The Wining Images of The Female in Focus Photography Awards 2021

The Female in Focus award from 1854 Media and the British Journal of Photography addresses the gender imbalance in photography. Globally, 70-80% of photography students are women, yet they account for only 13-15% of professional photographers. This selection of work demonstrates a tapestry of women’s experiences from around the world

Camo 2.0 4415 – single image winner

‘Beauty and greatness do not belong to the gods alone’ (African proverb). Beadwork in hair inspired by beads worn and treasured by the artist as a child growing up in Kenya. There, the more colourful the beads, the more beautiful one’s hair was deemed. Accessorising hair with beads is common in beauty cultures across Africa (Thandiwe Muriu/Female in Focus 21)

More: 1854 Media h/t: guardian

Rules for Fighting (Reglas para pelear) – series winner

When Paola Jiménez Quispe was five, her father was murdered in their native city of Lima, Peru. After googling his name one day, she found an article showing a photograph of her father covered in blood on the passenger seat of his car. ‘My father and mother wrote in a notebook before getting married … about love, relationships, parenting. I use this notebook as canvas, I include writings from both of them, and the object itself as I found it. This is my mother in her teens … This is a page of my mother notebook … she loves plants’ (Paola Jiménez Quispe/Female in Focus 21)

Rules for Fighting (Reglas para pelear) – series winner

A compelling amalgamation of photographs, texts and objects relating to Jiménez’s research into her father’s death and a manifestation of her grief. They include rolls of film her father made, his notebook, belongings found on him when he was killed, and police documents from the case. But more than simply a reinvestigation of his murder, the work is about ‘who my father was to my family’, says the artist. ‘What kind of partner he was to my mother … and finally, what his loss meant and the trauma that has been with us for a long time.’ (Paola Jiménez Quispe/Female in Focus 21)

Paola Jiménez Quispe –series winner

My mother was left with three children: my sister (14), my brother (12) and myself (five). She struggled with depression for many years. She never remarried and we all kind of were left without a father and mother. ‘After several years, I began to investigate deeply into his murder,’ says the artist. ‘I had an urge to build a relationship with him; this is what motivated me.’ (Paola Jiménez Quispe/Female in Focus 21)

Untitled, from the series My Hijab has a Voice: Revisited – series winner

A series of portraits of the artist and her sister, which investigate the experiences of Muslim women from an autobiographical perspective. Shot in Bateman’s home in Surrey, England, the series invites audiences into a Muslim woman’s private space with the intention to humanise. (Jodie Bateman/Female in Focus 21)

Untitled, from the series My Hijab has a Voice: Revisited – series winner

Adopting poses that mimic historical paintings famous for their objectification of women, Bateman and her sister sit fully clothed and defiant, turning outdated stereotypes on their heads. ‘It is vital to listen to Muslim women’s voices, as often they are silenced and spoken for by men,’ she says. (Jodie Bateman/Female in Focus 21)

Untitled, from the series My Hijab has a Voice: Revisited – series winner

‘Often Muslim women are only seen to wear black, and are portrayed as old-fashioned or backwards for their choice to cover their bodies. Western society continuously feeds the stereotype of oppression, which has been followed by acts of banning the niqab and burkini, and even going to the lengths of banning the hijab in professional places in some countries.’ (Jodie Bateman/Female in Focus 21)

Reeva Steenkamp, 29, shot three times by her boyfriend on Valentine’s Day – single image winner

Lebo Thoka/Female in Focus 21

Be and Madeline – single image winner

Be and Madeline, child and mother pictured in a loving embrace. Ancestral and Unceded Lands of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples (Vancouver, BC, Canada), 2020. (Kali Spitzer/Female in Focus 21)

Twins Expecting. From the series Birth of a Mother, 2019 – single image winner

When does being a mother begin? The ordeal of birth? The moment of conception? Or is it something beyond and before that, rooted deep in one’s intentions? Behind the ‘miracle of conception’, innumerable tragedies, failures and unhappy accidents lie unspoken. Photographing the twins, pregnant at the same time, felt like capturing a spark of magic. Their individual journeys to motherhood are are completely unique and yet miraculously in sync. (Imogen Freeland/Female in Focus 21)

Time of Transparency – single image winner

This work explores the societal phenomenon that perceives women in the context of youth and beauty. During menopause, women change physically and mentally. For many women, it’s a time when children leave home and parents die; it’s a time of goodbyes but also of new beginnings, new relationships, new passions. Often at this age women define themselves anew. Gradually over time, women become socially invisible, which can affect them in various ways. (Marzena Hans/Female in Focus 21)

Noritz-Reyes Family, Toronto, 2021 – single image winner

The Noritz-Reyes family on a Sunday afternoon in April during lockdown in Toronto. Photographed remotely on an iPhone. From an ongoing series documenting my family during Covid-19. (Stephanie Noritz/Female in Focus 21)

Luz de Otoño – Autumn light – single image winner

This image was taken in October 2020 in Polanco, a neighbourhood with a large Orthodox Jewish community in Mexico City. During the first lockdown, when churches and temples were closed, the Jewish community used their balconies to pray twice daily. Even as some of the tightest lockdown restrictions began to lift, and as urban spaces could be visited once again, balconies were still used as an outdoor space for socialising and play. (Natalia Garcia/Stephanie Noritz)

