Sunken Forest In Kazakhstan Hides The Puzzling Story

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Lake Kaindy is the 400 meters long (1300 ft.) lake located in Kazakhstan’s Tian Shan Mountains. Would look like a usual lake, however, dried out treetops, swelling from crystal water, testify the puzzling story this lake is hiding. To find out what has happened here, we had to go back in 1911.

In 1911, Kazakhstan was hit by Kebin, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake, which triggered massive landslides and caused vast shifts in geological structures around this region. In the location of the former forest, large landslides blocked gorge and formed a natural dam that suspended rainwater coming from the mountains and thus created the Lake Kaindy.




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SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/sunken-forest-in-kazakhstan-hides-the-puzzling-story/

KLM Airlines Transformed An Airplane Into An Apartment, And It’s Beautiful

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By now, almost everyone has spent a bit of time browsing AirBNB. You may not always be able to get away and plan a holiday because it’s not the right time of year, or you have too much work, but just browsing the site can be a whole ton of fun. There are often many vibrant and creative spaces to choose from, and some are just so impressive, beautiful, and eclectic that we just have to share them with you.

From out of the Netherlands comes a converted and spacious airplane apartment courtesy of KLM Airlines. Unfortunately, this was only temporary and was for a contest (and publicity). However, one can still appreciate the beauty and creativity involved in this unique space.

It’s stylish with a spacious cabin offering a feel far closer to a chic European apartment rather than a modern flying machine.






Via Marvelous

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/klm-airlines-transformed-an-airplane-into-an-apartment-and-its-beautiful/

Living on a Volcano

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The Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, spews smoke as seen from El Pedregal, Ecuador, October 22, 2015. Ecuadorian authorities are monitoring activity at Cotopaxi volcano, which prompted Ecuador’s President Rafael Correa to maintain a yellow alert for eruptions as bursts of ash keep spewing from the snow-encircled crater of the volcano and falling in gusts on residential communities. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Ines Changoluisa poses for a picture in the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi Volcano (seen in the background, R), one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


The Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, spews smoke as seen from El Pedregal, Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Ines Changoluisa milks her cows in the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi Volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


The Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, spews smoke as seen from El Pedregal, Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Locals harvest mortinios (blueberries) at the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Locals harvest mortinios (blueberries) at the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Locals harvest mortinios (blueberries) at the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


The Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, spews smoke as seen from El Pedregal, Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Locals harvest mortinios (blueberries) at the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Ines Changoluisa milks her cow in the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi Volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal, in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


Ines Changoluisa milks her cow in the northern outskirts of the Cotopaxi Volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, at El Pedregal in Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)


The Cotopaxi volcano, one of the world’s highest active volcanoes, spews smoke as seen from El Pedregal, Ecuador, October 22, 2015. (Photo by Guillermo Granja/Reuters)

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/living-on-a-volcano/

From Patagonia to the World!

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Sergio Miranda, a photographer from Patagonia Argentina, based in Middle East, travels the world and exhibits his view through his Instagram account.








Follow him @ Instagram and His BLOG

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/from-patagonia-to-the-world/

Back to the Future Day

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Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12, customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II”, and that will be part of a Lyft promotion, in New York October 21, 2015. Today marks the day that the movie’s main character, Marty McFly, travelled to the future in the 1989 “Back to the Future” sequel. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Dom Artale parks a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Dom Artale parks a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future II” in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


Pedestrians stop to look at and photograph a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


A worker walks past a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


A detail is pictured inside of a DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 customized to look identical to the car used in the film “Back to the Future Part II” and that will be part of a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


A DeLorean Motor Company DMC-12 with vanity plates related to the film “Back to the Future Part II” takes part in a Lyft promotion in New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters)


