they rot and crumble to the ground. Indeed, Miller estimates that about half of the locales he shot have already disappeared since he started shooting.

V2 Launch Site with Hermes A-1 Rocket, Launch Complex 33 Gantry, White Sands Missile Range, NM, 2006. “One of the earliest launch complexes built. Used to test launch captured German V2 rockets. Many of the features in LC 33’s blockhouse made there way into other blockhouses at Cape Canaveral–like multiple panes of glass laminated together to allow for protected viewing of the launch from the blockhouse.

The project began in 1988 when Miller, a photography instructor at Brevard Community College, was contacted by an environmental engineer at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station who needed help disposing of old photographic chemicals at the facility. Hoping to snag the free stuff from the photo lab, Miller visited Launch Complex 19 of Gemini Program, and was immediately awestruck by the way it was slowly rusting away. Miller has been obsessed with space for as long as he could remember. His own dreams of becoming an astronaut were dashed to the ground by his but poor eyesight. Seeing the deteriorating buildings, Miller resolved photograph them while there was still time.

It took two years of haggling with NASA officials before he was finally allowed permission to visit the ruins. Since then he has visited 16 space launch sites, research facilities, and museums, in Virginia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Kansas, Utah, New Mexico, and California. Miler has now successfully raised over $25,000 through Kickstarter to publish a photography book titled “Abandoned in Place” which is scheduled to be published in January of 2016.

h/t: amusingplanet, wired

Wind Tunnel Test Chamber with Model, 7 X 10 Foot Wind Tunnel, NASA Langley Research Center, VA, 1997.

Horizontal Gantry from Base, Gemini Titan Complex 19, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 1991.

“This was the first abandoned launch pad I visited. It was 1988. I was amazed that the light bulbs were mostly intact 22 years after the last Gemini mission. The erector at Pad 19 was hinged at the base, and lowered before every launch. After the final launch, it was left horizontal.”

Shelter Dome, Rubber Room, Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center, FL, 1996.

“Adjoining the Rubber Room was a Shelter Dome room with the floor set on springs to isolate the occupants from whatever conflagration may be occurring above them as they seek shelter.”

Launch Ring Restored, Apollo Saturn Complex 34, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 2000.

“In 1998, the launch ring at Complex 34 was sandblasted and painted to protect it from weathering. I had been trying for years to capture the spiritual quality of this site. I made this photograph near sunset with the blue sky reflecting on the launch pedestal and the last pink rays of sunlight illuminating the ring and clouds behind.”

Liquid Fuel Tank Support, Apollo Saturn Complex 37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 1993.

“There were two of these fuel pressure spheres near the entrance to Launch Complex 37. One has been repurposed and is now used to support Delta IV rocket launches. The other sphere was removed.”

Mobile Service Tower Platforms, Atlas Launch Complex 36B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 2005.

“I photographed Atlas Launch Complex 36B while it was being decommissioned. The mobile service towers of Pads A and B were imploded in 2007. Launch Complex 36 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station sent Surveyor, Mariner, and Pioneer missions on their way to explore the Moon and the planets of our solar system.”

Saturn V F1 Center Engine, Saturn V Center, Kennedy Space Center, FL, 1997.

“I was asked, in 1997, to photograph the newly opened Saturn V Center, including access to a high-lift for vantage points like this view of the center Saturn V F1 engine.”

Telemetry Receivers, Strip Chart Recorders and Tape Recorders, Blockhouse, Redstone Launch Complex 26, Cape Canaveral, FL, 2000.

“A stop on one of the Kennedy Space Center bus tours. The blockhouse is often staffed by retired NASA employees who actually worked in the blockhouse and on the Redstone rocket. They explain the procedures and technology of the day.”

Launch Ring, Launch Complex 34, (Apollo Saturn) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

Blockhouse, Apollo Saturn Complex 37, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 1992.

“Many of these abandoned space launch and test facilities bring to mind other archeological sites. This blockhouse reminded me of a pyramid or ziggurat.”

Apollo Saturn F1 Engine Cluster, NASA Johnson Space Center, TX, 1996.

“I made this image laying on my back with my camera on my face in a light rain. I enjoy the visual reference to Nefertiti.”

Flooded Room Beneath Pad 19, Gemini Titan Launch Complex 19, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, 1992.

“This is an image of a large square girder in a flooded compartment beneath the launch pad. What I couldn’t have predicted were the swirling reflections of light in the water coming from openings in the roof. They looked like little galaxies.”

