This Hotel In The Arctic Circle Will Be Unlike Any Other

It’s one thing to build a hotel on the foot of a glacier just above the Arctic circle, it’s another thing entirely to also make it energy positive. But that’s precisely what award-winning Norwegian architects Snøhetta have been tasked with creating. In collaboration with Asplan Viak and Skanska and the team at Arctic Adventures of Norway – they’ve created ‘Svart&

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/09/this-hotel-in-the-arctic-circle-will-be-unlike-any-other/

Great Tomato Fight 2018

Rodrigo Jimenez/EPA/EFE As every year on the last Wednesday of August, thousands of people visit the small village of Bunol to attend the Tomatina, a battle in which tons of ripe tomatoes are used as weapons. This year, a total of 145 tons of ripe tomatoes will be thrown between more than 22,000 participants. Rodrigo Jimenez/EPA/EFE Rodrigo Jimenez/EPA/EFE Rodrigo Jimenez/EPA/EFE Rodrigo...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/09/great-tomato-fight-2018/

“Moon Level Luxury At Down To Earth Rates”: Al Stovall’s 1960s Space Age Lodge In Anaheim, California

The Space Age Lodge in Anaheim, California, housed its first cadets in 1965. One of five cosmic-themed motels created by industrialist Al Stovall, the Space Age Lodge was partnered with the Inn of Tomorrow, the Cosmic Inn, The Galaxy, another Space Age Lodge (all in Anaheim) and the Space Age in Gila Bend, Arizona. This was “MOON LEVEL LUXURY” at “DOWN TO EARTH RATES.” Let’s travel back in time to...

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SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/08/moon-level-luxury-at-down-to-earth-rates-al-stovalls-1960s-space-age-lodge-in-anaheim-california/

Speaking American: Some Easy Reading On Cultural Language Differential In The US

From the creator of the New York Times dialect quiz that ignited conversations about how and why we say the words we say, a stunning and delightful exploration of American language.

Did you know that your answers to just a handful of questions can reveal where you grew up? In December 2013, Josh Katz released an interactive dialect quiz in the New York Times that became the most viewed page in the paper’s history. Now a graphics editor, Katz harnessed the overwhelming response to that quiz to create Speaking American, an extraordinary and beautiful tour through the American vernacular.

How do you pronounce “pecan”? What do you call a long sandwich with varieties of meats and cheeses? Do you cut the grass or mow the lawn?

The answers to these questions—and the distinctions they reveal about who says what and where they say it—are not just the ultimate in cocktail party fodder; they are also windows into the history of our nation, our regions, and our language. On page after page, readers will be fascinated and charmed by these stunning maps of how Americans speak as they gain new insights into our language and ourselves.

More: Amazon







SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/07/speaking-american-some-easy-reading-on-cultural-language-differential-in-the-us/

Volcano Eruption In Guatemala Leaves Behind Ghost Town


Carlos Jasso/Reuters

There was no time to eat. Sunday family lunches were interrupted, the food left on the table. Children abandoned toys, and clothes still hung on lines in backyards. Animals died petrified. Guatemalan authorities reacted slowly to signs of the Fuego volcano’s impending eruption on June 3, contributing to one of the most tragic natural disasters in recent Guatemalan history.

The volcano rumbled to life early that Sunday. By midday, it was spewing ash in smoking columns miles high that then fell, dusting a wide swath of the Central American country. But with the mountain’s rumbles and the first ash showers, many villagers made a fatal bet to stay put, gambling that luck that had protected them for decades would hold once again. In the afternoon things took a turn for the worse.

Tons of ash propelled by scalding, toxic gases poured down Fuego’s flanks. By the time most families in the worst-hit hamlets of El Rodeo and San Miguel de Los Lotes knew what was happening, they only had time to run, if that. At least 110 people have died and close to 200 are thought buried under the rubble in the hamlet on the fertile lower slopes of the volcano.


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The post Volcano Eruption In Guatemala Leaves Behind Ghost Town appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/06/volcano-eruption-in-guatemala-leaves-behind-ghost-town/

“The Last Days Of Martinique”: Rare Portraits Of Martinique Residents Before The Deadly Volcano Eruption In 1902

Portraits of men and women from Martinique through a collection of old postcards.