DeLorean, remodeled similar to the “Back to the Future Part II” time machine, that runs on bioethanol fuel made from old clothes, is driven by retired Japanese professional baseball player Takeshi Yamasaki, right, as retired baseball player Masa Yamamoto smiles during a special celebration event organized by NBC Universal Entertainment Japan to mark the 30th anniversary of the sci-fi film’s debut, in Tokyo Wednesday, October 21, 2015. The celebration of the so-called “Back to the Future” Day on Wednesday marks the date – October 21, 2015 – that the characters Marty McFly, Emmett “Doc” Brown and Jennifer Parker famously journeyed by the vehicle from 1985 to 2015 in the film trilogy’s second installment in 1989. Unlike a trash-fueled DeLorean in the film, the car shown in the event was rebumped by its owner Michihiko Iwamoto, CEO of Japan Environmental Planning (JEPLAN) by using recycling technologies developed by his own company and actually runs on regular gas combined with several percent of bioethanol made from old clothes no longer worn. (Photo by Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo News via AP Photo)


DeLorean, remodeled similar to the “Back to the Future Part II” time machine, that runs on bioethanol fuel made from old clothes, is shown to fans during a special celebration event organized by NBC Universal Entertainment Japan to mark the 30th anniversary of the sci-fi film’s debut, in Tokyo Wednesday, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Ayaka Aizawa/Kyodo News via AP Photo)


Toby Fulp, 38, dresses as a character from the film “Back to the Future Part II” outside the Burger King featured in the movie, in Los Angeles, California, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)


Noah Shulman poses for a photo dressed as Marty McFly outside the “Back to the Future” 30th anniversary screening in Manhattan, New York, October 21, 2015. In the 1989 movie, main character Marty McFly traveled to the future to October 21, 2015. (Photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters)


People portraying characters from the film “Back to the Future Part II” stand outside the Burger King featured in the movie, in Los Angeles, California, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)


The dashboard of a replica DeLorean car from the film “Back to the Future Part II” is seen outside the Burger King featured in the movie, in Los Angeles, California, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)


Michael Sciaraffo of Brooklyn, dressed as Marty McFly, takes a selfie with NYPD and the DeLorean outside the “Back to the Future” 30th anniversary screening in Manhattan, New York, October 21, 2015. (Photo by Andrew Kelly/Reuters)

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/back-to-the-future-day/

The Incredible Photos of Abandoned Temples in Cambodia

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These pictures show the beautiful ruins of abandoned temples. The incredible shots, taken at temples in Angkor, Cambodia, show the striking yet haunting temples as they crumble to ruins. While they may have lost some of their former glory, the stunning temples show the beauty of the Cambodian landscape through the historic architecture. The breathtaking range of temples includes the Ta Prohm temple, which was made famous in one of the Tomb Raider films, starring Angelina Jolie, and the amazing carvings of Banteay Srei, considered the most beautiful of all temples, where the carvings are among the most intricate in the world.


The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb raider film. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Angkor Wat before the storm. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Sun rises over the 5 towers of Angkor. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Ta Prohm temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb Raider film. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


One of the 5 gates of Angkor Thom. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb Raider film. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


A pair of the over 3000 Apsaras (heavenly dancing girls from Hindu mythology) seen at the end of a long corridor. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Bayon temple is known for its many smiling faces. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Angor Kat. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


A shrine in the Ta Prohm temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Wall carvings in the Banteay Srei temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


The well known Ta Prohm temple, made famous in the Tomb Raider film. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Bayon temple is known for its many smiling faces. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Endless corridors of Preah Khan, one of the largest complexes of Angkor. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Exterior of the Bayon Temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


Exterior of the Bayon Temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


A stray dog roams the ruins of a temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


One of the four pools of the gallery of a thousand buddhas, located within the temple grounds. The buddhas no longer remain, as most were removed and others stolen. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)


The Bayon Temple. (Photo by Alex Teuscher/Caters News)

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/the-incredible-photos-of-abandoned-temples-in-cambodia/

A Brief Snapshot of What the World Is Actually Eating for Breakfast

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ENGLAND: The typical breakfast includes eggs, sausage, bacon, beans, and mushrooms.


