Travels: Winners & Merit Awards Of AAP Magazine’s Photo Contest

First Place Winner: Yulia Nevskaya, Russian Federation – $500 Cash Prize

The many mind-blowing entries come from talented photographers who traveled around the world.

Each month All About Photo offers the opportunity to dedicated and passionate artists to showcase their work in our printed edition “AAP Magazine”. For this 20th edition we were looking for travel photographs, near and far, to the edge of the earth and to the places perhaps known only to a few.

There’s a world out there to explore and each winning photographer shows us a glimpse of the diversity of our planet.

From Nomads in Northen Russia or Sahel, to a church in Ethiopia or wild landscapes in Australia, we virtually travel to the four corners of the earth. Kyrgyzstan, Soviet Union, Tibet, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Israel, Armenia, South Sudan, Benin, Bangladesh, Peru, The Arctic circle, Ethiopia, France, India, Greenland, Finland, Japan and the United States are amongst the countries you will be able to discover in the 20th edition of AAP Magazine.

More: AAP Magazine, Instagram h/t: 121clicks

Second Place Winner: Alain Schroeder, Belgium – $300 Cash Prize

Third Place Winner: Paul B Goode, United States – $200 Cash Prize

Merit Award: Larry Snider, United States

Merit Award: Johan Gerrits, Netherlands

Merit Award: Robi Chakraborty, United States

Merit Award: Nicola Ducati, Italy

Merit Award: Monica Testa, Italy

Merit Award: Antoine Buttafoghi, France

Merit Award: Sujon Adhikary, Bangladesh

Merit Award: France Leclerc, United States

Merit Award: Ly Hoang Long, Vietnam

Merit Award: Jordi Cohen, Spain

Merit Award: Matty Karp, Israel

Merit Award: Melissa Stewart, Australia

Merit Award: Ted & Nune, United States

Merit Award: Kimmo Sahakangas, United States

Merit Award: Jim Esposito, United States

Merit Award: Don Jacobson, United States

Merit Award: Barry Guthertz, United States

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/travels-winners-merit-awards-of-aap-magazines-photo-contest/

“Moments Around the World”: Amazing Cinematic Travel and Street Photography by Billy Dinh

Billy Dinh is a travel and street photographer based in New York City. Also an illustrator and painting, he accidentally got into photography when he bought his first camera with the intention of only capturing reference photos for his art work.

Inspired by street photography, Billy introduces a different perspective as he captures candid moments and places around New York City and different parts of the world. Billy incorporates his illustration background to bring to life a visual story with each photograph. In addition to photography, Billy enjoys bourbon and is forever searching for the best bowl of Ramen.

More: Billy Dinh, Instagram































































































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/moments-around-the-world-amazing-cinematic-travel-and-street-photography-by-billy-dinh/

Remember When Traveling by Train Was Wonderful in the 1950s

Before the start of Amtrak in 1971, the Sunset Limited was operated by the Southern Pacific Railroad. The Sunset Limited is the oldest named train in the United States, operating since November 1894 along the Sunset Route (though originally named the Sunset Express). The Sunset Route (originating in New Orleans) is the southernmost of the three gateways to the West Coast envisioned through the Pacific Railroad Acts. The other two embarked from Chicago and St. Louis.

More: SMU h/t: vintag.es

In addition, opened 20 years before the Panama Canal, the Sunset Route vastly shortened the time to reach the West Coast from the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, as New Orleans was already an established seaport for Atlantic shipping lines’ passengers, seeking to reach the US interior. The Sunset Limited allowed passengers to reach the West Coast in a few days, not weeks.

These amazing photos from SMU Libraries Digital Collections were taken by American photographer Robert Yarnall Richie that show the luxury of the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset Limited in 1950.
















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/remember-when-traveling-by-train-was-wonderful-in-the-1950s/

Once Upon A Time, You Could Ride a Train Right Through the Orange Groves in Southern California

“These cards seems to be part of an advertising campaign by the Southern California Tourist Agency. It probably isn’t, but it certainly highlights the attitude that people had about Southern California. Imagine, Easterners coming to Southern California for the first time and, as the train passes through the orange groves to get to Los Angeles, crowding the back platform of the last car to get a better look at the trees laden with fruit!

The post cards were published by the Western Publishing & Novelty Co. Los Angeles, Cal. The company existed in Southern California from 1932 until the 1970s. They were a publisher and distributer of California related tourist materials and postcards.”

More: About My Trains h/t: messynessychic





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/once-upon-a-time-you-could-ride-a-train-right-through-the-orange-groves-in-southern-california/

Breakfast in Bed: Extraordinary Color Photographs Revealed the First Class of Air France in the 1950s

Air France, in full Compagnie Nationale Air France, French international airline originally formed in 1933 and today serving all parts of the globe. With British Airways, it was the first to fly the supersonic Concorde. Headquarters are in Paris.

h/t: vintag.es

By 1948 Air France operated 130 aircraft, one of the largest fleets in the world. Between 1947 and 1965 the airline operated Lockheed Constellations on passenger and cargo services worldwide.

During the mid-1950s it also operated the Vickers Viscount turboprop, with twelve entering services between May 1953 and August 1954 on the European routes. On September 26, 1953, the government instructed Air France to share long-distance routes with new private airlines. This was followed by the Ministry of Public Works and Transport’s imposition of an accord on Air France, Aigle Azur, TAI and UAT, under which some routes to Africa, Asia and the Pacific region were transferred to private carriers.

