Machinalia : Boris Artzybasheff’s Surreal Visions of Living Machines

Boris Artzybasheff (25 May 1899 – 16 July 1965) was born in Kharkiv, Ukraine. In 1919 he arrived in New York City and began work as an engraver. He illustrated 50 books, many of which he wrote, and scores of magazines, including Life, Fortune, and more than 200 covers for Time.

After 1940, he devoted himself to commercial art, including advertisements for Xerox, Shell Oil, Pan Am, Casco Power Tools, Alcoa Steamship lines, Parke-Davis, Avco Manufacturing, Scotch Tape, Wickwire Spencer Steele, Vultee Aircraft, World Airways, and Parker Pens.

In commercial work he explored anthropomorphism, where machines displayed human attributes, the so-called Machinalia.

Included here are some of Artzybasheff’s adverts for the Wickwire Spencer Steel Company of New York City. Published in 1942, the adverts called on readers to “help end the war” by collecting scrap iron.

h/t: flashbak

“I am thrilled by machinery’s force, precision and willingness to work at any task, no matter how arduous or monotonous it may be. I would rather watch a thousand ton dredge dig a canal than see it done by a thousand spent slaves lashed into submission. I like machines,” he wrote.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/machinalia-boris-artzybasheffs-surreal-visions-of-living-machines/

Machinalia : Boris Artzybasheff’s Surreal Visions of Living Machines

Boris Artzybasheff (25 May 1899 – 16 July 1965) was born in Kharkiv, Ukraine. In 1919 he arrived in New York City and began work as an engraver. He illustrated 50 books, many of which he wrote, and scores of magazines, including Life, Fortune, and more than 200 covers for Time.

After 1940, he devoted himself to commercial art, including advertisements for Xerox, Shell Oil, Pan Am, Casco Power Tools, Alcoa Steamship lines, Parke-Davis, Avco Manufacturing, Scotch Tape, Wickwire Spencer Steele, Vultee Aircraft, World Airways, and Parker Pens.

In commercial work he explored anthropomorphism, where machines displayed human attributes, the so-called Machinalia.

Included here are some of Artzybasheff’s adverts for the Wickwire Spencer Steel Company of New York City. Published in 1942, the adverts called on readers to “help end the war” by collecting scrap iron.

h/t: flashbak

“I am thrilled by machinery’s force, precision and willingness to work at any task, no matter how arduous or monotonous it may be. I would rather watch a thousand ton dredge dig a canal than see it done by a thousand spent slaves lashed into submission. I like machines,” he wrote.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/machinalia-boris-artzybasheffs-surreal-visions-of-living-machines/

Elephant Hotel: The Prime Example of Novelty Architecture in 1880s

Novelty architecture, also called programmatic or mimetic architecture, is a type of architecture in which buildings and other structures are given unusual shapes for purposes such as advertising or to copy other famous buildings without any intention of being authentic.

h/t: vintag.es

Their size and novelty means that they often serve as landmarks. They are distinct from architectural follies, in that novelty architecture is essentially usable buildings in eccentric form whereas follies are non-usable, ornamental buildings often in eccentric form.

Utility buildings and “novelty structures” are the red headed step-children of architecture – Like the Elephant Hotel, a 10 room hotel built in 1885. Intended to be one of a menagerie of buildings in the Margate City project in Atlantic City, New Jersey.




SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/elephant-hotel-the-prime-example-of-novelty-architecture-in-1880s/

Brutal 1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Touring Berlinetta

First shown at the 1935 London Motor Show, the 8C 2900A was a sports racer targeted to the gentleman driver, powered by a supercharged 2.9-liter inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 220 horsepower.

h/t: The Dieselpunk Flim-Flam

In the hands of Scuderia Ferrari, Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A models swept the podium at the 1936 Mille Miglia, backing up this performance by finishing 1-2 in the 1937 race. Not every buyer needed (or wanted) a car with this level of performance, so in response Alfa Romeo created the the slightly more relaxed 8C 2900B in 1937.

The 8C 2900B was detuned for greater reliability, producing 180 horsepower thanks in part to a drop in compression from 6.5:1 to 5.75:1. Though the eight-cylinder engine retained its 2.9-liter displacement and Roots-type supercharger, aluminum was substituted for magnesium on certain engine castings and the wheelbase was lengthened slightly from 2.75 meters (roughly 108 inches) to 2.8 meters (roughly 110 inches) on corto (short) chassis examples. The 8C 2900B also debuted a new lungo chassis variant, which utilized a wheelbase of 3.0 meters (roughly 118 inches).

Just 10 lungo chassis 8C 2900B models were ever built, including the five aforementioned examples wearing enclosed Berlinetta bodywork from Carrozzeria Touring. Chassis 412020 was the first completed, and displayed at motor shows across Europe in late 1937 and early 1938.