CHINA: Traditional breakfasts vary based on the region, but dim sum, small plates of food prepared in a variety of ways, is popular.


AUSTRALIA: The typical breakfast consists of cold cereal and toast with vegemite.


BRAZIL: Expect to find ham, cheeses, and bread, served with coffee and milk.


SWITZERLAND: The Swiss like to start their day with Birchermüesli: raw oats and grains topped with dried and / or fresh fruit and served in milk or yogurt.


PAKISTAN: Pakistanis enjoy heartier meaty breakfasts, like Nihari, a stew made with beef sirloin and / or shank pieces.


COLOMBIA: A traditional breakfast in Bogota is changua, a milk, scallion, and egg soup.


INDONESIA: Nasi goreng is commonly eaten in Indonesia for breakfast. The meals consists of a fried egg and fried rice, and sometimes meat or seafood as well.


GERMANY: A typical breakfast is made up of cold meats, including sausages, local cheeses, and fresh baked bread.


CUBA: The typical breakfast is cafe con leche — coffee with milk — served with a tostada, which is sliced bread that is buttered and grilled. The bread is used to dunk into the coffee.


THE PHILIPPINES: Pandesal — a bread roll made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar, and salt — is a common breakfast food in the Philippines. The rolls are often dipped in coffee with milk.


POLAND: Similar to a German breakfast, a traditional breakfast in Poland consists of bread rolls served with an array of savory and sweet toppings such as meat, sausage, cheese, butter, jam, and chocolate spread.


INDIA: Idli wada is a traditional breakfast in the southern part of the country. Idli is a cake made with fermented black lentils and rice, and served with chutney and sambar.


ITALY: Many Italians begin their day with a cappuccino and hard roll or biscotti.


JAPAN: Traditional breakfast includes miso soup, steamed white rice, and Japanese pickles.


MOROCCO: Breakfast usually consists of breads with jam, and cheese or butter.


SCOTLAND: Simple but hearty, a good Scottish breakfast is often a bowl of porridge.


NIGERIA: With a variety of ethnic groups in the country, there are many traditional breakfast items. One of them is moi moi, a ground bean paste that is wrapped in leaves and steamed.


KOREA: Comparable to a rolled up omelette, Korean egg rolls can be made a variety of ways: sometimes with vegetables and sometimes with meat.


PORTUGAL: A standard breakfast includes stuffed croissants or bread with jam or cheese, eaten with coffee.


RUSSIA: Traditional breakfast is sirniki, or baked farmers cheese pancakes, and hot oatmeal. Rye bread is another staple.


MEXICO: Mexican comfort food at its finest, chilaquiles are totopos (similar to tortilla chips) submerged in a spicy sauce with a fried egg and various toppings such as avocado.


TURKEY: A traditional breakfast consists of bread, cheese, butter, olives, eggs, tomatoes, cucumbers, jam, honey, and kaymak. It can also include sucuk, a spicy Turkish sausage, and Turkish tea.


UNITED STATES: Breakfast foods vary widely from place to place, but typical options include eggs, pancakes, bacon, or cereal.


GUYANA: A typical breakfast in Guyana is bake and saltfish. Saltfish is whitefish preserved in salt, and bake is bread dough, fried.


FRANCE: A French breakfast includestea, coffee, juice, or hot chocolate, with bread and butter or pastries.


ISRAEL: A popular Israeli breakfast dish is shakshuka: eggs cooked in a spicy tomato sauce served with pita on the side for dipping.

Also, do not miss to taste the “50 of the World’s Best Breakfasts“!

Via cavemancircus.com

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/a-brief-snapshot-of-what-the-world-is-actually-eating-for-breakfast/

A Brief Snapshot of What the World Is Actually Eating for Breakfast

1


ENGLAND: The typical breakfast includes eggs, sausage, bacon, beans, and mushrooms.


CHINA: Traditional breakfasts vary based on the region, but dim sum, small plates of food prepared in a variety of ways, is popular.


