This Anesthesiologist Recreates Historical Clothes

History can be something to learn from, something to study, or just plain boring to some people. However, for some, it’s a source of inspiration and a way to unleash their creativity and style.

Dr. Christine Na-Eun Millar is a “historical costumer, board-certified doctor, gamer, mother, wife. Not always in that order,” as she describes herself in her Instagram bio. Christine creates amazing clothes, and especially gowns from the 1700s. She looks at inspiration from those times and creates her unique looks. She is an anesthesiologist by profession and has a beautiful child with her husband. Her family often appears in her photos also wearing historical clothing.

More: Instagram, Youtube h/t: boredpanda

Christine shared with Bored Panda: “So, I work full time as a doctor (MD) in a hospital, so after everything I see and deal with at work, I need an outlet to sort of focus my creativity and my energy. I found that of all the mediums, sewing relaxed me the most. There is something about working with a needle and thread and patiently putting things together, slowly, that helped take away the stress of work.”

“In particular, my favorite images growing up were historical gowns, princess gowns, and just overall pretty dresses. So I started to try to recreate them. I love taking a museum piece, like the green redingote from the Rijks Museum, and trying to figure out in my head how they sewed it together and how the original artist embroidered it.”

“For me, while I love sewing, I don’t enjoy hand embroidery. So I started doing the embroidery by machine. I draw out or ‘digitize’ the embroidery on a computer, designating exactly where I want each stitch to be, and in what order. After that, I send it to Foto to do Perfil de Sewstine, my embroidery machine, and have it stitch it out. It’s a lot of fun to see something you’ve made on a computer stitched out in silk.”

“As for how I pick which gown—oh, I couldn’t tell you what it is. I always have a list of about 50 gowns in my head that I want to make. At some point, a whim or a thought comes to me that it’s time to make that dress. For instance, just last night, I woke up in the middle of the night and I knew that I needed to work on a chemise a la Reine, so that will probably be my next project.”

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/this-anesthesiologist-recreates-historical-clothes/

Satirical and Absurd Illustrations From JJ Grandville’s Un Autre Monde, 1844

‘Un Autre Monde: Transformations, Visions, Incarnations Et Autres Choses’ by JJ Grandville (1803-1847) was published by H. Fournier of Paris in 1844. The illustrations are, as the book’s sole reviewer at the Internet Archive puts it, “nutty, weird and wonderful – funny and strange.” The work is “very good!”. It is.

h/t: flashbak

JJ Grandville, nee Jean Ignace Isidore Gérard (13 September 1803 – 17 March 1847), generally known by the pseudonym of Jean-Jacques, was a French caricaturist and illustrator. His surreal drawings seem to hover in the twilight between sleep and waking. Animals and plants walk, talk and dance. Celestial objects take human forms. In one scene playing cards fight one another. A smiling giant juggles the planets of the known solar system.

Written by Taxile Delord, the editor of the journal Le Charivari to which Grandville had contributed numerous drawings, Un Autre Monde features a trio of Supreme Beings travelling through a version of the human world. The absurdities of life are there to see and enjoy.










































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/04/satirical-and-absurd-illustrations-from-jj-grandvilles-un-autre-monde-1844/

The Qajar Series, Inspired by The Studio Portraiture First Introduced to Iran in The Late 19th Century

These photographs are from a series of thirty-three portraits by Shadi Ghadirian, a contemporary artist who was inspired by the studio portraiture first introduced to Iran in the late nineteenth century under the Qajar dynasty (1794–1925).

In order to re-create the earlier setting, Ghadirian employs painted backdrops and dresses her models in vintage clothes to emulate the fashion of the day: headscarves and short skirts worn over baggy trousers, as well as thick, black eyebrows. She adds modern elements to these traditional scenes, such as a Pepsi can, a boom box, a bicycle and an avant-garde Tehran newspaper.

She has said of her work, “My pictures became a mirror reflecting how I felt: we are stuck between tradition and modernity.”