In 1957, Eugene Louis Kammerman (1920–1961) took a series of photographs for an advertising campaign for Air France. Photographer for the United States Army, he married a French woman and decided to stay in France. A reporter for the Saturday Evening Post, he collaborated to the young newspaper L’Express, then too “poor” to pay him. He started to work on advertising campaigns and did reportages on the major fashion houses, his images were published in magazines such as Elle, Paris Match and Life…




















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/breakfast-in-bed-extraordinary-color-photographs-revealed-the-first-class-of-air-france-in-the-1950s/

A Journey Through America in the 1970s and 1980s

Cannon Beach, Oregon, 1971

Photographer Paul McDonough takes on a journey through America in the 1970s and 1980s. The New York-based photographer shows us people on the beach, walking along sidewalks, sitting, flirting and hanging out.

More: HEADED WEST by Paul McDonough h/t: flashbak

Santa Monica, California, 1979

After leaving Portsmouth, New Hampshire, the city where he was born and raised, Paul McDonough went first to Cambridge, Massachussets and then New York City, where his life as a photographer began in earnest. And while he never tired of New York’s kaleidoscopic street scene, he felt the tug of the west, and of the sprawling, dreaming country that lay between the two coasts.

Toronto, Canada, 1972

From the 1960’s through the 1990’s McDonough made numerous photographic treks, seeking to capture people, animals, architecture, land-and-cityscapes — in short, the American life, pre-internet, pre-cell phone, that was thrumming all around him.

Los Angeles, 1977

As Hilton Als of the New Yorker so aptly put it: “McDonough’s project, it seems to me, is a kind of record of his life as a walker… his pictures are a map of experience, of his consciousness. He is a thinker who looks through the eye of his camera to distinguish truth from reality.”

Texas, 1977

Venice Beach, California, 1979

Toronto, Canada, 1972

Portland, Oregon, 1973

New Orleans, 1981

California

New Orleans, 1976

Syracuse (NY State Fair)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/a-journey-through-america-in-the-1970s-and-1980s/

Fantastic Photos of the USSR in the 1950s You Haven’t Seen

Well, maybe you have seen some of these photos, however you are more likely to see the majority of them for the first time. All of them are colored and they literally help you dig into that special atmosphere. Amazing feeling of a time journey – 60-70 years into the past.

These photos were taken by Martin Manhoff – an American assistant military attache in the USSR in the period 1952-1954. His photo archive was publicised only in 2016 – mainly thanks to the efforts of a historian and publicist Douglas Smith.

h/t: englishrussia




















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/fantastic-photos-of-the-ussr-in-the-1950s-you-havent-seen/

Russian Photographer Captured Wonderful Photos While Visiting The Extraordinary Socotra Island

According to Kristina Makeeva: “Socotra is a Yemeni-owned island located in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Somalia. It is one of the world’s most isolated islands of continental (non-volcanic) origin; it separated from Africa about 6 million years ago.

More: Kristina Makeeva, Instagram, Facebook h/t: boredpanda

The long isolation of Socotra and intense heat and drought, hurricane seasonal monsoons from May to September, noticeable climate softening in the winter months, as well as special climatic conditions in mountainous regions have formed a unique flora and fauna on the island. For this reason, Socotra is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. The main threat to Socotra’s nature is represented by alien species, climate change, and anthropogenic impact (it is known that goats eat young shoots of bottle trees and the dragon tree, which harms the endemics of Socotra).

The symbol of Socotra is Dracaena cinnabari (Dragon tree), which looks like a huge mushroom or umbrella. From the bark of this tree, when cut, red sap begins to flow, which quickly solidifies. Since ancient times, local residents have used the resulting crimson gum for medical, veterinary, and cosmetic purposes. Locals say that the juice of Dracaena cinnabari can stop bleeding during menstruation in women.

To watch more videos about this incredible place, you may visit my Instagram. Most of all, I liked the kilometer-long dunes on the shores of the azure Indian Ocean, puffer fish, and bottle trees blooming like sakura.”






























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/russian-photographer-captured-wonderful-photos-while-visiting-the-extraordinary-socotra-island/

It’s Mysterious Circles in Japan: Drone Captures Circles of Trees


The Japan Agriculture

Thanks to drones, the Miyazaki prefectural government captures a pair of mysterious circles made of cedar trees at its forest management site.

Miyazaki prefecture is well-known for Japan’s biggest output of cedar trees and the Nichinan city’s forest is populated by local Obi-sugi cedar trees.

So, the mysterious cycles are in fact the results of a 45-year experimental forestry program by scientists, who planted the local cedar trees to understand the effects of forest density of tree growth, explain prefectural government officials.

The circle of cedar tress has now 69 meters (266 ft) in diameter, and there are 12 rounds of sequence in circles.


FNN


Google Earth


Starck


DOP

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/its-mysterious-circles-in-japan-drone-captures-circles-of-trees/

Inside the Gruesome Mummies of Guanajuato in the 1950s

The Mummies of Guanajuato are a number of naturally mummified bodies interred during a cholera outbreak around Guanajuato, Mexico in 1833.

h/t: vintag.es

The human bodies appear to have been disinterred between 1870 and 1958. During that time, a local tax was in place requiring a fee to be paid for “perpetual” burial. Some bodies for which the tax was not paid were disinterred, and some—apparently those in the best condition—were stored in a nearby building. The climate of Guanajuato provides an environment which can lead to a type of natural mummification, although scientific studies later revealed that some bodies had been at least partially embalmed.

By the 1900s the mummies began attracting tourists. Cemetery workers began charging people a few pesos to enter the building where bones and mummies were stored.

This place was subsequently turned into a museum called El Museo de las Momias (“The Museum of the Mummies”) in 1969. As of 2007, 59 mummies were on display, of a collection that totals 111.












SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/inside-the-gruesome-mummies-of-guanajuato-in-the-1950s/