These Colourised Photographs Show How People Took Shelter in The London Underground in The 1940s

According to Lottie Cutcher, a photo retouch magician: “My name is Lottie, and I love looking through old photos. For my day job I work in costume, so I’m passionate about social history and getting the colour accurately matched. I recently started colourising black and white photographs to bring out how the scene would have actually looked at the time the picture was taken. I think black and white photographs have a beautiful style of their own, but colourising them helps the pictures feel relevant and relatable today, and gives them more context in the real world.

I chose to colourise a series of photographs from the Blitz during World War Two. The original images are so interesting, and I find it surreal that people took shelter in all sorts of places whilst the war was happening around their homes. I hope that by doing this, I can reinforce that people over 75 years ago looked and felt just the same as we do today. Hope you enjoy them!”

More: Hindsight Colouring, Instagram h/t: boredpanda

The Blitz was an almost daily bombing raid during 1940/1941. During this time, Londoners were encouraged to take cover overnight in the tube stations and tunnels

Originally the Government had concerns that people would be too scared to leave the tube and would not surface to work towards the war effort. With many having nowhere else to go, they relented

Numbers averaged around 150,000 a night, however a total of 177,000 people spent the night underground on 27th September 1940

It was far from safe. Many people were killed from direct station hits. In March 1943, 173 people died in a crush at Bethnal Green station when a woman panicked and slipped on the stairs entering the station

Many felt safer sleeping with the noise of the bombing more muffled above them as they slept deeper down in the stations and tunnels

They look surprisingly snug!

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/09/these-colourised-photographs-show-how-people-took-shelter-in-the-london-underground-in-the-1940s/

Edwardian London as Seen Through the Eyes of an Unknown Russian Tourist in 1909

London entered the 20th century at the height of its influence as the capital of the largest empire in history, but the new century was to bring many challenges. London was the largest city in the world from about 1825 until it was overtaken by New York City in 1925.

h/t: vintag.es

The years between Queen Victoria’s death in 1901 and the start of the First World War in 1914 were years of growth and general prosperity, though the extreme inequalities which had characterized Victorian London continued. By 1900 one out of five Britons lived in London, with the population of roughly 5 million in 1900 rising to over 7 million by 1911.

These 20 amazing photographs below show street scenes of London at the turn of the 20th century. They were taken by an unknown Russian tourist in 1909.

















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/edwardian-london-as-seen-through-the-eyes-of-an-unknown-russian-tourist-in-1909/

Incredible Color Photographs That Show What Life Was Really Like in Britain in the 1950s

Unemployment was very low in the 1950s and it was a long period of prosperity. In the early part of the decade, there was still rationing. However, food rationing ended in 1954. In the 1950s living standards in Britain rose considerably. In the late 1950s, Britain became an affluent society. By 1959 about two-thirds of British homes had a vacuum cleaner. However, even in 1960, only 44% of homes had a washing machine.

h/t: vintag.es

In the early 1950s, many homes in Britain still did not have bathrooms and only had outside lavatories. But slum clearance began in the late 1950s.

Meanwhile in the 1950s large numbers of West Indians arrived in Britain. Also from the 1950s, many Asians came. In the late 20th century Britain became a multi-cultural society. Also, in the 1950s young people had significant disposable income for the first time. A distinct ‘youth culture’ emerged, with teddy boys. A revolution in music was led by Elvis Presley and Bill Haley.

The way people shopped also changed. In the early 20th century people usually went to small local shops such as a baker or butcher. The shops usually did deliveries. If you went to the butcher you paid for meat and a butcher’s boy on a bicycle delivered it. The first supermarket in Britain opened in 1948. Fish fingers went on sale in 1955.

Cars increased in number after World War II. By 1959 32% of households owned a car. The first zebra crossing was introduced in 1949. Lollipop men and women followed in 1953. The first parking meters in Britain were installed in London in 1958.

TV first became common in the 1950s. A lot of people bought a TV set to watch the coronation of Elizabeth II and a survey at the end of that year showed that about one-quarter of households had one. By 1959 about two-thirds of homes had a TV. At first, there was only one TV channel but between 1955 and 1957 the ITV companies began broadcasting.



