More: LACMA h/t: messynessychic






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/the-qajar-series-inspired-by-the-studio-portraiture-first-introduced-to-iran-in-the-late-19th-century/

Stunning Black and White Photographs Captured the Spirit of Early 20th Century Athletics

My nanny Dudu, 40, on rue Cortambert in Paris, 1904.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Jacques Henri Lartigue was fascinated by the ascent of sport in the early 20th century as a fashionable pastime for the middle classes, and was himself a keen sportsman. Lartigue’s entirely unposed photographs, presented album-style in this gorgeous, luxurious and delightful volume, capture both the joyous exuberance of amateur sports––racing, skiing, tennis, gymnastics, hang gliding––and the particular character of its popularity in the first half of the 20th century.

h/t: vintag.es

Oléo, Rouzat, August 1908.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Lartigue is an absolute master at conveying the dynamism of the human body at play––the peculiar shapes it can contort into, and the gestures that can express anything from easy nonchalance to fierce focus. These photographs also serve as a historical catalogue of the paraphernalia and smart casual clothing associated with each sport.

The ZYX24 takes off while Piroux, Zissou, Georges, Louis, Dédé and Robert make there attempt as well in Rouzat, September 1910.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Jacques Henri Lartigue (1894–1986) was a French photographer and painter, most famous for his photographs of the leisure activities of France’s middle and upper classes. An avid photographer from the age of seven, Lartigue gained fame for his photo albums, which provide a comprehensive chronicle of the twentieth century in France and abroad, and for his official portraits.

Robert, the lightest, is chosen to test-fly the “Pic no. 3” in Rouzat, September 1910.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Dédé in Rouzat, 1911.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Zissou leans against the wind from Amerigo’s propeller in Buc, Nov. 9, 1911.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Grand Prix de L’Automobile Club de France, 1912.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

The great racer Nazzaro signals to Wagner to accelerate, Grand Prix de l’A.C.F., June 26, 1912.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Simone Roussel in Marly Forest, 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

My cousin Simone and Golo in Marly Forest, March 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Charly, Rico and Sim in Rouzat, September 1913.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Training of Suzanne Lenglen, Nice, November 1915.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Malvina in Chamonix, January 1918.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Bibi and Lolo in Paris, 1921.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Cannes, May 1927.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Cannes, May 1927.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Dawn in Hyères, September 1929.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Coco at l’Altana, the Weisswellers’ estate in Antibes, March 1936.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

Deauville, June 1938.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

World ski-jumping championships in Juan-les-Pins, September 1938.

Jacques Henri Lartigue/Ministère de la Culture-France/AAJHL

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/stunning-black-and-white-photographs-captured-the-spirit-of-early-20th-century-athletics/

Vintage Photos of Stunning Custom Cars Painted by Larry Watson in the 1950s

Larry Watson was born on July 21, 1938, in Bellflower, California. He began his pinstriping career at the tender age of 16, having grown up in a time period that saw the Southern California scene abuzz with the latest American makes and model cars; a time period that would later be considered “the era of Bombs.”

His self taught talent began to attract attention while the aspiring painter was still in high school, especially after he reached the completion stages of his custom 1950 Chevy. He christened the car “Grapevine,” and soon after, Larry was the “man” for pinstriping.

h/t: vintag.es, lowrider

In 1957, fresh out of high school, Larry opened his own business, which he called “Watson’s House of Style” in Long Beach, California. Larry had already built his 1950 Chevy and wanted to start a new trend by customizing and color-creating with paint. He bought a brand new 1958 Ford Thunderbird and gave it a panel paint job. Many credit Larry, thanks to this car and its paint job, as the creator of panel style paint jobs. Historians widely recognize his T-Bird as being the first car to have a panel paint job.

Over the years, Larry continued to create and perfect many of the styles and techniques of custom paint that are still used today in the Lowrider scene. Along with panel paint, he is credited with inventing scallops, which were used to cover up paint runs the same way pinstriping was first used to cover up chips and scratches. We have Larry to thank for lace painting and seaweed flames as well. Larry also perfected quite a few new styles, including cob webbing, fades, and veils by using new materials like pearls, candies, and metallics to raise the bar in the booming custom paint realm.

Larry’s legacy will live on through today’s custom painters who will undoubtedly continue to use the techniques and styles he created and perfected during his lifetime. He passed away at the age of 70 on July 20, 2010.


























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/vintage-photos-of-stunning-custom-cars-painted-by-larry-watson-in-the-1950s/

Lettering Artist Rafael Serra Creates Popular Logos in A Vintage Spirit

Pizza Hut, Spotify, Liddl… Inspired by advertising and marketing from the 70s, Portuguese type designer and lettering artist Rafael Serra imagined what modern brand logos would look like if they had been designed some decades ago. Playing with colors and typography, the artist offers a new version of these logos that we know very well today, and gives them a vintage and retro style.