AUSTRALIA: The typical breakfast consists of cold cereal and toast with vegemite.


BRAZIL: Expect to find ham, cheeses, and bread, served with coffee and milk.


SWITZERLAND: The Swiss like to start their day with Birchermüesli: raw oats and grains topped with dried and / or fresh fruit and served in milk or yogurt.


PAKISTAN: Pakistanis enjoy heartier meaty breakfasts, like Nihari, a stew made with beef sirloin and / or shank pieces.


COLOMBIA: A traditional breakfast in Bogota is changua, a milk, scallion, and egg soup.


INDONESIA: Nasi goreng is commonly eaten in Indonesia for breakfast. The meals consists of a fried egg and fried rice, and sometimes meat or seafood as well.


GERMANY: A typical breakfast is made up of cold meats, including sausages, local cheeses, and fresh baked bread.


CUBA: The typical breakfast is cafe con leche — coffee with milk — served with a tostada, which is sliced bread that is buttered and grilled. The bread is used to dunk into the coffee.


THE PHILIPPINES: Pandesal — a bread roll made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar, and salt — is a common breakfast food in the Philippines. The rolls are often dipped in coffee with milk.


POLAND: Similar to a German breakfast, a traditional breakfast in Poland consists of bread rolls served with an array of savory and sweet toppings such as meat, sausage, cheese, butter, jam, and chocolate spread.


INDIA: Idli wada is a traditional breakfast in the southern part of the country. Idli is a cake made with fermented black lentils and rice, and served with chutney and sambar.


ITALY: Many Italians begin their day with a cappuccino and hard roll or biscotti.


JAPAN: Traditional breakfast includes miso soup, steamed white rice, and Japanese pickles.


MOROCCO: Breakfast usually consists of breads with jam, and cheese or butter.


SCOTLAND: Simple but hearty, a good Scottish breakfast is often a bowl of porridge.


NIGERIA: With a variety of ethnic groups in the country, there are many traditional breakfast items. One of them is moi moi, a ground bean paste that is wrapped in leaves and steamed.


KOREA: Comparable to a rolled up omelette, Korean egg rolls can be made a variety of ways: sometimes with vegetables and sometimes with meat.


PORTUGAL: A standard breakfast includes stuffed croissants or bread with jam or cheese, eaten with coffee.


RUSSIA: Traditional breakfast is sirniki, or baked farmers cheese pancakes, and hot oatmeal. Rye bread is another staple.


MEXICO: Mexican comfort food at its finest, chilaquiles are totopos (similar to tortilla chips) submerged in a spicy sauce with a fried egg and various toppings such as avocado.


TURKEY: A traditional breakfast consists of bread, cheese, butter, olives, eggs, tomatoes, cucumbers, jam, honey, and kaymak. It can also include sucuk, a spicy Turkish sausage, and Turkish tea.


UNITED STATES: Breakfast foods vary widely from place to place, but typical options include eggs, pancakes, bacon, or cereal.


GUYANA: A typical breakfast in Guyana is bake and saltfish. Saltfish is whitefish preserved in salt, and bake is bread dough, fried.


FRANCE: A French breakfast includestea, coffee, juice, or hot chocolate, with bread and butter or pastries.


ISRAEL: A popular Israeli breakfast dish is shakshuka: eggs cooked in a spicy tomato sauce served with pita on the side for dipping.

Also, do not miss to taste the “50 of the World’s Best Breakfasts“!

Via cavemancircus.com

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/a-brief-snapshot-of-what-the-world-is-actually-eating-for-breakfast/

Nomadic Couple Built a Stylish Trailer Home for $50,000

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Like many people, Brian and Joni Buzarde wanted to own a home, but they didn’t want to be tied to one particular location. Their solution for housing mobility was an unconventional yet practical one—they built a dwelling that would travel with them. The couple’s trailer, nicknamed Woody, was designed and constructed by Brian and Joni, a true DIY project from beginning to end.