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/incredible-color-photographs-that-show-what-life-was-really-like-in-britain-in-the-1950s/

Spacelander was the Bicycle of the Future, 1946-1960

The Spacelander bicycle was designed by Benjamin Bowden for the 1946 exhibition Britain Can Make It. Originally known as the Classic, the streamlined design was said to represent what the bicycle of the future was supposed to look like.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

The frame was made from two steel clamshell halves pressed together into a monocoque and the front fork and mudguard were all one piece. The prototype featured a driveshaft and a hub dynamo that stored energy when riding downhill and gave a boost when riding uphill. The batteries inside the frame powered lights, a horn, and a built-in radio.

The bicycle was priced at $89.50, which made it one of the more expensive bicycles on the market. In addition, the fiberglass frame was relatively fragile, and its unusual nature made it difficult to market to established bicycle distributors. Only 522 Spacelander bicycles were shipped before production was halted, although more complete sets of parts were manufactured.

Beginning in the 1980s, there was a resurgence of interest in the Spacelander as a collectors’ item. The Bicycle Museum in Pennsylvania owns 17 of the proposed 38 left Spacelanders in the world.





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/spacelander-was-the-bicycle-of-the-future-1946-1960/

New Banksy Artworks Spotted in Gorleston, Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft

Looks like Banksy is spending his summer holidays in the UK as a few pieces have just popped up in Gorleston, Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft. As usual with the elusive British artist, he dropped a series of brilliant works which are sure to be enjoyed by the local vacationers.

More: Instagram h/t: streetartnews





SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/08/new-banksy-artworks-spotted-in-gorleston-great-yarmouth-and-lowestoft/

This UFO Spaceship McDonald’s Used to Exist in Alconbury, England in the 1990s

For many kids, getting a McDonald’s on a long drive would be the ultimate treat. And if you grew up in or around Cambridgeshire in the 1990s, you’ll probably remember getting a Happy Meal at the spaceship McDonald’s just off the A1 at Alconbury, near Huntingdon.

h/t: vintag.es

Originally built in 1990 as a Megatron, the restaurant was going to be the first of many in the chain. But the plans never happened, and instead the building became a McDonald’s in 1993.


The UFO Maccies sadly closed in 2000 due to soaring maintenance costs. It then remained empty for a number of years before it was demolished in 2008.


SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/07/this-ufo-spaceship-mcdonalds-used-to-exist-in-alconbury-england-in-the-1990s/

Extraordinary Aerial Photographs of London From the 1920s Taken by Alfred G Buckham

Creating spectacular images in the face of technical and physical adversity, Captain Alfred G Buckham (1879-1956) was the foremost aerial photographer of his day. Between 1908 to the early 1930s, Buckham created aerial portraits that are awe-inspiring, poetic and works of technical brilliance.

h/t: vintag.es

During the First World War he was Captain in the Royal Naval Air Service. However, by 1919 he was discharged as disabled, the result of nine crashes that left him breathing through a tube in his neck for the rest of his life – but that didn’t stop him risking loss of consciousness to capture spectacular images.

These extraordinary aerial shots of London were taken by Buckham in the 1920s with a heavy plate camera, leaning perilously out of the aeroplane, as he told, “I always stand up to make an exposure and, taking the precaution to tie my right leg to the seat, I am free to move about rapidly, and easily, in any desired direction; and loop the loop and indulge in other such delights, with perfect safety.”

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/extraordinary-aerial-photographs-of-london-from-the-1920s-taken-by-alfred-g-buckham/

Rare Photographs Reveal British Soldiers Manning Anti-Aircraft Guns in Full Drag in World War II

This set of photographs, taken by John Topham while working in RAF intelligence, was censored by the British Ministry of Information when they were taken during the Second World War. The images were captured during a visit to the base of the Royal Artillery Coastal Defence Battery at Shornemead Fort, near Gravesend, in Kent.

h/t: vintag.es

Taken in 1940, these pictures show the gunners going about their business in dresses, complete with their usual helmets. Others show the men applying makeup to each other, running up steps as their dresses blow in the wind and showing off their undergarments on stage. The troops had been rehearsing in drag for one of the shows they often staged to keep themselves entertained.

However during one of Topham’s visits, the men were called to attention in order to deal with the approach of Luftwaffe bombers, going over the Channel to southern England. As there was no time to change back into their uniforms they had no choice but to return to their battle stations still dressed in drag.