Fuel Tank, Lunar Module, Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center, KS, 2002.

“I photographed this fuel tank while it was in storage, attracted to the amazing colors the oxidation created.”

Gemini, Mercury, and Apollo Test Models, Spin Test Tunnel Office, NASA Langley Research Center, VA, 1997.

“I asked the staff if I could photograph these models. I was planning on photographing right where they were. When I returned from photographing the Spin Test Tunnel, the staff had set them on the counter showing off the scientific illustrations on the blackboard behind them — a wonderful background.”

Launch Control Room. Titan II ICBM Silo 395-C. Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

Apollo 1 Fire Commemorative Blockhouse Service. Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

Also, don’t miss “A Photographer Found An Abandoned Wooden Model Of Russian Buran Spacecraft” and “Man Noticed This Abandoned Hangar But Whats Inside Caught Him By Surprise

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/ipK7-LtU2nE/

This Designer Has Made A Flying Hoverboard That Actually Works

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We’ve all heard for much of our lives that hoverboards will exist…one day. Well, apparently that day has arrived, with the introduction of the ArcaBoard.

When designer Dumitru Popescu of ARCA Space Corporation was on a photo shoot for a different project, he was chatting with someone, when it was mentioned that it would be awesome to have a hoverboard to hover over the rough terrain.

Dumitru’s response, “oh yeah, that’s a simple task, of course we can do this.”

With the technology already possible, Dumitru set out to create a hoverboard. The result is an airframe that houses 36 electric-ducted fans that can create 272 horse power.

The first person to test the hoverboard was Elena Simona Popescu, the company’s Public Relations Manager.

Then, of course, it was time for Dumitru to try it.

“It worked!”

Unfortunately, the flight time is only 3 to 6 minutes, depending on the battery charge.

You can buy one if you want, but they’re kind of expensive, with a price tag of $19,900.

h/t: contemporist

Watch the video below to see it in action:

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/6luGID6HYc0/

The Personalized Datsun: 1976 280-Z Brochure

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This eight-page brochure illustrates how the 280-Z has grown into the role of Grand Tourer: “More comfort, more luxury, more overall performance with all the traditions of the 240-Z and 260-Z updated, embellished, refined.”

The new 2,753-cc SOHC straight-six engine sported Bosch L-Jetronic fuel injection and made 149 hp (170 hp by the old gross rating) and 163-lb.ft. of torque (177 gross), while the standard four-speed manual could be swapped for a three-speed automatic.

It’s interesting to remember that the 2+2 model was a true family-sized car, measuring a generous 185.4 inches in length over a 102.6-inch wheelbase, compared to the 280-Z’s 173.2- and 90.7-inch measurements. Neither represented a great bargain anymore, with prices ranging from $6,594 to $7,394, before adding options like air conditioning ($485); those MSRPs were the rough equivalent of today’s $27,500 and $30,840.

h/t: hemmings





SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/-IcgPxnR31A/

These New Maternity Beds Will Change Hospitals For Mothers Forever

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After giving birth, it’s natural for a mother to want to be close to her newborn, but this task isn’t always as simple as it seems. Since hospital cribs tend to be positioned several feet away from a patient’s bed, pain and exhaustion often prevent a mom from getting up to retrieve her child. This can make breastfeeding difficult and it can also take its toll on nurses who have to constantly transport babies back and forth between their cribs and mothers’ beds.

In the Netherlands, mothers at Gelderse Vallei Hospital can bond with their babies from the comfort of their bed. For moms who just delivered and need to stay at the hospital for an extended period of time, clip-on bassinets are attached to their cots.

“Mother and child are thus close together and can touch each other without the intervention of a nurse,” the hospital explains. “Breastfeeding is easier because the baby is nearby. Especially after a cesarean delivery, if the mother is not very mobile for a few days, the manger has great advantages.”

Although these new crib attachments can make a mother’s hospital stay more comfortable, precautions must be taken. While she’s sleeping, a mother could potentially roll over onto her child, which is why the baby should be watched or put in a separate crib while the mom is resting. It’s also important for a mother to move around after giving birth, so that blood clots don’t form in her legs. That’s why this type of crib shouldn’t be fully relied on, even though it can be beneficial.
h/t: mymodernmet, boredpanda, yahoo, bellybellybaby, geldersevallei

SOURCE: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/dyt/~3/rkSCJbTI2zo/