More: Instagram, Behance h/t: fubiz
































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/03/lettering-artist-rafael-serra-creates-popular-logos-in-a-vintage-spirit/

Before Bikini: Cool Photos of Women in Swimsuits From the 1930s

The silhouette of the 1930s swimsuit took on direct inspiration from men’s swimsuits (which were still one pieces). Men were encouraged to build a muscular yet lean sportsman’s body. Women also needed to slim down into an athletic body that was tall, lean, and curvy up top to flatter the latest bias cut dresses.

h/t: vintag.es

Swimsuits were cut to show off more leg and more back skin than ever before. The thin straps also made the shoulders appear broader and more athletic. It became what we know as the swimsuit today.

In the 1920s, most swimsuits were one solid color only. In the 1930s, a top half and bottom half could each be different colors or have cubist shapes stitched into (or onto) the design for even more color. Belts and decorative ties emphasized the waist. Swimwear was now real fashion.



























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/before-bikini-cool-photos-of-women-in-swimsuits-from-the-1930s/

When Paris Was Protected with Sandbags and Masking Tape, 1914-1918

Arc de Triomphe.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

By the first week of September 1914, the Germans had come within thirty kilometers of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris. The French and British armies were engaged in fierce fighting with the Germans in the First Battle of the Marne which repelled the Germans. Still, Parish remained uncomfortably close to the front lines for much of the Great War.

h/t: rarehistoricalphotos

Masking tapes on glass windows (protection against explosions).

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Once the war started, much of the city’s bustling life abruptly halted as men mobilized and shipped off to the frontlines. In their place, wives, daughters, sisters, and mothers filled the labor gap. Many shops closed, though those selling food and other daily provisions remained open. Several of Paris’ big hotels, devoid of guests and much of their staff, transformed into hospitals.

Notre Dame de Paris.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

It was during this time that sandbags began to enter largely into the scenery of Paris. To protect its famous monuments from bombardment and shrapnel, the city’s population set up piles of sandbags, stored the important artwork in a safe location, removed the stained-glass windows from cathedrals and other buildings.

Fontaine Carpeaux.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Another creative protection method was reinforcing windows with lattices of masking tape which was never tested whether it really worked against the blast. Nevertheless, it offered some sort of psychological protection against the gloomy wartime backdrop.

Stores using mask tapes.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Colonne Vendôme.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Le Louvre.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

Another view of Notre Dame de Paris.

Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France


Biblioteque Nationale de France

Sandbags protecting the Amiens Cathedral.

Biblioteque Nationale de France

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/when-paris-was-protected-with-sandbags-and-masking-tape-1914-1918/

Frederic Edwin Church’s Beautiful Pantings of Icebergs Between Labrador and Greenland, 1859 – 1861

In the summer of 1859, American landscape painter Frederic Edwin Church (1826–1900) took trip aboard a schooner to Newfoundland and Labrador to observe icebergs. Louis Legrand Noble wrote up the excursion in the book After Icebergs with a Painter. In 1861, at the outbreak of the Civil War, Church exhibited Icebergs: The North at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts.

The Icebergs is a superb example of Frederic Edwin Church’s technical skill and clever marketing. The seductively inviting colors, glowing subterranean light, and glossy, tactile surfaces of the icebergs attract the viewer’s eye. Yet in reality, the scene is an inhospitable place filled with danger, as the broken mast in the foreground indicates.

h/t: flashbak
























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/frederic-edwin-churchs-beautiful-pantings-of-icebergs-between-labrador-and-greenland-1859-1861/

Beautiful Female Fashion Photography in the 1960s by Hans Dukkers

Fashion of the 1960s featured a number of diverse trends. It was a decade that broke many fashion traditions, mirroring social movements during the time.

h/t: vintag.es

Around the middle of the decade, fashions arising from small pockets of young people in a few urban centers received large amounts of media publicity, and began to heavily influence both the haute couture of elite designers and the mass-market manufacturers. Examples include the mini skirt, culottes, go-go boots, and more experimental fashions, less often seen on the street, such as curved bad-shaped PVC dresses and other PVC clothes.

In the late 1960s, the hippie movement also exerted a strong influence on women’s clothing styles, including bell-bottom jeans, tie-dye and batik fabrics, as well as paisley prints. These amazing photos were taken by Dutch photographer Hans Dukkers (1920-1985) that show female fashion in the 1960s.






















SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/02/beautiful-female-fashion-photography-in-the-1960s-by-hans-dukkers/