Like most of the Lesser Antilles, Martinique was built by volcanoes. It’s part of an active island arc that traces the boundary where the oceanic crust of the North American Plate subducts beneath the Caribbean Plate, forming a lush, perforated barrier between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean.

h/t: earthmagazine, allthatsinteresting

One of these volcanoes, Mount Pelée, sat just 7 kilometers from St. Pierre and soared almost 1,400 meters above the city. Its smooth, verdant slopes lumbered down to the sea, cut in places by deep, raw gashes. Its summit crater drew adventurous hikers who occasionally caught whiffs of putrid gases. But, as far as the residents of St. Pierre knew, Mount Pelée was a gentle giant. The volcano had creaked and grunted back in 1792, and had showered the northern lobe of Martinique with fine ash once in 1851. But after a few more coughs and some minor mudslides, Pelée fell quiet for half a century.

The eruption of Mount Pelee was the worst volcanic disaster of the 20th century. In less than a minute, the volcano eviscerated the entire city of St. Pierre, the biggest city in the Caribbean island of Martinique. More than 30,000 people died — and only three made it out alive.

In the days leading up to May 8, 1902, the volcano had been smoking and emitting vapors for days before the eruption, but locals had seen it do this before. Most thought there was no reason to worry — until a cloud of ash descended onto the city.

As it then became likely that Mount Pelee would soon erupt, panic quickly grew in the city below. Some fled, running as far out of the city as they could before the volcano could erupt.

Then, on May 8, as the people below celebrated the feast of Christ’s ascension into heaven, a gigantic mushroom cloud filled the sky. A cloud of ash surged over the city, glowing with an incredible heat of nearly 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. In less than 60 seconds, the entire city was destroyed.

People burned to death on the spot, some so quickly that they didn’t even feel a second of pain. Others felt their blood start to boil and tried to run, collapsing under pumice and hot ash with twisted, agonizing screams permanently held on their faces. The city itself burst into flames and, across Martinique, a soft snow of white ash fell from the sky.

There were only three survivors. A ten-year-old girl named Havivra Da Ifrile managed to get into a boat and row to shelter inside of a cave until rescue came. Léon Compère-Léandre, after seeing the people around him falling down dead, leaped into the boiling hot ocean. His whole body was covered in burns, but he managed to make it out alive.

The other survivor was a violent criminal, Louis-Auguste Cyparis. He was locked in solitary confinement in a stone cell when the volcano erupted, which, by chance, put him in the safest place in the city. As the city burned, Cyparis waited, his body covered in burns, for rescue. He spent four days in a burning city before the city around him cooled down enough for a relief team to come in and pull him out alive.

The rest, though, were not so lucky. Every other person in St. Pierre died in an instant, wiped out in a blanket of ash and volcanic pumice — victims of the worst volcanic disaster of the 20th century.










The post “The Last Days Of Martinique”: Rare Portraits Of Martinique Residents Before The Deadly Volcano Eruption In 1902 appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/05/the-last-days-of-martinique-rare-portraits-of-martinique-residents-before-the-deadly-volcano-eruption-in-1902/

Instagram Duo Travels The World Snapping Locations From Their Favourite Series

As we all know, binge-watching series is great. But actually using your favourite shows as an excuse to travel the world? Even better. For a little while now, Finnish pals Tiia Ohman and Satu Walden (previuosly) have been setting off from their native Helsinki in hunt of the most striking locations from the biggest TV shows out there.

Forming travel blogger duo Fangirl Quest, Tiia and Satu have even come up with their own special way to capture their far flung adventures. For each new site, they bring along a tablet with a screenshot of a particular scene and line up the images with the background in real life – a process they refer to as ‘scene-framing’.

“We took a few photos during a road trip in the UK”, the pair explained of the project’s origins. “We then posted them online and got almost 60,000 shares in just a couple of weeks.”

More: Instagram h/t: konbini





































The post Instagram Duo Travels The World Snapping Locations From Their Favourite Series appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/05/instagram-duo-travels-the-world-snapping-locations-from-their-favourite-series/

The Unexpected Beauty Of China’s Bicycle Graveyards

For the past 18 months many cities in China have been flooded by millions of dockless share bikes. Those that block pavements or apartment entrances have been removed by authorities to vast storage areas. Viewed from afar they create compelling and mysterious patterns – but also represent waste on an enormous scale.