After the war, Topham revealed that the Ministry of Information was concerned that these specific pictures could undermine morale. It was feared that it would give the impression that British troops were not quite as masculine as the public believed. There may have also been concern that Nazi propaganda chiefs would use the images of the troops in drag shooting anti-aircraft guns to ridicule Allies.



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/06/rare-photographs-reveal-british-soldiers-manning-anti-aircraft-guns-in-full-drag-in-world-war-ii/

“Sweeteens”: Young Londoners Enjoying Freedom after the Lockdown

Made from photographs taken in May of last year, as the UK’s first lockdown began to ease, photographer Laura Jane Coulson’s new book, Sweeteens, is a love letter to freedom, youth, and the green spaces of London. The book immortalizes friends of the photographer, mostly young people, enjoying these precious moments of freedom in such an absurd time.

More: Laura Jane Coulson, “Sweeteens” h/t: fubiz

“In May 2020, at the end of an unseasonably warm spring, lockdown began to lift – and with it, to everybody’s surprise, the thrum of friction that soundtracks a city like London subsided. The percussive clang of discord, usually a constant companion from borough to borough, was temporarily silent. In its place, harmony hung like a low haze over the streets, sinking into the cracks between buildings and soothing their inhabitants. Permitted to spend time outside again, Londoners were drawn to the city’s green spaces to see their friends and family – from a distance, kind of.

The combination of proximity after months spent in isolation, the quiet joy of reunion, intimacy and idle chatter, the bittersweet recognition of what had been lost in a few short months all melded together, glued by heat, relief, a kind of raw, hopeful happiness. The atmosphere was defiant, gentle, bold and jubilant. It felt strangely calm. This is the city that Laura Jane Coulson captures, in the photographs that follow. A couple of weeks later, something in the air had changed again, and the spell was over. The cacophony returned, coarse and dissonant as ever. But that, of course, is part of the magic.”

A project that also has a charitable purpose: all proceeds will be donated to YoungMinds, an organization that takes care of young people’s mental health during these pandemic months.




SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/sweeteens-young-londoners-enjoying-freedom-after-the-lockdown/

The Original British Skinhead Subculture in Photographic Portraits, 1970-1990

The skinhead subculture was born in England in the late 1960s as an offshoot of the mod culture. Skinheads were distinct from other British subcultures due to their uniform of boots, jeans, braces (suspenders), and the trademark shaved head.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos, amazon Photo credit: Getty Images / PYMCA / Gamma-Keystone / Hulton Archives / Gavin Watson: Youth Club Archive


1970

Their style was an exaggerated version of the traditional unskilled laborer. One of the first scholars to research skinheads, sociologist Mike Brake, classified skinheads as a “traditional working-class delinquent subculture” and documented five traits that defined first-generation British skinheads: toughness and violence; football (soccer), ethnocentrism, Puritan work ethic; and a cynical worldview.


1970

According to author Nick Knight, skinheads first appeared as a distinct youth subculture in 1968. He states in his book Skinhead, “In establishing their own style, the younger brothers of mods adopted certain elements of mod style, combined them with items from traditional working clothes, borrowed some influences from the West Indian blacks and became skinheads.”


1971

Motivated by social alienation and working-class solidarity, skinheads were defined by their close-cropped or shaven heads (long hair was a liability in factory work and street fights) and working-class clothing such as Dr. Martens and steel toe work boots, braces, high rise jeans, and button-down collar shirts, usually slim fitting in check or plain.


1980

In England, there were two waves of the skinhead cult. From its inception, the skinhead subculture was largely based around music. The first group appeared in the late 1960s as an offshoot of the mod subculture and largely died out by 1972.


1980

The second wave arrived in the late 1970s and early 1980s. These skinheads differed from the first generation, in that they were not influenced as much by mod as they were by the growing punk and 2Tone Ska scenes in London. Punk lent itself to violence through its embrace of aggressive music and teenage angst. Skinheads reflected this new influence by combining the exaggerated imagery of the original skinhead style with punk.


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Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Portrait of the photographer as a young skin. Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive


Gavin Watson / Youth Club Archive

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/05/the-original-british-skinhead-subculture-in-photographic-portraits-1970-1990/