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/brutal-1938-alfa-romeo-8c-2900b-lungo-touring-berlinetta/

Brutal 1938 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Touring Berlinetta

First shown at the 1935 London Motor Show, the 8C 2900A was a sports racer targeted to the gentleman driver, powered by a supercharged 2.9-liter inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 220 horsepower.

h/t: The Dieselpunk Flim-Flam

In the hands of Scuderia Ferrari, Alfa Romeo 8C 2900A models swept the podium at the 1936 Mille Miglia, backing up this performance by finishing 1-2 in the 1937 race. Not every buyer needed (or wanted) a car with this level of performance, so in response Alfa Romeo created the the slightly more relaxed 8C 2900B in 1937.

The 8C 2900B was detuned for greater reliability, producing 180 horsepower thanks in part to a drop in compression from 6.5:1 to 5.75:1. Though the eight-cylinder engine retained its 2.9-liter displacement and Roots-type supercharger, aluminum was substituted for magnesium on certain engine castings and the wheelbase was lengthened slightly from 2.75 meters (roughly 108 inches) to 2.8 meters (roughly 110 inches) on corto (short) chassis examples. The 8C 2900B also debuted a new lungo chassis variant, which utilized a wheelbase of 3.0 meters (roughly 118 inches).

Just 10 lungo chassis 8C 2900B models were ever built, including the five aforementioned examples wearing enclosed Berlinetta bodywork from Carrozzeria Touring. Chassis 412020 was the first completed, and displayed at motor shows across Europe in late 1937 and early 1938.



SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/brutal-1938-alfa-romeo-8c-2900b-lungo-touring-berlinetta/

Teach Yourself to Draw with The Help of The Man Who Influenced Walt Disney, 1913

“In drawing from this book, copy the last diagram, or finished picture, of the particular series before you,” advises American artist E.G. Lutz (August 26, 1868 — March 30, 1951) in the introduction to his first book What To Draw and How To Draw It (1913).

h/t: flashbak

“The other diagrams – beginning with number one, then number two, and so on – show how to go on with your drawing. They give the order in which to make the various strokes of the pencil that together form the completed picture. The dotted lines indicate where light lines are drawn that – help in construction – that is; getting proportions correctly, outlining the general form, or marking details in their proper places. Do not press hard on the pencil in making these construction lines, then they can be erased afterwards. Use pencil compasses for the circles, or mark them off with buttons or disks.”

Readers may also enjoy Edward George Lutz’s Drawing made easy : a helpful book for young artists; the way to begin and finish your sketches, clearly shown step by step, published in 1922. But let’s begin at the beginning. Readers in good company. Mr Lutz authored 17 books, most were how-to manuals dealing with art and drawing techniques, but two were about aspects of the film industry. His book Animated Cartoons – How they are made, their origin and development (1920) was discovered by the 19-year-old Walt Disney at his local library in Kansas City who used it as a guide.



















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/teach-yourself-to-draw-with-the-help-of-the-man-who-influenced-walt-disney-1913/

Amazing Rare Photographs of The Romanovs’ Final Ball In Color, St Petersburg, Russia 1903

The last emperor of Russia Nicolas II dressed in the golden brocade of 17th-century Russian tsar Alexey Mikhailovich, standng with Empress Alexandra Fedorovna. All the jewellery was chosen by court jeweller Carl Faberge.

These portrait photographs of Russia’s ruling Romanovs were taken in 1903 at the Winter Palace in majestic. St. Petersburg. Knowing what was to follow, the venue was apposite.

Czar Nicholas II and his 390 guests partied for 2 days. Day one (February 11) saw dancing, music and food. With the guests loosened up and rested, day 2 (Feb 15th) featured a masked ball. There was a surfeit of sexual excess, debauchery and entitlement for a family whose absolutist rule was hailed by the country’s grateful serfs – they dubbed the Czar ‘Little Father’ – and supported by a complicit church which declared Romanov blood sacred.

In 1918, Bolshevik officials executed the ex-Emperor and his family.

These color images were created by Olga Shirnina, whose colorized photographs of Russian history and Soviet female snipers in WW2 bring the past to life.

h/t: flashbak

Princess Olga Orlova in Masquerade Costume for the Ball

Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia, 1903

Alexandra Feodorovna, Costume Ball 1903

Zinaida Yusupova

La Comtesse Karlow, nee Vonlarsky (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

La Comtesse Fersen, nee Princesse Dolgorouky (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

La Comtesse Orlow-Davydow, nee Zographo (Femme de boyard du XVII siecle)

Cornette Kolioubakine

Mademoiselle Dorothee Bibikow, 1903

La Comtesse Keller, née Princesse Schakhovskoy (Femme de boyard)

Mademoiselle Alexandrine Taneiew

La Princesse Elisabeth Obolensky, Demoiselle d’honneur de Sa Ma

La Comtesse Elisabeth Moussine-Pouchkine, née Comtesse Capnist (Femme de boyard du XVII siècle)

La Princesse Youssoupow

Anna Taneeva (Vyrubova) with sister

S.A.S. la Princesse Galitzine, née Comtesse Moussine-Pou


S.A.S. le Prince Dmitri Galitzine, Chef de la Venerie Imperial

Madame Bezobrazow, nee Comtesse Stenbock-Fermor (Femme de boyard)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/amazing-rare-photographs-of-the-romanovs-final-ball-in-color-st-petersburg-russia-1903/

Inspired by Space 1999, a Miniature Volkswagen Space Transporter

Alvis Pi, a Space 1999 fan, created this model, the Volkswagen Space Transporter, mixing an Eagle with a Volkswagen van, the end result is fantastic.