Feature China/Barcroft Images
An aerial view of the rental bikes detained by the local urban administration authority of Luyang district in Hefei. Given that the shared bikes have several users a day – some of them inexperienced riders who swerve into traffic – they are often damaged, vandalised, or abandoned

h/t: theguardian


Costfoto / Barcroft Images
Share bikes found illegally parked in an enclosure in Nanning. Dubbed ‘ Uber for bikes’, the customers rent bikes using their smartphones and can drop them off anywhere


Imaginechina/Rex/Shutterstock
Tens of thousands of abandoned share bikes piled up at a car park in Nanjing. The bikes are crammed into the 82-metre-long and 60-metre-wide parking space reaching a height of nearly two metres


Imaginechina/REX/Shutterstock
Discarded Bluegogo share bicycles crammed into a car park in Beijing. Bluegogo, China’s third largest bike-sharing company, went bankrupt last year


Pacific Press / Barcroft Images
Numerous abandoned share bikes in Wuhan


VCG via Getty Images
Piles of abandoned share bikes in Shanghai


Wu Hong/EPA
Thousands of bicycles sit near a flyover in Beijing’s Tongzhou district


Aly Song/Reuters
Abandoned bicycles from various bike-sharing services in Shanghai

The post The Unexpected Beauty Of China’s Bicycle Graveyards appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/05/the-unexpected-beauty-of-chinas-bicycle-graveyards/

Photographer Combines Movie Scenes With The Actual Places In A Single Frame

According to an artist Musa Bektash: “Ahoj everyone from Prague, Czechia. My name is Musa, living in the beautiful city of Prague. While I’m living here realized that a lot of movies shooting here, so I’ve decided to create photo project.
The city has an amazing architecture for historical movies and comparing the other European cities it’s cheaper and beneficial to make a movie in Prague. Plus Barrandov Studio is a great place for sci-fiction movies with tunnels, underground metro lines…”

More: Instagram h/t: boredpanda






















The post Photographer Combines Movie Scenes With The Actual Places In A Single Frame appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/04/photographer-combines-movie-scenes-with-the-actual-places-in-a-single-frame/

Rare And Amazing Photographs From The First Australasian Antarctic Expedition Between 1911-14


Cavern carved by the sea in an ice wall near Commonwealth Bay, circa 1912

In 1911 a group of scientists and adventurers left Hobart under the leadership of Dr Douglas Mawson. They were bound for Macquarie Island and the then unknown parts of Antarctica.

The scientists of the expedition produced information that later made an major contribution to knowledge of the region. The exploration of new lands established precedence to claims, formalised in 1936 as the Australian Antarctic Territory. Although James Francis (Frank) Hurley was the official photographer to the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, other members of the expedition also took photographs.

h/t: vintag.es


F. Bickerton looking out over seas near Commonwealth Bay, circa 1912


Wreck of the ‘Gratitude’, Macquarie Island, 1911


Mushroom ice formation, 1912


A radiant turret lit by the midsummer midnight sun, circa 1912


Huskies pulling sledge, circa 1912


Hamilton hand-netting for macro-plankton from Aurora, circa 1912


Arthur Sawyer and sea elephant pup, circa 1912


Skeleton of sea-elephant and Harold Hamilton, circa 1912


Australian Antarctic Expedition members in the kitchen, circa 1912


Wild and Watson in sleeping bag tent on sledge journey, circa 1912


Blizzard, the pup in Antarctica, circa 1912


Ice cased Adelie penguins after a blizzard at Cape Denison, circa 1912


Frozen Adelie, Antarctica, circa 1912


Shags defending nest, Macquarie Island, circa 1912


Basilisk and Ginger at Main Base, circa 1912


Ice mask, C.T. Madigan, circa 1912


Young sea-elephants on the beach, Macquarie Ilsand, Antarctica, 1911-1914


Female sea-elephant, Macquarie island, Antarctica, 1911-1914


King penguins, Antarctica, 1911-1914


Victoria penguin, Antarctica, 1911-1914


Weddell seal, Shackleton Ice Shelf, Antarctica, 1911-1914


Winter quarters, Queen Mary Land winter, 1911-1914


A dreamy Venice in seal-land, 1911-1914


Sclater penguin, 1911-1912


In full sledging gear on the plateau, 1911-1914


Photograph from the Expedition [group portrait], 1911-1914


The Aurora seen from within a cavern of the Mertz Glacier Tongue, Commonwealth Bay, Dec. 1913


Cape Denison during a blizzard, crampons had to be worn on boots and ice-axes used, even so progress was very difficult and could be perilous

The post Rare And Amazing Photographs From The First Australasian Antarctic Expedition Between 1911-14 appeared first on Design You Trust.

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2018/04/rare-and-amazing-photographs-from-the-first-australasian-antarctic-expedition-between-1911-14/