Women of the sea – single image winner

For more than 10 years, Israeli women from the Machsom Watch organisation have taken Palestinian women and children to visit the sea; for most of them, it’s the first time in their life. (Orna Naor/Female in Focus 21)

The Triplets’ Fate – single image winner

The triplets wear a shirt embroidered with the word ‘united’, but their futures will be drastically different. Many Indians live with extended family; after marriage, the boys will stay in the family house. The mother lifts up her daughter’s chin for her to face her fate. When married, the girl will move in with her in-laws. The mother wears a set of bracelets, a sign of married women. (Anouchka Renaud Eck/Female in Focus 21)

Vittoria for Espacio Latino – single image winner

‘Part of a personal portraiture project I started working on at the beginning of 2021. My main focus was to portray the individuality of a group of Latino creatives living and working in London, bringing more visibility to an almost invisible community in the UK. I wanted to challenge traditional notions and perceptions of what it means to be Latino nowadays, to highlight individuality within a generalised group that experiences very marked stereotypes.’ (Paola Vivas/Female in Focus 21)

SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/the-wining-images-of-the-female-in-focus-photography-awards-2021/

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The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:52:51

David Pelham - A Cure For Cancer, 1973.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665521930356588544

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:49:18

David O'Connor - Pavane, 1988.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665521706923851776

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:45:36

Bob Haberfield - Stargate, 1983.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665521473437499392

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:38:45

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665521043131236352

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:33:23

Bob Fowke, 1976.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665520704919371776

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:30:03

Alan Aldridge - Time and Again, 1967.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665520495228289024

The Science Fiction Gallery 2021-10-20 09:24:17

Adrian Chesterman - Apeman, Spaceman, 1979.

SOURCE: https://sciencefictiongallery.tumblr.com/post/665520132099031041

Beautiful Photos of the Lincoln Continental Mark V

The Continental Mark V is a personal luxury coupe that was marketed by the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company from the 1977 to 1979 model years in North America. The fourth generation Mark series, the Mark V was derived from its Continental Mark IV predecessor, bringing an extensive update to the interior and exterior design. While only sold for three years, the Mark V is the best-selling generation of the Mark series, with 228,262 examples produced.

h/t: vintag.es


At 230 inches long, the Mark V is the largest two-door coupe ever sold by Ford Motor Company, with the 233-inch long two-door and four-door Lincoln Continental sedans (produced alongside it) as the only longer vehicle ever marketed by Ford.

Distinguished by its sharp-edged exterior design, design themes of the Mark V would be adapted onto Lincoln vehicles throughout the 1980s. For 1980, the Mark V was replaced by the Continental Mark VI. As the Mark series underwent downsizing in the interest of fuel economy, the Mark VI saw significant reductions in exterior dimensions.

All Continental Mark Vs were assembled alongside the Lincoln Continental at the now-closed Wixom Assembly Plant in Wixom, Michigan.












SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/beautiful-photos-of-the-lincoln-continental-mark-v/

These Realistic Animal Paintings Show How We Neglect Them

We humans often have the tendency to forget that we’re alone on this planet. There are other living creatures that we often forget about or even worse, use them for our own purpose. This is an important issue that South Korean artist Young-sung Kim is trying to address in his work.

His oil paintings from the series called “Nothing. Life. Object.” look so realistic and lifelike, just like the problems he’s trying to show to the world. From fish trapped in glass bowls to frogs captured in jars, Kim’s paintings are representing a cruel and painful reality. He thinks that modern society is often forgetting about other living organisms, as a result of “advanced development of material civilizations.”

More: Instagram h/t: ourfunnylittlesite






























SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/these-realistic-animal-paintings-show-how-we-neglect-them/

Richard Saunders Creates Giant Bushes In The Shape Of His Deceased Cat

Many of us know the feeling when you just terribly miss a pet you used to have. I sure do, even got a tattoo of my cat! However, 75-year-old Richard Saunders took it to a whole new level. The artist decided to express love for his cat, who died 5 years ago, by creating extremely surprising surreal images. In these images, plants from real places are replaced by giant bushes in the shape of his adorable cat Tolly.

More: Richard Saunders, Facebook h/t: boredpanda

Richard Saunders exclusively told Bored Panda the story behind his project named “The Topiary Cat”: “Initially I created these images just for fun. I had taken a photograph, in the grounds of a historic house, of a huge cloud topiary, and it occurred to me that I could fairly easily photograph Tolly in a position to match the shape of the bushes.”

Richard claims that after making the image and posting it on Flickr, it was stolen and his name was removed without any approval. The image ended up going viral on Facebook and people believed it to be a real topiary! Later, BBC did a story for their page and revealed Richard to be the real creator of these manipulations as he made more and more of them.

Richard has been a surrealist painter since he was a teenager and learned to use Photoshop over two decades ago in his job as an advertising Creative Director. He says: “The idea of creating The Topiary Cat, over eight years ago, while Tolly was still alive, was easily accomplished with skills I already knew. The images have become more complicated since, many taking days to produce, with tailor-made photos taken especially for them.”



































































SOURCE: https://designyoutrust.com/2021/10/richard-saunders-creates-giant-bushes-in-the-shape-of-his-deceased-cat/