It was built from a VW Hasegawa kit, plastic pipes, ladders, handrails and plastic sheet, and the engines are from a 1/144 Revell Saturn V kit. The crew is a 1/24 scale, has two pods, one for passenger transport and a Hydro pod that carries a piece of a satellite and a rare plant. Very good job.

Space: 1999 is a science-fiction television programme that ran for two series from 1975 to 1977. In the opening episode, set in the year 1999, nuclear waste stored on the Moon’s far side explodes, knocking the Moon out of orbit and sending it, as well as the 311 inhabitants of Moonbase Alpha, hurtling uncontrollably into space.

h/t: tumblr, messynessychic









SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/inspired-by-space-1999-a-miniature-volkswagen-space-transporter/

Before the Photoshop Era, Here Are What Manipulated Photos Looked Like in the Early 20th Century

“Pumpkins grown in Iowa soil are profitable”

Photo manipulation dates back to some of the earliest photographs captured on glass and tin plates during the 19th century. The practice began not long after the creation of the first photograph (1825) by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce who developed heliography and made the first photographic print from a photoengraved printing plate.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

When we go after something in Colorado, we got it”

Traditional photographic prints can be altered using various methods and techniques that involve manipulation directly to the print, such as retouching with ink, paint, airbrushing, or scratching Polaroids during developing (Polaroid art).

So what did manipulated photos look like in the early 20th century? Just check out these fascinating photos from Rick Soloway to see.

“Zeppelin flying over Cosmopolitan Studios, N.Y. 1927” is noted on back

A New Farm Hand

An Early Bi-Plane in Flight

Bobby Leach and his barrel

County Fair Corn Contest

Garden City, Iowa

Hauling Pineapples, Honolulu

Lobsters and Lady

Man Eating Bass

May the Best Man Win

Rocky Mountain Rack Jabbit

The Train Hold-Up

Two Wise Old Birds

West Texas Jackrabbit

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/before-the-photoshop-era-here-are-what-manipulated-photos-looked-like-in-the-early-20th-century/

The America We Lost: Fascinating Found Photos Show How Life of the U.S Looked Like in the 1960s

Florida gulf, 1962

The 1960s were a decade of revolution and change in politics, music and society around the world. It started in the United States and the United Kingdom, and spread to continental Europe and other parts of the globe.

More: Flickr h/t: vintag.es

Chula Vista gift shop, Branson, Missouri, 1962

The 1960s were an era of protest. In the civil rights movement blacks and whites protested against the unfair treatment of races. Towards the end of the decade more and more Americans protested against the war in Vietnam. Many people in the United States thought that Americans had no reason to fight in war that was so far away from home.

House and car, DeLand, Florida, 1962

Female activists demanded more rights for women, whose role in society began to change. The birth control pill and other contraceptives were introduced, making it possible for women to plan their careers and have babies when they wanted them.

Loc-Wood boat dock, Bagnell Dam, Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri, 1962

After World War II people all over the world started working hard and respecting the values they were brought up with. Especially in Europe, it was an era of recovery and rebuilding. In the 1960s many young people started doubting such values. They protested against society and everything that was mainstream. They had hair long and wore unusual and strange clothes.

These fascinating photos were found by Dean Avants that shows how life of the United States looked like in the 1960s.

Times Square, NYC, 1963

Boy with “JUST MARRIED” car, Virginia, 1964

Two girls hurrying to a 1957 Ford Fairline convertible, 1964

Two ladies outside a camping trailer, circa 1964

42nd street, NYC, 1966

Chicago skyline from Civic Center, Illinois, 1966

Demonstration in Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Dinosaur Land, Vernal, Utah, 1966

Dodge City, Kansas, 1966

Entrance to America the Beautiful in Circarama, Disneyland, 1966

Greenwich Village, NYC, 1966

Johnson Wax Headquarters, Racine, Wisconsin, 1966

Lady reading pamphlet on street, Boston, Massachusetts, 1966

Laurent House, Illinois, 1966

Radio City Music Hall, NYC, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Reno, Nevada, 1966

Students on field trip, somewhere in Oklahoma, 1966

Times Square, NYC, 1966

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1966

“It’s a Small World” ride, Disneyland, 1967

Girls on the beach, California, 1967

Tombstone, Arizona, 1967

White Sands, New Mexico, 1967

1968 Ford Mustang in driveway at NW 47th and Villa, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1968

Cycle race, Daytona Speedway, Florida, 1968

Girl at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Golf game in the mountains, 1968

Small group of friends at Alabaster Caverns, Oklahoma, 1968

Photo shoot, Maryland, 1969

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/01/the-america-we-lost-fascinating-found-photos-show-how-life-of-the-u-s-looked-like-in-the-1960s/