At the time Woody was built, Brian was a recent architecture school graduate and used his education to plan the 236-square-foot cabin. The couple then started the construction process by purchasing a 26-foot-long flatbed chassis and bolting on walls made from structural, insulated panels.

They clad the exterior in cedar and made it slightly taller at the back, giving the trailer an angular shape. Now complete, it’s 8.5-feet wide and 13.5-feet high at its tallest point, which is at the legal limit for highway travel without a special permit.

The interior has the look and feel of a conventional (tethered) modern home. It features birch-veneer plywood for much of its space, including the walls, floor, ceiling, and kitchen cabinets. Despite its great similarities, Woody differs from your standard home.

It employs tiny-house efficiencies: the bed is lofted; the refrigerator is half-size; and there are storage compartments built into the floor. And although a sliding glass door and two skylights don’t necessarily maximize their small space, the additions offer ample natural light and airiness, giving the mobile abode a visual sense of space.

Brian and Joni finished their project in 2012 for about $50,000 and took Woody from Austin, Texas to a five-acre plot in Marble, Colorado. They plan on living in their home until they start a family.




Via My Modern Met, HomeCrux, Dwell. All Photos © Benjamin Rasmussen.

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/nomadic-couple-built-a-stylish-trailer-home-for-50000/

The Abandoned Refrigerators of Katrina

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Hurricane Katrina, that ravaged the Gulf Coast and the entire city of New Orleans in the summer of 2005, ruined a lot of household appliances but damaged refrigerators belonged to an entirely different realm of problems.


Image source

When Katrina forced people to evacuate their homes, a few residents emptied their refrigerators before they evacuated, but most of them left theirs with all the food inside. They didn’t know that they would lose power for weeks, or that they wouldn’t be able to return home until a month or more later. All this time the food sat in the stifling 90-degree heat inside the refrigerators and rotted. Vegetables and fruits, meat and fish had all turned into a disgusting slimy mess teeming with maggots.


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People who returned and opened their refrigerators immediately regretted. The food had become so toxic that it melted plastic, corroded metal, and dissolved rubber refrigerator liners. The smell was unbearable. Word got out and many didn’t open their refrigerators at all. They sealed them shut with duct tape and pushed the box of horrors out of their homes and into the curb. Some people tried and found it impossible to fully clean their refrigerators. The smell just wouldn’t go. Eventually, refrigerators started to crop up in the streets like mushrooms after the rain, even in parts of the city that wasn’t flooded. An overwhelming smell of death and decay hung over the entire city.


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The putrid task of disposing these machines fell upon the local government, who assigned a special crew for the job. These men were trained in the handling of hazardous materials and were armed with special equipment and hazmat suits. But the destruction throughout the region was so extensive that the clean-up operation took months to complete. Sitting there outside the homes, the abandoned refrigerators began to attract graffiti and soon became a platform for art and personal expression. As time dragged on some began to be decorated with festive Christmas ornaments and salutations.


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For months the spray-painted refrigerators became a ubiquitous symbol of post-Katrina New Orleans. People began photographing Katrina refrigerators, and organizing exhibitions featuring these photographs. Even books were written about them. That year at Halloween parties, Katrina refrigerators were a popular costume idea.


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Eventually the refrigerators were hauled to a scrapyard to be recycled. As many as 150,000 refrigerators were dumped at the Gentilly Landfill by December 2005. By early 2006, the last of them were gone.


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A “Bobcat” picks up dead domestic refrigerator and other debris.


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A “Bobcat” dumps a refrigerator on a landfill in New Orleans.


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Thousands of refrigerators lie on a landfill in 2006 waiting to be scrapped.


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Thousands of refrigerators lie on a landfill in 2006 waiting to be scrapped.

Via Amusing Planet, Wikipedia, Karen Ashley, NOLA

SOURCE: http://designyoutrust.com/2015/10/the-abandoned-refrigerators-of-katrina/